Founded in 1991 | A division of the American Counseling Association


Saturday Breakout Sessions

February 29th, 2020

10:30am - 12pm Sessions

Session Title: #MinorityMentalHealth for Men of Color: Programming, Initiatives, and Practice-Based Possibilities for College Counselors

Presenter(s):

Christian Chan
Idaho State University

Edson Andrade
Idaho State University

Roberto Martinez
Phoenix House Mid-Atlantic

Kristian Robinson
Virginia Commonwealth University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: The explosion of trends associated with minority mental health illuminates the necessity for practicing counselors to recognize opportunities to bridge the gap for historically marginalized, underserved, and neverserved communities. Minority mental health has served as the catalyst for trends within federal regulations, college campuses, and social media (e.g., #MinorityMentalHealth) using a clear agenda to characterize the needs of minoritized communities, eradicate barriers to utilization of services, and sustain long-term systematic initiatives for comprehensive outreach, community partnerships, and counseling services (Locke et al., 2016; Miranda et al., 2015; Reif & Much, 2017). On college campuses, issues surrounding minoritized communities have been magnified due to numerous incidents of racism, discrimination, and marginalization (Chan, Erby, & Ford, 2017; Smith, Chesin, & Jeglic, 2014). Despite growth and attention, culturally responsive training and practice can direct attention to the gap for men of color within collegiate initiatives and health equity, given the phenomena of masculinity, complexities of privilege, and invisibility (Chan, Cor, & Band, 2018; Griffith, 2018). Using a synthesis of conceptual and empirical literature, the presenters focus on exemplars of collegiate initiatives to promote a collaborative dialogue with the audience on health equity, outreach, training, and utilization of counseling for men of color.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Develop an overview of key issues surrounding minority mental health initiatives specific to men of color in college campuses.
  • ·         Identify systemic barriers impacting utilization and access of men of color with college counseling services.
  • ·         Illustrate notable collegiate exemplars of programming and campaign to advocate for minority mental health associated with men of color.
  • ·         Create collaborative approaches with college counselors, supervisors, and researchers to enhance comprehensive counseling services, outreach, and health equity with men of color.

Session Title: Challenging Disablism: Promoting Inclusion of People with Disabilities and Physical Differences

Presenter(s):

Susan Powell
William James College

Libby Kain
Mayo Regional Hospital

John Smolenski
South Shore Mental Health

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations

Abstract: There is a dearth of training and research related to disability and physical difference, leaving many therapists unprepared to competently work with these populations and many unaware they need additional training to effectively serve people with disabilities (Woo, Goo, & Lee, 2016).  When training is provided it is often from the perspective of the biomedical model, which pathologizes disability as a medical problem that resides within the individual (Smart, 2015). To ensure cultural competence related to disability, therapists must be educated about the impact of disabling environments and negative attitudes on people with disabilities and physical differences, and strive to create counseling spaces free of disablist microaggressions. This presentation will review how people with disabilities are impacted by affirmative vs. stigmatizing views of disability, non-disabled privilege, stigmatizing language, and internalized ableism.  Presenters will also discuss disability-related microaggressions and recommendations for preventing such microaggressions in counseling. This presentation aims to enhance therapists' cultural competence in working with those with disabilities and physical differences, specifically related to knowledge about these populations; self-awareness of biases and/or discomfort regarding those with disabilities and physical differences; and skills related to affirmative interaction and therapy with these populations.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Describe oppression experienced by people with disabilities, including  disability-related microaggressions.
  • ·         Understand the differential clinical impact of affirming vs. stigmatizing perspectives regarding disability and physical difference.
  • ·         Identify how to prevent microaggressions in therapy.
  • ·         Identify skills for interacting with and counseling people with disabilities in a respectful and affirming manner.

Session Title: Community College Roundtable

Presenter(s):

Sandy Davis

Janelle Johnson
Sante Fe Community College

Topic(s):

  • ·         Community College Focus

Abstract: The role of the two year and community college counselor continues to evolve as student needs are being assessed and redefined on college campuses nationwide.

