Founded in 1991 | A division of the American Counseling Association


2022 ACCA Conference Breakout Sessions

Presentation dates and times will be released in the near future.

Bringing Men Together for Sexual Health:  Addressing Sexuality Concerns of College-Age Men

Presenter(s):

Daniel Alonzo
California State University Northridge

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: In the era of #MeToo, women are finding platforms to reclaim their collective power and sexual rights.         But what is happening for men as they navigate blind seas of confusion and defensiveness?        Specifically, what is happening for college-age men?  Emerging adult men are struggling to find their way in a new world without a map of the new landscape.  We see the evidence of this struggle in rising rates of anxiety and depression among men.  Nowhere is this clearer than on college campuses.  Completed suicides of men on college campuses continues to rise.         Research shows that the college-age years of 18 to 26 are a difficult transition for men.  Men are expected to master the tasks of emerging adulthood, but they receive little information or modeling about sexuality in those crucial years. By their mid-20's, men are expected to know their bodies, know how to initiate sexual discussions with partners, know how to obtain responsible consent, and know how to maximize pleasure in their partners and in themselves.  Clearly, this is the exception, not the rule.       This workshop will suggest ways to bring young adult men together on campus, inviting them into rich conversations about integrity, responsibility, and sexual health.

Learning Objectives:

  • By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to describe at least one challenge that college-age men face as they balance the demands of emerging adulthood and the desire for satisfying sexual experiences.
  • At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to describe one way to bring  college-age men together learn a more present-focused approach to mindfulness-based pleasure.

Exploring BIPOC Identities: Unpacking Racial Trauma & Fostering Mental Wellness on College Campuses

Presenter(s):

Makini Austin
Austin Behavioral Health

A. Kikora Franklin
The Pennsylvania State University

Lindsay Mitchiner
Agnes Scott College

Josee Muldrew
Georgia Institute of Technology

Abstract: While there have been many points in history where society reflects on expectations of diversity and inclusion, the summer of 2020 prompted a clarion call for more effective strategies to address issues raised by discrimination, microaggressions, racialized violence, and systemic inequities. As faculty, staff, and students engaged in discussions of racial justice, colleges and universities had an opportunity to consider their roles to advance diversity, equity and inclusion at their institutions. Many have expressed their commitment to more equitable outcomes for underrepresented populations by placing DEI at the core of their institutional practice, but this commitment must go beyond pamphlets and mission statements. This course is an exploration of how mental health professionals on college campuses can provide the tools to begin this work.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will increase knowledge about the impact of race based traumatic stress (RBTS) and racial trauma and on college campus culture and student learning.
  • ·Participants will discuss how they can address the interplay of race and trauma and its effect on faculty and staff who are charged with instructing and guiding students who are expected to engage and learn in these environments.
  • Participants will utilize a post traumatic growth framework to build resilience and resistance strategies for themselves and the students they serve.

The Elephant in the Room: Working with Masculinity in Counseling College Men

Presenter(s):

Daniel Bates
University of Cincinnati

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: It is critically important for counselors to competently conceptualize masculinity in order to appropriately and effectively work with male clients. Effective treatment engagement with men needs to be informed by a gender-sensitive approach. In 2019, only 13.4% of the male population received mental health services of any kind compared to 24.7% women (Terlizzi & Zablotsky, 2020). This may be explained by the low rates of depression reported by men (Patten et al., 2015; Watterson et al., 2017), yet the suicide rate among men is three times higher than women, while globally men die by suicide two times higher than women (Navaneelan, 2012). In fact, suicide is listed among the top three causes of mortality among men (British Columbia Vital Statistics Agency, 2002). Depression rates among men are far below that of women, yet the rates of suicide, alcoholism, and drug abuse far exceed rates among women. What can explain this confusing set of facts? Depression among men often goes unidentified, undiagnosed, and untreated, leading to a worsening of mental health problems. This may be due, in part, to masculine norms of stoicism and suppression of emotion functioning as cultural confounders to the detection, assessment, and treatment of depression.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will recognize the factors that influence men's mental health.
  • Attendees will conceptualize masculinity and how it functions in the lives of their male clients.
  • Attendees will identify effective gender-sensitive practices for working with men.
  • Attendees will appraise how a gender-sensitive approach can be used among various case examples presented.

Alcohol, Drugs, and Consequences: Rethinking Alcohol and Drug Use Prevention Programming in Collegiate Settings

Presenter(s):

Latasha Becton
North Carolina Central University

Jennifer Whitney
UNC Greensboro

Chesley Kennedy
UNC Greensboro

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Research and Program Evaluation

Abstract: Institutions of Higher Education are required to follow the federal regulations set forth by the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA). As part of those regulations, each institution must establish and implement a program of prevention, education, and intervention for students and staff who do not abide by policy standards. The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief overview of DFSCA regulations, sample prevention activities, and sample intervention activities. Selected prevention and intervention programs will be described, and suggestions for approaches to program design that encourage interdisciplinary and cross-campus collaboration will be discussed with a goal of thinking holistically about student-focused interventions.  Additionally, suggestions are offered to improve approaches to assessment of alcohol and drug related risk in collegiate settings.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the parameters of the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act relevant to institutions of higher education
  • Describe alcohol and other drug prevention and intervention programs in collegiate settings
  • Compare and contrast alcohol and other drug programs in higher education settings
  • Discuss the impact of interventions on student outcomes related to alcohol and other drug programs

College counselor burnout: Research and implication

Presenter(s):

Gregory Bohner
Lindsey Wilson College

Timothy Smith
Lindsey Wilson College

Topic(s):

  • Administrative
  • Research and Program Evaluation

Abstract: Burnout is a concern for many college counselors, particularly with the stresses experienced over the past two years. This session will explore research conducted with ACCA members regarding the relationships between different work responsibilities and burnout. As part of the process, the College Counselor Activity Rating Scale for measuring college counselor work responsibilities was developed. The session will start with an overview of the history of the college counseling profession and burnout literature. This will be followed with exploration of the research questions, methods, and findings. In conclusion, a discussion of implications for counseling center administrators and research regarding self-care will be presented.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe the history of burnout.
  • Participants will be able to compare the historical work responsibilities of college counselors to current responsibilities.
  • Participants will assess the application of the college counselor burnout study to their current responsibilities.
  • Participants will create a self-care plan to address burnout.

Dungeons & Dragons & Therapy: An Experiential Role-Playing Group to Connect, Empower, and Act as One's Ideal Self

Presenter(s):

Vincent Dehili
NC State University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Interpersonal process group can provide building group cohesion, finding universally shared experience, engaging in altruistic behaviors, developing novel socializing techniques, and engagement in pleasurable events (Yalom & Leszcz, 2005). Dungeons and Dragons (D&D) is a role playing game (RPG), meaning that players take on fictional characters that implement their actions in a fantasy world (Blackmon, 1994). The group combines theoretical approaches across group theories to combine interpersonal process. psychodrama, intersubjectivity, and mentalization-based therapy to provide a unique flexible experience to assist clients and staff with enhancing their interpersonal connections through shared cooperative play. A gamified behavioral hierarchy ("Bounty Quest") allows for implementation of social skills outside of the group experience. Role-playing games (RPGs) provide a medium to "act as if" clients are an idealized interpersonal version of themselves. Utilizing improvisation techniques to generate a shared narrative which weaves interpersonal conflict and moral dilemmas, creating a parallel process between interpersonal goals and real-world behaviors. This group consists of an experiential group to illustrate safety tools to address microaggressions, empower members to engage in play through unique dilemmas, and reflect on the benefits integrating Table-Top Experiences to increase staff morale, connectivity, and diversify group therapy programining.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define the merits and applications of role-playing games (RPGs) within the therapeutic setting and it's adaptation to collegiate mental health.
  • Learn how to fuse interpersonal process, skill building, and personal exploration within the framework of the RPG.
  • Describe at least three safety tools used to assist in identifying and addressing micro-aggression that may arise in group.
  • Provide a model for implementing a "Dungeons and Dragons"-based therapeutic RPG.
  • Explain the necessary competencies and logistical considerations for implementing a therapeutic RPG.

Laughing and Crying: Lessons Learned from a Pandemic-Era Grief/Loss Group

Presenter(s):

Kathryn DeVinney
Nazareth College of Rochester

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Started in 2019, the weekly grief/loss group for students at Nazareth College has gone through many ups and downs while managing to retain every founding participant. This session is aimed for anyone looking to start or improve grief/loss support groups on their campus. We will discuss outreach, recruitment, and retention of new members, common themes addressed in the group space that are particular to emerging adults, managing COVID-specific bereavement issues, and group facilitator self-care.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify 2 stakeholders on campus to help with new group member recruitment.
  • List steps for outreach/screening of group members and best practices.
  • Describe ways in which the group care model for grief/loss can decrease isolation in college student population.
  • Explain why self-care for the group facilitator is important and how to enact a self-care plan.

Let's Get Critical: Reevaluating the Conversation around Self-Care

Presenter(s):

Krystyn Dupree
Nicholls State University

Elnora Parker Vicks
Nicholls State University

Topic(s):

  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: We all learn and hear about self-care from early on in our studies. We discuss how it's important, and how it prevents burnout. We attend continuing education on it. But when was the last time you engaged with your peers about what self-care is? What does it look like? How has it changed as the landscape of our universities, our profession, our country, and even the world has changed? Thomas and Morris (2017) addressed the disconnect between the knowledge of self-care and the action of counselors engaging in self-care, as the oversaturation grows giving us a "noseblind" sensation towards the concept of self-care.  This presentation will have participants reexamine how they have engaged with self-care in the past. Lastly, participants will discuss how we can be more active in how we are defining self-care, engaging in self-care, and having conversations about self-care.

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine how we can become "noseblind" to self-care due to oversaturation of the phrase over the course of school and career, contributing to disconnect between concept and action.
  • Explore how we can be more active as professionals with how we define, engage, and discuss self-care.

Why Make Things? The Benefits of Engaging with a Regular Creative Practice

Presenter(s):

Jessica Eldridge
University of CA Irvine Counseling Center

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Why Make Things? The Benefits of Engaging with a Regular Creative Practice was developed as a three-part workshop series for college students, with each workshop exploring a segment of the benefits to be gained by making things with one's hands.  In this 90-minute breakout session, participants will experience one part of the workshop series (Advocacy, Community, Belonging) along with the accompanying embroidery project.  Participants will be provided supplies and instruction to begin a simple embroidery project to stitch throughout the session.  Advocacy, Community, and Belonging presents information on the use of handmade crafts in advocacy and social justice work. Crafting provides an avenue for people to use their voices to bring awareness to and/or express dissent with issues. It is a way to feel connected with one's authentic self and to ground oneself in times of chaos, and a way to bring people together and express the strength of their collective voices.  Participants will learn how crafts can be used to raise awareness about issues of concern as well as to connect with and express their authentic selves in relation to their causes and through their use of craft.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify at least 3 mental health benefits that can be obtained by engaging in a regular creative practice.
  • Participants will be able to identify examples of craftivism (activism through craft) on college campuses and in larger communities. Participants will be able to describe at least 2 ways that craftivism can promote greater awareness of and inspire action regarding social justice issues. Participants will discuss ways to pursue their chosen forms of craftivism for self-expression and community building.
  • Participants will be provided with tools and instruction to learn the steps of a basic embroidery project, and will demonstrate increasing skills in the use of fabric and embroidery hoop, threading a needle and 1-2 basic embroidery stitches.

Navigating Existential Catapults: Awareness, Self-Care, and Difficult Transitions. Caring for the Counselor, Caring for the Client.

Presenter(s):

Kristin Erickson
Bellevue University

Topic(s):

  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Like many of our clients, at some point in life, it is not uncommon for us as counselors to also face difficult existential catapults that rock us to our very core.  Regardless of how new or how seasoned we are as counselors, we are still human, and face monumental challenges that often leave us questioning ourselves, who we are, why we are here, and how on earth we will ever get through what we are facing. Understanding existential aspects to these painful life experiences and making sense of them, isn't easy (Bauman and Waldo, 1998; Corey, Muratori, Austin, & Austin, 2018).  Addressing and tending to difficult, life-changing existential catapults in our lives along with the feelings and the deep existential themes that accompany them, can feel monumental, overwhelming, raw, and vulnerable feeling. Getting back up when knocked down can be rough. Yet, at these times, engaging in deep self-care soul work can be powerful, profound, and help with meaning making of the suffering we experience.  In this interactive presentation, we will discuss several self-care strategies that touch on cultivating courage, compassion, resiliency, and other "muscles of the soul" (Seaward, 2017, pp. 92-93) and explore applications with clients.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe ways to identify, attend to, and work through the existential themes related to difficult existential catapults we most likely all will face at some point in our personal and professional lives.
  • Explain ways to engage in healthy integrative self-care and wellness strategies while coping with vulnerable feelings, and the difficult challenges, changes, and transitions that naturally accompany existential catapults.
  • Describe applications to working with clients and explain various creative interventions to help clients identify, attend to, and work through the existential catapults they face in life.