National data indicates that more students are arriving on community college campuses experiencing mental health concerns that clearly impact their retention and completion rates. Community and technical colleges serve many students that are first generation and academically unprepared. National trends suggest that community colleges are utilizing a wellness approach to connect with community partners and services to address other student needs outside of academics to increase retention. Some of these include, food insecurity, housing, financial, transportation, childcare, mental health connection to a psychiatrist, and health care.

As community and two year colleges continue to take a closer look at providing comprehensive student support services, it is critical for professional counselors to be involved in program development.  Counselors are often asked to perform multiple duties including teaching and academic advising, providing services to students of varying age levels and abilities, and who may be experiencing economic and employment concerns as well as physical and mental challenges.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Consider current national trends in community college counseling
  • ·         Research Component-National trends regarding comprehensive support for students to increase retention and address mental health
  • ·         Take part in active discussion of current challenges faced by colleagues working in the community college setting and ways to promote counseling services

Session Title: Identity privilege and being an effective "Ally"

Presenter(s):

Matthew Cullen
Green River College

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: Whether it is based on race, ethnicity, religion, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, weight, or ability, an Ally can be anyone with identity privilege.  However, being an Ally takes action and intention.  Theory and research on cultural competence points to the need for counselors to be aware of their own privilege and the role it plays in the counseling relationship.  And as more and more focus is given to diversity, equity, and inclusion on college campuses across the country, it is important for counselors to understand the work they can and should be doing on behalf of all students as a person of privilege.  Through discussion, interactive activities, and personal reflection, this introductory session to being an Ally will challenge participants to take an introspective look at their own identity privilege and how they can act as Allies for others.  It will outline common pitfalls of Allies and insights into effective Ally work.  Participants will leave the session understanding why being an Ally is vital to the work of a counselor in a college setting, as well as tangible strategies and specific actions they can take to be an Ally on their campus.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will be able to define identity privilege and describe their own identity privilege.
  • ·         Participants will apply the strategies discussed in the session to list the steps they will take on their college campus to close the equity gap.
  • ·         Participants will be able to identify resources for being an ally for various groups.

Session Title: Mindful self-care for counselors:  Creating and maintaining a sustainable mindfulness practice

Presenter(s):

Diana Cusumano
The Jed Foundation

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Recognizing that self-care is key for counselors in order for them to maintain their own emotional wellness and mental health, this session will focus on introducing mindfulness techniques that can be used regularly with oneself and with students.  This interactive workshop will be a combination of information sharing, testing out several different evidence based mindfulness techniques and include discussion based on the Koru Mindfulness curriculum. An overview of the Koru Mindfulness curriculum will be provided along with recent research published surrounding mindfulness and how it affects one's mental health.  A discussion and brainstorm will take place on how to infuse mindfulness and meditation into daily life.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will be able to define mindfulness and meditation along with practicing different mindfulness exercises.
  • ·         Participants will be able to compile a list of the benefits of mindfulness and meditation and how it ties to mental health.
  • ·         Participants will be taught the most recent research published on mindfulness as it ties to stress reduction and mental health and be able to use this in building their own case for creating a daily mindfulness habit and/or creating mindfulness programmin
  • ·         Participants will have an overview of the Koru Mindfulness curriculum and be able to apply techniques on themselves and with students and staff.

Session Title: Prescribing nature for mental health on college campuses

Presenter(s):

Susan Denny
University of Texas at San Antonio

Jack Wheeler
Denison University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Administrative