College Women and Intimate Partner Violence: What it is and what it means

Presenter(s):

Kelly Gentry
University of Denver

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Recently, the focus in higher education has been on the prevention and intervention strategies of sexual assault on campus. However, more than 40% of college women report experiencing abuse by an intimate partner making it a significant cause for concern on college campuses. This session will focus on defining IPV, recognizing the signs, and identifying the mental health and academic impact of IPV on college women.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will be able to define intimate partner violence
  • Attendees will be able to recognize the signs of IPV in college women
  • Attendees will be able to identify three ways in which IPV affects the mental health and academic success of college women

ACCA Diversity & Inclusion Committee Open House

Presenter(s):

Ahmed Ghuman
University of Pittsburgh

Vinny Dehili
NC State University Counseling Center

Topic(s):

  • Open-House

Abstract: This open house will provide participants an opportunity to learn more information about the ACCA Diversity & Inclusion Committee and how they can get involved and join the committee.   Participants will have an opportunity to meet members of the committee, explore ways to promote an inclusive college counseling center, and network with colleagues committed to engaging in social justice advocacy.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants an opportunity to learn more information about the ACCA Diversity & Inclusion Committee.
  • Participants will have an opportunity to meet current members of the committee.
  • Participants will explore ways to promote an inclusive college counseling center.
  • Participants will have an opportunity to network with colleagues committed to engaging in social justice advocacy.

Building a Culturally Diverse and Inclusive College Counseling Center

Presenter(s):

Ahmed Ghuman
University of Pittsburgh

Jay Darr
University of Pittsburgh

Topic(s):

  •   Administrative

Abstract: This experiential workshop will focus on building a culturally diverse and inclusive college counseling center that's centered on cultural humility and equitable practices.  Facilitators will guide participants on creating a diversity plan for their center that includes establishing annual goals and implementing recruitment and retention strategies for diverse staff members and trainees.  Moreover, Facilitators will discuss ways to develop a multicultural care team that provides administrative, clinical, and outreach consultation to the center and campus community.  Additionally, this workshop will focus on responding to racial/bias incidents on campus and establishing brave spaces to engage in dialogue.  Lastly, this workshop will explore assessing cultural humility and offering a multicultural counseling specialization for trainees.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will learn how to create a diversity plan that includes developing goals and recruitment and retention strategies for diverse staff members and trainees.
  • Participants will learn how to develop a multicultural care team that provides administrative, clinical, and outreach consultation to the center and campus community.
  • Participants will learn how to respond to a racial/bias incident on campus while establishing brave spaces for community members to engage in meaningful dialogue.
  • Participants will explore ways to assess cultural humility, and offer a multicultural counseling specialization for trainees.

Short-term Group Counseling Techniques

Presenter(s):

Josh Gunn
Kennesaw State University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice   
  • Group Counseling

Abstract: The majority of counselor training focuses on individual counseling, which leaves many counselors feeling ill prepared to confidently and effectively provide group counseling. This workshop will focus on practical group counseling skills that can be integrated into many types of group offerings. Using a semester-long process group as the prototype, we will discuss how to build cohesion through active leader education and activities, and explore how to use a relational, here-and-now focus to help group members improve their understanding of themselves and how they navigate the world.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to facilitate group activities that help build cohesion.
  • Participants will be able to apply strategies for maintaining a focus on the here and now.
  • Participants will be able to demonstrate techniques for increasing intra- and inter-personal awareness.

Stalking: The Problem Lurking on College Campuses

Presenter(s):

James Hagenbaugh
Thomas Jefferson university

Topic(s):

  •  Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: This presentation will focus on helping clinicians to understand stalking and why college students may be vulnerable to engaging in and being victims of stalking. Additionally, the presentation will review the different typologies of individuals who engage in stalking behaviors and management strategies for each typology. Finally, the presentation will help clinicians develop interventions that can be used with students who have been victims of stalking

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize the different typologies of stalkers
  • Explain reasons why students are prone to engage in stalking behaviors
  • Identify interventions that can be used to manage individuals who engage in stalking behaviors

Supervising staff and trainees after their patient has died by suicide

Presenter(s):

Jamie Hagenbaugh
Thomas Jefferson University

Topic(s):

  •  Clinical Supervision and Training

Abstract: The death of a patient by suicide is painful and frightening for any mental health clinician. Unfortunately, a substantial proportion of clinicians and trainees may experience a client dying by suicide at some time during their professional career. Common responses to a client's death by suicide are shock, grief, guilt, fear of blame, self-doubt, shame, anger, and betrayal. These responses can be severe and have long-term consequences which can include changes in how clinicians practice or even a change in their professional environment. Throughout the years' research has indicated that psychological autopsies and postvention strategies can be helpful but clinicians must personally work through the grieving process and develop acceptance of the loss. This presentation will focus on the frequency in which clients in therapy die by suicide along with clinician and trainee reactions. It will discuss ways that counseling centers staff can support other clinicians and trainees with strategies to help them work through their grief.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to recognize the various reactions of clinicians and trainees who have had a patient die by suicide
  • Participants will be able to summarize the supervision strategies used to help clinicians and trainees who have had a patient die by suicide

Applying Improv and Role Playing Games in Counselor Supervision

Presenter(s):

Eran Hanke
University of Northern Iowa

William Peach
University of Northern Iowa Counseling Center

Topic(s):

  • Clinical Supervision and Training

Abstract: Applied improvisation involves the use of theatrical improvisational principles and activities to promote factors such as presence, flexibility, and acceptance while challenging perfectionism, engaging in creative problem-solving, and embracing mistakes. Role-playing games provide opportunities to enhance agency and mastery, to construct self-concepts, to form social connections, to enhance communication, and to take interpersonal risks while working toward a common purpose. In this session, the presenters will identify how cornerstones of improv - such as "yes and" thinking and viewing mistakes as gifts - can be used to promote counselor development. They will illustrate how imaginative role-playing can contribute to building competence and teamwork among counselors-in-training. Finally, the presenters will share how they have used games and activities in counselor supervision. In turn, they will discuss how counselors-in-training learn how to adapt the principles and activities to their work with college students.

Learning Objectives:

  • To identify the principles of theatrical improvisation and to describe how these principles can be applied to counselor supervision.
  • To describe how role-playing games and improv activities can be used to facilitate counselor development.
  • To describe how role-playing games and improv activities can be used as counseling interventions with college students.

Lessons Learned from the Pandemic: Acuity, Access and Adapting to Changing Needs

Presenter(s):

Janelle Johnson
Santa Fe Community College, NM

Rosalie Lipfert
Santa Fe Community College, NM

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention
  • Community College Focus

Abstract: The Pandemic prompted innovation from college counselors to adapt to increased rates of anxiety, depression, and other mental health symptoms among students while also providing remote or hybrid services. Nearly two years into the Pandemic, our forms of service delivery, which were at one point novel, have become part of our everyday practice. It has become apparent that "the measures that are taken now to support a vulnerable student population will help mitigate the overall global mental health burden associated with this period of extraordinary disruption" (Grubic, N, et al., 2020).The adaptations required throughout the Pandemic afforded new strengths in service delivery – for instance, telehealth facilitated greater accessibility for many students – but the need for these changes also exposed opportunities for growth that may have otherwise gone unnoticed. This presentation will focus on new strategies for innovative service delivery for students grappling with returning to a hybrid campus. Counseling Services used the Pandemic to participate in the creation of a Student Resource Center, formed partnerships with cohort and allied health programs, teamed up with faculty to create programming to end mental health stigma, launched "The Chill Room," a virtual support site, and provided online student support groups.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify how telehealth has increased the ability of counseling centers to reach more students through the use of remote and hybrid mental health services.
  • Understand how innovative programming is supporting students while addressing the gaps that exist in mental health services.
  • Demonstrate how to create campus partnerships that transform the need for continually adapting service delivery into a sustainable model of care

Advancing College Student Wellbeing Through Addressing The Social Determinants of Health

Presenter(s):

Kaprea Johnson
The Ohio State University

Lauren Robins

Adrienne White

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Ensuring college student wellbeing includes college counseling and college health professionals collaborating to advance health equity on college campuses. Health equity includes removing obstacles, so that everyone has an equal opportunity to health and wellbeing. In the most practical sense, addressing health equity often includes addressing the Social Determinants of Health (SDOH). The SDOH are defined by 'Healthy People 2030' as "the conditions in the environments where people are born, live, learn, work, play, worship, and age that affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality of life outcomes and risks.  This specific presentation discusses two research studies that examined the relationship between social determinants of health and anxiety and depression. Anxiety and depression were chosen as dependent variables because they both disproportionally impact college students and severely impact their psychological wellbeing. The presentation concludes with recommendations for how college counselors can address health equity through assessing and addressing the SDOH. College counselors will learn about brief SDOH assessment tools, how to incorporate SDOH assessment into their clinical treatment plan, and how to collaborate across campus to assist students in advancing their wellbeing through addressing health equity challenges.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe, discuss, and explain the relationship between health equity, social determinants of health, and college student wellbeing.
  • Participants will be able to apply best practices in assessing for social determinants of health to their college counseling setting and practice.
  • Participants will be able to create a social determinant of health assessment and management plan in their college counseling setting.

It's Okay to Be W.E.I.R.D!

Presenter(s):

Yannick Ladson
Mercer County Community College

Topic(s):

  • Community College Focus

Abstract: Strange. Odd. Peculiar. Weird. These words are used to describe people who do not fit into societal norms. Western, Educated, Industrialised, Rich, and Democratic (WEIRD) societies have values and norms that differ from the rest of the world.  Students that exhibit odd behaviors tend to be identified by faculty as "students of concern" to behavior intervention teams and counseling services. Even when the behaviors do not pose a threat to the community nor violate conduct policies, these students tend to be singled out and seen as concerning. However, is being weird mental illness? Has being weird become pathologized in higher education? What are the cultural implications of this? These questions will be explored in this interactive, collaborative, and EDUtaining session!

Learning Objectives:

  • To learn how cross cultural perspectives of mental illness.
  • To explore how difference is pathologized and how it presents in the classroom and college community.
  • How to address faculty/staff concerns about students who exhibit strange or odd behavior.
  • To learn strategies to avoid psychological harm and stigmatizing students.

Cultural Humility in the COVID era

Presenter(s):

Andrew Lee
Temple University

Abstract: Panelists will provide an overview of cultural humility and will discuss implications for working with underserved populations during the COVID era. The discussion will address common missed opportunities for counseling centers; practical considerations for improved visibility and accessibility; and recommendations for advocacy on college and university campuses. Though applicable to diverse populations in general, the discussion will focus on Asian and Asian-American students, Black and African-American students, Hispanic students and Hispanic-serving institutions, and queer students. There will be time for audience questions.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to define cultural humility.
  • Attendees will be able to name three common missed opportunities to support students from diverse backgrounds.
  • Participants will be able to identify three strategies to improve care for diverse students.

Creative Approaches to College Counselor Self-Care

Presenter(s):

Sonja Lund
University of Scranton

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: The topic of self-care is heavily emphasized in the field of counseling but can often be a challenge to implement in our own lives, especially in times of crisis. Particularly in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, college counselors have seen an increased client load thus increasing the odds for vicarious trauma and burnout. This presentation will discuss the importance and benefits of self-care as well as a number of creative "right brained" approaches to counselor self-care. During the session, participants will develop practical strategies and plans that they can implement in their own lives. Participants will also have the opportunity to explore some of these creative approaches as an experiential part of the session. This presentation will offer participants the opportunity to look beyond the typical approaches to self-care in order to support counselor well-being.

Learning Objectives:

  • By the end of the session participants will be able to explain the importance and benefits of self-care and the ethical function of self-care.
  • By the end of the session participants will be able to list and describe examples of multiple forms of creative self-care.
  • By the end of the session participants will develop practical personal strategies for creative self-care for future implementation.

Culturally Responsive Counseling: Practical Counseling Applications for Addressing the Impact of Acculturative Stress and Identity Change on International Student Mental Health

Presenter(s):

Lindsay Lundeen
University of Georgia

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: This presentation will provide current research on acculturation stress and mental health outcomes for college counselors to be aware of when counseling international students. The presenter will provide definitions and examples of international student-specific acculturation and identity change experiences, while also providing attendees with background knowledge of empirically supported acculturation and identity change frameworks. This presentation also will provide information on the risk and protective factors of international student mental health and suicidality, in addition to evidence-based practices associated with international students. Additionally, this presentation will describe how acculturation, acculturation stress, and identity change impact international student mental health outcomes, structural supports available to international students on college campuses, and practical applications of how counseling international students differs from domestic students.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will be able to describe how acculturation and identity change impact international students and how acculturation stress and identity change can impact mental health outcomes. Attendees also will be able to apply empirically supported identity
  • Attendees will be able to critically analyze their privileged and marginalized identities also reflecting on how their identities impact the counseling process with international students.
  • Attendees will be able to select culturally appropriate structural supports for their international student clients.
  • Attendees will be able to utilize empirically supported counseling techniques with international student clients.
  • Attendees will be able to describe ways to facilitate better mental health outcomes when counseling international students and/or supervising a counseling intern working with international students.