Abstract: According to the 2018 annual report by the Center for Collegiate Mental Health (CCMH, 2019), the most common problems college clients report are anxiety and depression. College counseling centers are exploring innovative methods to provide effective treatments that address these concerns. Increasingly, research is finding that engagement with nature helps to reduce stress associated with many mental health concerns (Rakow & Eells, 2019). Nature is an untapped resource on campuses that engages students in group work, increases students' sense of belonging, and reduces stress.  The Collegiate Adventure Therapy Collective (CATC) is a group of college counselors whose mission is to intentionally integrate nature into their treatment with clients. Clinicians integrate eco therapy and adventure therapy to meet the unique needs posed by their campus community. While this approach is a new trend for counseling centers, 191 colleges offer wilderness orientation programs that have shown to have a positive effect on autonomy, interpersonal skills, and sense of belonging (Bell, et al., 2014; Bell & Chang, 2017).   This presentation highlights how two colleges developed nature-based therapy programs. Participants will have time to explore what nature-based therapy could look like on their own campuses and to discuss first steps for implementing the program.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Describe eco therapy and adventure therapy.
  • ·         Identify three benefits to prescribing nature for college students.
  • ·         Compare different models of how to bring nature-based therapy to your campus.
  • ·         Brainstorm what nature-based therapy model may work on your campus.
  • ·         Formulate next steps for your campus' nature-based therapy program.

Session Title: The Good, the bad, and the ugly of providing supervision to counseling students

Presenter(s):

KATHERINE Bender BENDER
Bridgewater State University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Clinical Supervision and Training

Abstract: Through the lens of of the discrimination model of supervision (Bernard & Goodyear, 1992) the session will address the challenges and joys of providing supervision to counseling internship students. Practical components of using evaluation tools like competency rating scales, mid term reviews, and a rubric for counselor dispositions will be discussed. Tips for having challenging conversations with interns and their faculty or site supervisors will be shared using case studies. With an emphasis on the role of supervisors as gatekeepers but also with the role of interns as student learners, the session will outline the fine balance between supporting and challenging our interns within clinical supervision.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Attendees will assess their current supervision practice and model and evaluate its effectivness.
  • ·         Attendees will apply CACREP counselor dispositions and counseling skills rating scales to their current supervision setting.
  • ·         Attendees will utilize available resources to bring back to their home institutions and supervision practice.

Session Title: The Intersection of Counseling and Accessibility: Understanding the who, what, when, and why of accommodation requests.

Presenter(s):

Dan Jordan
Gwyned Mercy University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: Student mental health issues often affect academics in profound ways and necessitate referrals to other campus resources such as the accessibility office. Counselors can be faced with a need to address the client's accessibility needs but lack an understanding of the basics of accessibility. Counselors need to have a working knowledge of the laws involved, the definitions used, and how to apply them to their clients' academic and housing needs. It is imperative counselors be able to identify which client issues apply, what should be recommend as an accommodation, and what information is needed for documentation. Further, it is essential they have a basic understanding of the legal, practical, and ethical implications of their accommodation recommendations so that they can advocate for accessibility for their clients and collaborate effectively with accessibility offices.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will be able to apply a practical understanding of the relevant laws governing students with disabilities using practical examples.
  • ·         Participants will apply that understating to create reasonable accommodations according their client's needs, and explain their accommodation recommendations and potential limits to implementing them.
  • ·         Participants will be able to write appropriate documentation to support their recommendations.
  • ·         Participants will be able to navigate the issues involved in requests for emotional support animals, single room accommodations, and presentation modifications, as well as, assess ethical considerations and make recommendations for best practices.

Session Title: The Loneliness Epidemic in the College Population: Research-Based Guidelines to Educate, Engage, and Counsel

Presenter(s):

Jacob Blackstock
University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Nearly half of Americans report being lonely, and one-in-five report having no close relationships (Ipsos Reid, 2018). The numbers are concerning for all age ranges, but particularly high for young adults (Ipsos Reid, 2018). The increase in loneliness has been paired with an increase in students seeking services and an increase in crisis cases (Center for Collegiate Mental Health, 2017). Considering these trends, it is vital that college counselors understand the causes of loneliness and young adults and practical ways to educate students and promote wellness. The presentation will begin with an overview of national data about loneliness, highlighting trends in isolation and a review of the clinical significance of loneliness. This will include data about negative outcomes and the clinical definition of loneliness. Next the presenter will explain the role attachment plays in loneliness, highlighting the role of attachment style as well as attachment physiology. After that the presenter will cover recent empirical data about loneliness and attachment and highlight a proposed structural regression model of loneliness in young adults. The presenter will also discuss evidence-based treatments for loneliness. Finally, the presenter will include ideas for psychoeducation and student engagement as well as effective ways to screen for loneliness.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants should be able to discuss the importance of addressing loneliness and how social connection moves students towards wellness
  • ·         Participants should be able to describe the role that attachment and changing national trends play in loneliness
  • ·         Participants should be able to apply knowledge about campus loneliness to student engagement and counseling


1:30pm - 3:00pm Sessions

Session Title: Animals on Campus: Ethical, Legal, and Logistical Considerations

Presenter(s):

Kathryn Alessandria
West Chester University

Christopher S. Corbett
Savannah College of Art and Design

Stephanie D. McIver
University of New Mexico

Shari A. Robinson
University of New Hampshire

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues
  • ·         There will be an emphasis on ethical issues in the presentation.

Abstract: This session will model the interdisciplinary collegiality and collaborative process of the Higher Education Mental Health Alliance (HEMHA), which includes representatives from 9 organizations that focus on higher education policy and university/college student mental health.  This collaboration has resulted in several free white papers useful to practitioners and administrators alike. We present our latest guide: Animals on Campus. We will: 1) discuss the purpose, scope and limitations of the guide; 2) explain the differences between service, therapy, and emotional support animals and the legal rights of access for each one; and, 3) using the guide's case vignettes as a launching point we will review risks and legal and ethical issues associated with animals on campus, including accommodating and approving requests for Emotional Support Animals (ESAs). We will highlight key content on this topic, including the recent ACA position statement on ESAs, and solicit feedback to identify clinical practice gaps that may influence the topics of future guides. The presentation will be delivered via visual slides, didactics, and interactive discussion.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         be able to describe what the Higher Education Mental Health Alliance is and how to access the free resources it provides;
  • ·         be able to identify logistical and ethical dilemmas related to animals on campus;
  • ·         identify the differences between service animals, therapy animals, and emotional support animals and the current regulations related to each.
  • ·         discuss their own experiences with animals on campus.

Session Title: Assessing For and Building a Resiliency Plan Against Compassion Fatigue

Presenter(s):

V. Paige Zeiger
Walden University

Yulanda Tyre
Liberty University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Due to the sustained empathic relationship inherent in therapy, mental health counselor's belief system and world view are vulnerable to the effects of the traumatic and debilitating experiences of clients. These effects can be pervasive and may lead to personal and professional difficulties. Left unattended, the cumulative effects of clinical work may put the counselor at risk for both Compassion Fatigue and Vicarious Trauma. This presentation will address these concerns through helping attendees gain awareness of the clinical factors that may contribute to the experience of compassion fatigue, secondary traumatic stress, vicarious trauma, and burnout.  While each of these concepts are defined differently, obtaining an awareness of how to identify and be self-aware of when one is experiencing the signs and symptoms is essential for ethical, competent clinical counseling practice.  There are a variety of risk factors for compassion fatigue, but there are also some recognition strategies that professional helpers can integrate into their practice that will help them mitigate and prevent burnout.  Clinicians and supervisors will learn how to assess for compassion fatigue and build a resiliency plan for combatting it in order to ensure wellness.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Develop a clear understanding of what signs and symptoms demonstrate compassion fatigue, vicarious trauma, and burnout.
  • ·         Exhibit the ability to skillfully administer and interpret compassion fatigue assessments, such as the Pro QOL, and the competence to recognize key resiliency skills for the prevention of compassion fatigue.
  • ·         Create an effective resiliency plan for addressing compassion fatigue, burnout, and vicarious trauma and the demonstrate the ability to implement these new skills towards preventing it.