When College Students Who Are Social Justice Leaders seek Counseling: A Paradigm for Therapeutic Support for Student Leaders

Presenter(s):

Cristian Mendoza
Georgian Court University

Sherritta Hughes
Georgian Court University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice      

Abstract: Over the last two years many college students of color in leadership roles have fought for social justice. Among these students, holistic mental health needs have surfaced, impacting their academic performance, self-esteem, and their intersections of their identity development. Moreover, their leadership is often impacted due to limitations within the ecology of the college climate, which in many instances neglects an act of awareness of continuity of current social and cultural injustices. In alignment with Crethar and Ratt's (2008) piece on Why Social Justice is a Counseling Concern, the contemporariness of such injustices that have occurred in recent times lends to greater attention to the mental health needs of these student leaders. However, these students may not seek mental health care on the college campus due to their apprehensiveness to being helped via counselors who are not culturally responsive and social justice informed. In response, this presentation offers insight into a culturally sensitive and integrative paradigm that counselors may use to address the nuance needs of college students of color who are fighting for social justice.

Learning Objectives:

  • Provide a heightened awareness of historical and present-day social prejudices that are overlooked on college campuses and in counseling, recognizing the ACA code of ethics and the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS).
  • Highlight special awareness to the lived experiences of ethnically diverse student leaders on a predominantly white campus, PWI.
  • For clinical implications, outline a paradigm that integrates critical race theory, help seeking behaviors of students of color, and social justice counseling theory.

Developmental trauma and rejection sensitivity: implications for college relationships

Presenter(s):

Kevin Merideth
Mississippi State University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Rejection sensitivity is a cognitive-affective trait that determines how people perceive, experience, and respond to rejection. Disrupted attachment and developmental trauma lead rejection sensitive persons to perceive rejection in places where it is not actually present, and to experience intense dysphoria in the presence of this perceived rejection. The effects of this subjective experience profoundly impact the behaviors of young-adult students in their relationships. Through an improved understanding of the way in which rejection sensitivity informs client experiences, clinicians working with college students may learn to assist rejection sensitive students in learning the ways in which they "defend" themselves, develop regulatory skills to manage dysphoria, and cultivate lasting change for better relationships. Suggestment assessment practices, interventions, and cultural considerations in working with rejection sensitive clients will be delineated and rehearsed.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will be able to identify 3-5 ways in which developmental experiences with rejection inform later life behavior in relationships.
  • Attendees will learn 2-3 interventions for rejection sensitive college students and practice one experiential exercise in intervention delivery.

Developing and Sustaining an Embedded Counselor Program

Presenter(s):

Sharon Mitchell
University at Buffalo

Alison Smith
University at Buffalo

Nicholas Fronczak
University at Buffalo

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice   
  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: A common refrain among mental health professionals in higher education is the importance of "meeting students where they are at". Embedding counselors in the locations outside of the main counseling center is an emerging counseling option that literally embodies this value. According to 2020 Association for University and College Counseling Center survey (Gorman et al, 2021), 21% of counseling centers have a counselor embedded in other locations on campus.  Health centers, residence halls, athletics, and underrepresented student support services offices were some of the most common settings.  This presentation provides an overview of the research on embedded counselors in higher education settings in terms of benefits and outcomes.  It also gives attention to the challenges associated with developing and maintaining these programs, such as defining scope of practice, maintaining professional boundaries, and ethical challenges (Karaffa, K.M., Bradtke, J.A., & Hanckock, T.S., 2021, Schreier, B.A. et al, 2021).

Learning Objectives:

  • Cite 3 findings of recent research on embedded counselors in higher education settings.
  • Identify 3 strategies for developing an embedded counselor program.
  • Describe unique clinical, scope of practice and ethical challenges of embedded counselors

Revolutionizing a practicum/internship model in the wake of COVID-19: Applications of technology, tele-health, and stepped care at a university/college counseling center

Presenter(s):

Kari Much
Minnesota State University Mankato

Miranda Hellenbrand
Counseling Center

Topic(s):

  •       Clinical Supervision and Training

Abstract: Clinical training programs within a university/college counseling center (UCCC) are mutually beneficial for the graduate students as well as for professional staff employed at the center.  Given the considerable change in landscape of campus mental health since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, UCCC's are uniquely positioned to take this opportunity to use technology to advance service delivery, including provision of training.    This presentation examines components included in a practicum/internship program, ways to encompass a stepped care service provision model within a training program, and best practices for offering training experiences through telehealth platforms.  An overview of the stepped care model used at Minnesota State University, Mankato will be given.

Learning Objectives:

  • Cite recommendations for re-vamping (or developing) a hybrid training program at a university/college counseling center.
  • Illustrate how to incorporate a training program with a stepped care model.
  • Identify benefits and drawbacks of providing supervision virtually, as well as give examples of best practices in providing virtual supervision

Diversity Dialogues: A Group Intervention in Engaging Conversations around Diversity and Inclusion.

Presenter(s):

John O'Malley
Regis University

Abstract: Looking for ways to foster conversations about diversity, equity, and inclusion on your campus? College counseling centers can serve as a valuable resource to students seeking deeper dialogue on these important topics. This presentation will share the results of a study looking at the experience of college students who participated in a four-week diversity dialogue program. Learn how the dialogue program was developed and delivered, and the takeaways from the program evaluation, so you can implement a similar group experience at your college campus.