Session Title: Chartering Collegiate Initiatives for Mental Health and Wellness with Queer and Trans People of Color (QTPOC) in College Counseling and Student Affairs: An Intersectional Approach

Presenter(s):

Christian Chan
Idaho State University

Margarita Martinez
Northern Virginia Community College - Counseling Center

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: A growing body of conceptual and empirical research has bolstered efforts to address the mental health and wellness of queer and trans people of color (QTPOC) with attention to the evidence of marginalization, suicidality, and health disparities (Mosley et al., 2019). With this area needing attention under the auspices of college counseling and student affairs settings, collegiate initiatives, programming, and outreach operate under a comprehensive approach to illustrate multiple overlapping forms of oppression (e.g., racism, genderism, heterosexism) responsible for inequities and barriers to resources and services (Chan et al., 2017a, 2017b). Distinctly, the social conditions associated with health inequities and barriers govern access and climate of safety on college campuses (Moon Johnson & Javier, 2017). Such experiences for QTPOC coincide with two particular frameworks to critically analyze both barriers and opportunities for programming and services: minority stress theory (Meyer, 2014) and intersectionality theory (Collins, 1986, 2015; Crenshaw, 1989). Outlining approaches for college counseling and student affairs specifically using the intersectionality framework, the presenters will highlight exemplar programs for college counseling, outreach, and student affairs; indicate culturally responsive practices tailored to college counseling and student affairs; and develop a collaborative dialogue with the audience for relevant practice applications across college settings.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Illustrate an overview of salient statistics, conceptual, and empirical research to document effects of oppression and resilience on queer and trans college students of color.
  • ·         Identify specific community and advocacy resources culturally relevant to queer and trans college students of color.
  • ·         Elaborate on the significance of minority stress theory and intersectionality theory as useful frameworks for college counseling and student affairs practices.
  • ·         Outline distinct exemplars of college programming relevant to services and outreach for queer and trans college students of color.
  • ·         Formulate culturally responsive practices necessary for college counselors, supervisors, and researchers to address interpersonal, systemic, and historical forms of oppression for queer and trans college students of color on campus.

Session Title: Cognitive Processing Therapy on a Community College Campus

Presenter(s):

Brittany Palacios
Del Mar College

Johanna Torres
Del Mar College

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Community College Focus

Abstract: In this presentation, participants will acquire information on the prevalence of trauma on community college campuses and learn about an evidenced based treatment for trauma and comorbid conditions – Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT). Participants will learn about its efficacy with students as well as the benefits and barriers involved in the therapeutic application within a community college setting. This includes the use of CPT to prevent burnout. Presenters will also discuss the burnout epidemic and coping strategies for college clinicians treating trauma.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will acquire knowledge about the prevalence of trauma on community college campuses.
  • ·         Participants will acquire knowledge about Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) and its efficacy in a community college counseling center.
  • ·         Participants will learn about the utilization of CPT to prevent burnout amongst clinicians in a college setting.
  • ·         Participants will gain an understanding of how to cope with the inevitability of burnout.

Session Title: Life Stressors and Overall Mental Wellness in Black Men

Presenter(s):

Damon Pryor
William James College

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations

Abstract: The primary aim of this study was to explore the experiences of being a Black man in the United States by identifying the salient themes that are related to life-stressors and the factors that promote well-being among Black men. The research questions that were investigated include the following: (1) What are some stressors that Black men experience in this country? (2) What concepts are salient to Black men's sense of well-being? And (3) What roles do supports from others (e.g., emotional, academic and physical support from fathers, teachers, and mentors) play in promoting well-being among Black men? Through the use of a semi-structured interview and Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), the researcher identified recurrent themes of the lived experiences of the participants. The results of this study suggest that salient themes that are shared among Black men and that promote their well-being are linked to the importance of the Black family, activities of survival, maintaining a healthy body, and fostering a healthy mindset. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of their relevance to future research and clinical work with Black men in the United States.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         The Learner will be able to describe the salient factors of well-being as they relate to Black men.
  • ·         The learner will be ale to assess their role and abilities to form therapeutic relationships with Black men.
  • ·         The learner will be able to discuss the mental health disparities that exist in America for Black men.