Learning Objectives:

  • Articulate the elements of a diversity dialogue program so that participants can implement a similar group within their own college campus
  • Identify lessons learned from the lived experiences of past participants in the program
  • Apply Ivey's Microskills Hierarchy: A Pyramid for Building Cultural Intentionality framework into groupwork

Strategies for College Counselors When Working with Multiracial Clients

Presenter(s):

John O'Malley
Regis University

Asianna Harris
University of Nebraska at Kearney

Abstract: As the population on college campuses becomes more multiracial, it is imperative for college counselors to utilize strategies that reflect this change in their clinical work. Diangelo 2018 (xvi) stated "multiracial people, because they challenge racial constructs and boundaries, face unique challenges in a society in which racial categories have profound meaning" and college counselors must be multiculturally orientated to this dynamic. In addition to unpacking historical oppression multiracial college students have faced, this presentation will highlight strategies to help college counselors become more multiculturally competent and multiculturally orientated when working with multiracial college students.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify different multiracial identity models that counselors can use to help support multiracial identity development.
  • Articulate the unique challenges multiracial clients experience during the counseling process.
  • Recognize the different barriers multiracial clients have when accessing mental health services.
  • Apply lessons from the lived and told experiences of multiracial individuals to provide more culturally competent counseling services.
  • Explore the multiracial competencies and how they impact the therapeutic process.

Walk It Like You Talk It: A culture change towards challenging the stigma

Presenter(s):

Elnora Parker Vicks
Nicholls State University

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: What courageous conversations are you having with your students, peers, and counterparts about the culture change of mental health awareness?  How are you adapting with keeping the different generations engaged in mental health awareness to break the stigma. This presentation will have participants reexamine how they implement mental health awareness on a college campus. Finally, participants will discuss how we can be more  proactive in creating a culture  of well-being to promote and be effective in addressing mental health  on a college campus.

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine how we can create a culture of well being to help eliminate the barriers, which discourage students from openly talking about mental health.
  • Explore how we can be more  proactive with utilizing different platforms, resources, and engaging in conversations with our students to challenge the stigma by spreading mental health awareness.

Rethinking a College Counseling Service Model: Integrating Quick Access with Diverse Treatment Options

Presenter(s):

Mary Kathryn Prescott
Counseling and Psychological Services and Student Disability Resources, Penn State Harrisburg

Eric Holmes
Counseling and Psychological Services and Student Disability Resources, Penn State Harrisburg

Elizabeth Toepfer
Pennsylvania State University (University Park)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Administrative

Abstract: College counseling centers (CCCs) are increasingly under the microscope as students, parents, and campus and community stakeholders discuss serving students in an increasingly divisive world. There has been a steady increase in students seeking mental health services over the past 20 years (The Center for Collegiate Mental Health). This demand is further exacerbated by factors such as the impact of COVID-19 and a volatile national sociocultural climate. As we return to campus, CCCs are evaluating service delivery in a time when students are vocal advocates for timely care. Simply mirroring community agency services cannot support this need. Successful service delivery in other sectors, including healthcare, offers potential solutions. Telehealth and virtual resources can bridge gaps in care for students who often seek assistance from personal devices before scheduling appointments.     Penn State Harrisburg has implemented a service model that fuses aspects of the Flexible Care Model (Meek, 2021) and triaged care that prioritizes intakes within two days, retains individual counseling, and incorporates a hybrid continuum of additional services and resources. Supported by a unique University-wide program of shared mental health resources for all Penn State students, this model offers online platforms, telehealth psychiatry, inter-campus outreach, and crisis management.

Learning Objectives:

  • Analyze service model issues that contribute to counseling service access
  • Identify resources for expanding counseling services within a wellness model, and
  • Discuss and plan for modification strategies for their college counseling centers

Suicidality and Rural College Campuses: Bridging the Resource Gap to Support Student Mental Health

Presenter(s):

Tracie Rutherford Self
Minnesota State University, Mankato

Aaron Geringer
Minnesota State University, Mankato

Matt Erpelding
Minnesota State University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: While rural mental health has received an increased focus, there is a dearth of research which addresses student mental health needs on campuses located in rural communities. Clients in rural communities frequently experience suicidal ideation at rates higher than their urban counterparts, making college students who fit this demographic at greater risk of harm to themselves. Further, students with mental health needs who are attending colleges in rural communities may experience several concerns when seeking mental health services. These include access to appropriate care; availability of providers, specifically when colleges in rural communities may under-employ college counselors; and the acceptability of care due to the stigma associated with receiving mental health services. Additionally, the stress placed on college counselors in these settings may be higher than their more urban counterparts due to issues related to isolation and training opportunities. The presenters, all of whom have experience with college campuses embedded in rural settings, will provide a review of current literature of rural mental health and suicide, the college student experience with mental health needs and rural communities, as well as activities designed to assist current clinicians working on rural campuses with accessing resources and interventions to serve this vulnerable population.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify concerns unique to students who attend colleges in rural communities.
  • Attendees will be able to list concerns around accessibility, acceptability, and availability of mental health resources in rural communities.
  • Participants will be able to describe common issues clinicians face on rural college campuses accessing community resources for students at risk of suicide.
  • Attendees will be able to demonstrate interventions clinicians can create for building resilience in students who attend college in rural communities leading to decreased risk for suicide.

Raising Awareness and Supporting the Unique Mental Health Needs of Black Students at PWIs

Presenter(s):

Reyna Smith
University of the Cumberlands

Abstract: As mental health concerns amongst the college population continues to rise, especially following the effects the COVID-19 pandemic had on students, it can be understood that need to prioritize different methods and resources for supporting students (Lee et al., 2021). Coupled with the effects the global pandemic had on college student mental health, Black students specifically continue to carry stigma related to seeking professional help, resulting in behaviors of self-concealment, and college counseling centers will see the underutilization of services by this specific population (Masuda, 2012). Previous research examined disparities in mental health service use in the United States, indicating that White college students utilized mental health treatment at twice the rate as Black college students (Busby et al., 2019). Though efforts to create a campus climate free from racism, racially minoritized students continue to face issues of racial microaggressions, presumptive and negative stereotyping, underrepresentation, tokenization, and scrutiny (Linley, 2018). Directors and staff clinicians must better understand the unique experiences of Black students and effective strategies to better support their psychological needs. This presentation will raise awareness of specific needs rooted in historical oppression, and explore best practices through direct care, strategic hiring, collaboration with campus leaders, and outreach efforts.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will identify specific barriers to treatment faced by Black students
  • Participants will discuss best practices for supporting the mental health needs of Black students
  • Participants will describe the importance of advocating for marginalized populations who hold stigmatized beliefs related to mental health and professional help

How College Counseling Centers and Training Clinics Can Pave the Way for the Future of Telemental Health

Presenter(s):

Mario Sobrino
University of Mississippi

Alexandria Kerwin
University of Mississippi

Topic(s):

  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: In the frenzy of the COVID-19 pandemic, organizations invested heavily into their technological infrastructure and training certifications to make sure their clinicians and clients would be able to safely engage in essential telemental health services. Relevant research for telemental health has been booming and shows that we have barely scratched the surface of potential benefits while acknowledging mostly manageable risks. However, the abruptness of these changes, the underlying helplessness of a global pandemic, and the discovery of precarious factors such as "Zoom fatigue" has led to some clinicians, trainees and clients to condition a bitter taste towards telemental health. Serving the college and university community provides licensed practitioners, counselors-in-training (CITs), supervisors and clinic directors with an ideal population for telemental health: Younger clients with greater access to and experience using technology. Through the lenses of various clinical experience levels, from a university counseling center trainee up to a training clinic director, our presentation will explore the continued potential for our contemporary technologies, will discuss ways to mitigate client exhaustion of online services, and will identify what every level of practitioner needs to develop sustainable telemental health practices.