Session Title: Roundtable discussion on  the NCAA Mental Health Best Practices.

Presenter(s):

Joshua Mangin
Husson University

Andrew Southerland
University of Wyoming

Topic(s):

  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: In 2013, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) created a task-force designed on addressing the mental health concerns of student-athletes. The outcome of this task-force resulted in recommended guidelines including: usage of licensed mental health providers, implementation of proper referrals, incorporating pre-participation mental health screenings, and fostering culture changes through wellness and health promotion outreach.  As mental health professionals we work on interdisciplinary teams to provide services for specific college population including student athletes. Over the last few years, there has been an increase in amateur and professional athletes openly discussing their struggles with mental health. Research has demonstrated that student-athletes experience higher rates of depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and eating disorders when compared to their non-athlete counterparts. Therefore, as professionals, it is important to know the recommended roles and current suggested best practices.  The purpose of this breakout session is to provide an opportunity to discuss how college counselors incorporate and utilize these guidelines into our institutions. This will be accomplished through the use of a roundtable discussion. We feel that a roundtable format will allow attendees to join the presenters in sharing their own perceptions, experiences, and implementations regarding the NCAA's Mental Health Best Practices.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will understand the key components to the NCAA's Mental Health Best Practices.
  • ·         Participants will partake in a roundtable discussion of the NCAA's Mental Health Best Practices with the purpose of sharing current implementation, and fostering interventions, policies, and practices, that can be incorporated into the participants' own i

Session Title: Socially Just and Cultural Responsive Counseling Leadership Model:

Presenter(s):

Harvey Peters
The George Washington University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Administrative

Abstract: This presentation will focus on the results from a grounded theory study investigating how counseling leaders' engage in leadership that is both socially just and culturally responsive. To date, no study in counseling has focused on counseling leadership that is both socially just and culturally responsive. Thus, the purpose of this grounded theory study was to explore the phenomenon of socially just and culturally responsive counseling leadership within both educational and professional contexts. This presentation will provide session participants with a brief introduction to the literature, essential definitions, an overview of the methodology and study procedures, results of the study, and its future implications. These session objectives will be accomplished through a didactic presentation and handouts using PowerPoint. In addition, session participants will have an opportunity to engage in a think-pair-share discussion on how to create action strategies in their leadership, research, or service within a college counseling setting. As a result, session participants will be exposed to, reflect upon, and discuss with the implications of socially just and culturally responsive leadership, and how to develop tangible actions within their unique professional context.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will receive and discuss the results from a grounded theory study focused on socially just and culturally responsive counseling leadership.
  • ·         Participants will identify and discuss the implications for their own leadership in college counseling settings.
  • ·         Participants will be able to describe and explain socially just and culturally responsive leadership within the context of college counseling settings.
  • ·         Participants will compare the results and implications of the study to their own experiences and narratives.

Session Title: Stigma on Campus: Impacts on Help Seeking and Academic Progress

Presenter(s):

Kimberly Gorman
Western Carolina University

Kathleen Brennan
Western Carolina University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Research and Program Evaluation

Abstract: The increase in utilization of services on campus has been attributed, in part, to the belief that stigma around mental health had decreased. However, the exact nature of stigma and its relationship to help seeking has not been fully studied. This program offers data from a sample of students at a rural, regional university situated in the southeast. This study provided data regarding the endorsement of public stigma dimensions used within the sociology literature, and then linked that data, with students' consent, to information from the university's counseling center and from the academic record. This program will discuss university student endorsement of stigma as compared to the broader national and international contexts. Additionally, this session will also discuss the relationship between stigma, utilization of counseling services, and academic progress.  The program will conclude with suggestions as to how to discuss stigma and its impact on students and the campus community with students, faculty/staff, and administrators.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         1. Explain the similarities and differences in endorsement of stigma by university students and the general population.
  • ·         2. Articulate two ways in which stigma impacts treatment seeking.
  • ·         3. Identify two strategies for discussing stigma on campus.