Learning Objectives:

  • Assess ways that telemental health services are continuously evolving and how college counselors / training clinics have a unique advantage for this growth.
  • Compile psychoeducation and practical skills that will allow clinicians to evaluate and facilitate resilience for clients and clinicians experiencing technology-related fatigue.
  • Analyze predictive factors for telemental health sustainability across all experience levels and opening a dialogue for telemental health experiences throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.

Are My Clients Going To Find Out I'm A Fraud: Examining Imposter Phenomenon

Presenter(s):

Tiffany Stewart
Midwestern State University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Imposter phenomenon is linked to indicators of psychological well-being. While more common than perceived, individuals who experience  imposter phenomenon suffer from avoidant psychological strain, avoidant coping strategies, and emotional exhaustion. These then lead to a lack of motivation and overall work-life satisfaction.  In this presentation we will help to combat imposter feelings and offer suggestions on learning and development interventions to use as active coping approaches.        Imposter phenomenon is linked to indicators of psychological well-being. Imposter phenomenon falsely makes individuals question their professional legitimacy and expertise.  While more common than perceived, individuals who experience imposter phenomenon suffer from avoidant psychological strain, avoidant coping strategies, and emotional exhaustion. These then lead to a lack of motivation and overall work-life satisfaction.  In this presentation we will help to combat imposter feelings and offer suggestions on learning and development interventions to use as active coping approaches to interrupt imposter experiences.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will gain information on how Imposter Phenomenon is defined and associated with psychological and mental health problems.
  • Participants will gain an understanding on the predictors of Imposter Phenomenon in mental health.
  • Participants will learn strategies for alleviating Imposter Phenomenon for psychological well-being.

Stronger Together: Supporting Generation Z College Students through Relational-Cultural Therapy

Presenter(s):

Taylor Sweet
University of Florida

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: Generation Z college students present with specific values, learning styles, and interpersonal needs.  In the last 12-18 months, they have endured sociocultural stressors of COVID-19, racial injustice, and a contentious presidential election. This presentation examines this and how college counselors' use of relational-cultural interventions can lead to collective healing.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will apply RCT interventions to promote college student mental health recovery following multiple pandemics (e.g., COVID-19, racial injustices, climate change, election process).
  • Participants will analyze how characteristics of Generation Z students apply to concepts of RCT that reflect social equity.

Barriers to Completing degrees among Ph.D. students

Presenter(s):

Hannah Whitaker
University of Alaska Fairbanks

Topic(s):

  • Research and Program Evaluation
  • Student Success

Abstract: A student faces several challenges when working towards a doctoral degree. Previous research has demonstrated that discrimination, lack of support, poor mentorship, funding issues, mental health concerns, and minority stress are barriers to degree completion. The available research also suggests that these difficulties are especially challenging for underrepresented students. Although universities are currently attempting to mitigate certain of these barriers, more can be done to understand the doctoral experience as a way of supporting students. Focus groups were conducted for this thesis to explore the barriers, strengths, and advice for others that doctoral students have at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Key findings of this study included racism, discrimination, and funding as the primary barriers to degree engagement and completion. The results also suggested the importance of effective mentorship and community support for doctoral students. Implications for students, staff and faculty, and universities are discussed. This information is important in creating a more productive and inclusive environment for doctoral students at UAF and may provide insight into the greater educational context.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe barriers to completing Ph.Ds.
  • Demonstrate knowledge surrounding underrepresented student experiences in higher education.

Creating A Culture of Care: Implementing a Integrative Wellbeing Model for Mental Health Support on a College Campus

Presenter(s):

Jennifer Whitney
UNC Greensboro

Latasha Becton
North Carolina Central University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic has presented new challenges for college counseling centers. This presentation is designed to introduce you to a method of integrative wellbeing on one university campus.  Participants will learn about methods used in this university setting to increase interventions and reach a greater number of students. Some methods discussed include utilizing workshops and other activities across campus to increase skill development in our students, faculty, and stuff. Participants will learn about approaches to cross campus collaboration designed to increase psychological connection and belonging.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify and discuss 8 dimensions of wellness and ways to utilize this framework to enhance integrative wellbeing on a college campus
  • Discuss methods to increase capacity of college counseling centers to better serve students
  • Discuss the utility of sub-clinical and/or adjunctive services in addition to or as alternatives to individual counseling in order to reach more students.

Trauma-Informed Wellness Practices for Student Residence Life Leaders

Presenter(s):

Jeni Willenzik
Agnes Scott College; Mercer University

Malavika Patel
Agnes Scott College

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention
  • Integrative Wellbeing; Campus-Wide Mental Health Initiatives

Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a physical and emotional toll on many students around the country. As many college students are returning to campuses for the first time since the outbreak of COVID-19, many students are experiencing the impact of collective trauma, vicarious trauma, and other traumas including unexpected grief and loss. Residence life leaders play an integral role in cultivating the culture on college campuses and in residence halls. Residence student leaders focus on building community and encouraging holistic wellness for students; they also often serve as one of the first responders of support for students experiencing mental health challenges. Educating college residence life student leaders (ie. resident assistants, graduate assistants) in trauma-informed wellness practices can help mitigate the impact of vicarious trauma on college campuses and prevent the escalation of student symptoms. The purpose of this presentation is to identify strategies for training and educating college residence life student leaders about trauma-informed wellness practices, in an effort to develop a trauma-informed college campus and mitigate symptoms of trauma and vicarious trauma within residence halls on college campuses.Â