Session Title: Title:  You are Not a Fraud: Helping Latinx First-Generation College Students Combat Imposter Syndrome

Presenter(s):

Jacqueline Contreras
The University of Texas at San Antonio

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Latinx commonly identify as first-generation college students (FGCS) (Michel & Durdella, 2019). This population has a difficult time navigating through college without the guidance of their parents, but they also face an internal struggle that undervalues their successes by attributing them to luck. They experience imposter syndrome (Martinez et al. 2009; Terenzini et al., 1996). IS is a collection of unwanted feelings that include intellectual mistrust, fear of failing, and feeling incompetent (Clance & O'Toole, 1987). Imposter syndrome often causes mental health issues for Latinx FGCS. Their irrational thoughts and feelings transform themselves into anxiety (Cokley et al., (2017), depression (Clance & Imes, 1978; Cokley et al, 2017), and low self-esteem (Thompson, Davis, & Davidson, 1998). If not addressed, these mental health issues can potentially derail FGCS from graduating college (Ramsey & Brown, 2018). It is important to discuss strategies to assist this population and decrease graduation retention. The presenter will introduce and discuss effective techniques staff and faculty can practice on Latinx FGCS who are experiencing imposter syndrome in higher education.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will gain an understanding of what imposter syndrome is and its effects on Latinx first-generation college students.
  • ·         Participants will gain strategies to help Latinx first-generation college students experiencing imposter syndrome.


3:30pm - 5:00pm Sessions

Session Title: Beyond the Walls: Creating Minority Serving Counseling Centers(MSCC) at Predominately White Institutions (PWI).

Presenter(s):

Damon Pryor
William James College

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Research and Program Evaluation

Abstract: The primary aim of this analysis was to explore the experiences of people of color enrolled in college at Minority Serving Institutions (MSI) and at Predominately White Institutions (PWI). This occurred by examining research related to their stressors, disparities, and overall educational outcome. The purpose of was to answer the following questions: (1) What are the barriers to success for students at PWIs and (2) How can college counseling centers aid in overcoming these barriers. Through the use of literary analysis core issues such as Racial/Ethnic prejudice, Financial Barriers, Homogenous Learning Environment/Imposter Syndrome and the feeling of being insignificant were identified. The results of this analysis suggest that there are fundamental changes that can occur in most college counseling centers to improve the outcomes of underrepresented college students. These solutions have been organized into three categories: (1) Staff training and composition, (2) Center policies and procedures, (3) Theoretical Orientation and Services. The implication of these categories are discussed in terms of their relevance to the clinical work of the college counseling centers with underrepresented population.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Learners will be able to apply tactics to improve their ability to serve people of color and other underrepresented populations.
  • ·         Learners will be able to analyze their counseling centers theoretical approach as it related to the servicing of people of color and other underrepresented populations.
  • ·         Learners will be able to design effective programming to better aid people of color and other underrepresented populations.
  • ·         Learner will be able to create effective multicultural outlooks for their counseling center.

Session Title: Considerations for College Counselors in the #MeToo Era

Presenter(s):

Courtney Walters
North Carolina State University

Samantha Lohorn
North Carolina State University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Sexual assault is a pervasive issue on every college campus. According to RAINN, 11.2% of all college students experience rape or sexual assault through physical force, violence, or incapacitation. The #MeToo movement has drawn attention to the widespread impact of sexual violence, and a number of highly publicized cases (e.g., Harvey Weinstein, Bill Cosby, Brett Kavanaugh) have kept these conversations at the forefront. While reactions to #MeToo range from healing to retraumatizing, it is clear that this movement has had significant impacts on survivors of sexual assault. College counselors need to be aware of these impacts, knowledgeable about trauma and competent to work with clients who identify as survivors, and advocates for survivors and the prevention of sexual violence on their campuses. This presentation will provide an overview of statistics related to campus sexual assault and discuss the impacts of the #MeToo movement on survivors. A trauma-informed approach and six trauma-specific interventions will be discussed, followed by recommendations for trauma-informed practice. It will conclude with an interactive discussion about ideas for advocacy and sexual assault education and prevention.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Review statistics on campus sexual assault.
  • ·         Discuss impact of #MeToo on sexual assault survivors.
  • ·         Describe a trauma-informed approach and six trauma-specific interventions.
  • ·         Provide recommendations for trauma-informed practice.
  • ·         Discuss ideas for advocacy and strategies for prevention and education on college campuses.