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will define trauma and vicarious trauma, including signs, symptoms, and trauma's impact on college campus culture.
  • Participants will explain and identify key foundations of trauma-informed wellness practices to inform and enhance mental-health initiatives on campus.
  • Participants will discuss and apply strategies for supporting student leaders in identifying and recognizing signs of trauma in themselves and their peers.
  • Participants will be able to apply new strategies for teaching and incorporating trauma-informed wellness practices with student leaders on campus (ie. self-care strategies, attunement to others, emotional modulation, routines, and responses) in order to

Reintegration Outreach Programming: Strategies for Engaging Students on a Rural Mid-Sized Campus and Beyond

Presenter(s):

Erika Williams
Duquesne University

Margaret Spierto
Slippery Rock University

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention
  • Outreach Programming

Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has created a mirage of new challenges and stressors for college students, causing a significant decline in academic, social, and emotional self-efficacy among this population (Liu et al., 2020; Salimi et al., 2021). As students reintegrate themselves to college campuses across the nation, college counseling centers are pursuing initiatives for supporting this transition (Cuseo and Figueroa, 2020). The current presentation seeks to contribute to these initiatives by providing practical strategies for reintegration outreach at college and university campuses. Presenters will base their framework on a previously established college counseling outreach framework by Glass (2020) while integrating tips for effective outreach by Tierney et al. (2004). The theme of the current, combined framework will focus on the application of innovative and culturally diverse interventions that can meet the needs and demands of students who are reintegrating to campus following the COVID-19 pandemic.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will gain a basic understanding of the effect of COVID-19 challenges on college students' academic, social, and emotional self-efficacy.
  • Participants will be able to identify barriers to outreach success on their own college or university campuses.
  • Participants will be able to adapt and apply tenets of the current model to successfully engage students at various types of institutions.

Scaling hybrid care to better support minoritized students: Addressing mental health equity gaps on campus

Presenter(s):

Leah Goodman - Mantra Health, Previously University of Illinois Chicago

Nora Feldpausch - Wellround Provider Group; Formerly Michigan State University, Colorado State University

Donna Tran

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • DEI, mental health of historically-marginalized students, innovative programs, collaboration

Abstract: Research demonstrates the inequities that BIPOC, LGBTQIA+, and Disability communities face in accessing quality identity-affirming mental health care. With the dearth of diverse and culturally-sensitive providers nationwide, colleges and universities face challenges in meeting the needs of minoritized students. This session will explore hybrid models of care to address equity gaps on campus and provide actionable insight for campus leaders to proactively attend to the challenges minoritized students face in receiving inclusive mental health support. Through lecture, participatory discussion, and interactive activities, this session will bring higher education mental health leaders together to discuss shared challenges and set actionable goals to better support minoritized students across the country. We will review original research that highlights counseling directors' priorities and challenges, as well as new data from students about their needs, preferences, and experiences. We also review key learnings from roundtable discussions with cultural center leaders on college and university campuses. Each participant will leave the session with a clear understanding of the unmet mental health needs of minoritized students nationwide, how these needs connect to equity, and concrete action steps to implement more inclusive, impactful mental health services on campus.

Learning Objectives:

  • Gain understanding of minority students' mental health needs and barriers to accessing care on campus.
  • Define hybrid care and describe its value in equitably supporting minoritized students
  • Identify clinically-informed, collaborative approaches to expand care and commit to action steps to more comprehensively support minoritized students

Eating Disorders and College Students: Best Practices to Support Complex Students and Navigate On-Campus Treatment Challenges

Presenter(s):

Laura McLain - The Renfrew Center

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Anxiety, depression and related mental health concerns are prevalent on college campuses – students often struggle with eating disorders in tandem, yet perceived stigma, shame and "normalized" campus culture result in underreporting of behaviors among students. Intersectionality of race, identity and more must be considered by on campus resources to reduce assessment gaps. The complexities of eating disorders in college students coupled with short-term treatment limitations present unique challenges for college mental health professionals in effective assessment and intervention. This training will highlight best practices to consider these complexities in each phase of a student's treatment experience. Discussion will focus on appropriate assessment and intervention strategy, including evidence-based tools to apply in work with students utilizing on campus resources. Case studies will highlight ways to navigate treatment resistance and support beyond campus, including increased flexibility for students in a telehealth landscape.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe at least two underlying factors to consider in assessment of eating disorders in college students.
  • Identify two best practices for intervention when eating disorder behaviors are of concern.
  • Identify three evidence-based tools to utilize with students in a short-term model.
  • Identify two behavioral and medical concerns that may warrant a higher level of care.

Strategic Implementation of Mental Health Training on College Campuses

Presenter(s):

Nicole Mullis - The Jed Foundation

Leah Finch - The Jed Foundation

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention
  • Research and Program Evaluation

Abstract: For many years, staff on college campuses, often from counseling centers, have offered "Gatekeeper Training" for students, faculty, and staff focused on how to listen, support and refer students to services if/when they express mental health concerns or display concerning behavior. Most gatekeeper trainings focus on suicide prevention, but many trainings also address common mental health issues, such as depression, anxiety, and substance use. Recently, The Jed Foundation has suggested a shift from the term "Gatekeeper Training" to a more inclusive term, "Mental Health Training." This presentation will explore this shift in language and provide guidance for strategic implementation of mental health training on college campuses. This will include highlighting data supporting the need for mental health training, and provide an opportunity for participants to brainstorm ways to improve utilization, engagement, and tracking of programs on their campuses. Topics for discussion will go over the recommended content to be included in training programs, types of delivery, who should facilitate, who should be trained, and strategies to increase engagement, and track utilization.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will review and compare the various types of mental health training programs
  • Participants will analyze the data and research supporting the need for mental health training
  • Participants will cultivate ideas to increase engagement and utilization of mental health training programs on their campuses
  • Participants will be able to strategically implement a mental health training program on their campuses

Breaking the cycle of crisis care: What to do when you're caught between outpatient and the ER

Presenter(s):

Casey Tallent - ERC Pathlight

Wendy Foulds Mathes - Eating Recovery Center/Insight Behavioral Health

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: The presentation will be focused on helping clinicians determine what to do for their clients when they need more than outpatient care but don't need to be sent to the emergency room. Participants will learn to look for clues that indicate outpatient care might not be sufficient for clients. Participants will learn how to determine appropriate levels of care for mood, anxiety, trauma, and eating disorders. Clinicians will leave the presentation with a better understanding of the various supports that are available to clients needing more than outpatient care but who are not imminently at risk to themselves or others.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define levels of care for the treatment of eating, mood, and anxiety disorders
  • Discuss patient and provider barriers to moving through the levels of care for mental health treatment
  • Identify symptom profiles indicative of the need for a higher level of care for mental health treatment


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