Session Title: Dogs, Stress, and Tests, Oh My! A Wellness Program for Students Taking a High Stakes Test

Presenter(s):

Kathryn Alessandria
West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Topic(s):

  • ·         Wellness and Prevention
  • ·         Other (please explain in "comments" box below)
  • ·         Animal Assisted Intervention (AAI)

Abstract: Animal Assisted Interventions (AAI) are growing in popularity and practice with therapeutic outreach being the most common type on college campuses. AAI has grown in popularity for its low cost and ability to reach many people with few resources. Research indicates that elevated perceived stress prior to high stakes tests is associated with lower predicted grades, feelings of being less prepared for exams, and a negative view of courses completed. Too much stress and anxiety can influence test performance. Studies have demonstrated a reduction in stress levels associated with participant interactions with therapy dogs in clinical settings. Research suggests that interacting with a therapy animal can lower anxiety and loneliness and that outreach programs can be a way to assist students on campus whose stress and anxiety may not warrant ongoing counseling. The purpose of this program is to share knowledge gained from evaluation of an AAI wellness program for students taking a high stakes test. Audience members will be invited to exchange outreach and wellness promotion program ideas and ways to appropriately incorporate AAI on campus.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Describe a wellness program implemented for students taking a high stakes test.
  • ·         Discuss research on the effectiveness of interacting with a certified therapy dog on student stress and anxiety during high stakes testing.
  • ·         Identify practical strategies to implement animal assisted intervention on college campuses
  • ·         Identify at least three considerations (e.g. animal and human welfare, selecting appropriate animals for programs, etc.) that must be addressed prior to incorporating therapy dogs in outreach programming.

Session Title: Helping Student-Athletes Tackle Mental Health

Presenter(s):

Bethany Garr
Converse College

Raphaela Shea Fontana
Prisma Health System

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: While college counseling centers around the country see an influx of students seeking services, one population that remains difficult to reach are student-athletes. Although participation in athletics can serve as a protective factor for many students, athletes are certainly not immune to mental health conditions. In fact, some researchers have suggested that athletes may be especially susceptible to certain disorders, including ADHD, eating disorders, and substance abuse disorders. Further, although participation in sports is often beneficial for athletes, student also face unique challenges and risks associated as a result of athletics, including injuries, bullying and hazing, and stigma around mental health concerns. This presentation will focus on the socioecological, physical, and emotional factors contributing to the development of mental health concerns in athletes, as well as ways to improve student-athletes' access to mental health services.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will be able to identify athlete-specific factors that may contribute to the development of or exacerbate mental health symptoms
  • ·         Participants will be able to describe conditions primarily specific to athletes, including overtraining syndrome, post-concussive syndrome, female athlete triad, and athlete response to injuries
  • ·         Participants will be able to compare the prevalence and presentation of mental health concerns in athletes with the general college student population
  • ·         Participants will be able to identify the barriers and facilitators to seeking mental health treatment among student athletes
  • ·         Participants will be able to name strategies that may be employed to improve access to mental health services for student-athletes

Session Title: Introduction to CAS Standards for Counseling Services: Uses for the College Counseling Centers

Presenter(s):

Perry Francis
Eastern Michigan University

Lisa Adams
University of West Georgia

Topic(s):

  • ·         Administrative
  • ·         Other (please explain in "comments" box below)
  • ·         Program Evaluation

Abstract: The Council for the Advancement for Standards in Higher Education has well developed specialty standards for college counseling centers that can be used in numerous ways including advocating for support for the center, self-assessment, program evaluation, outcome research, and staff development. This presentation will provide the participants with the necessary information to begin the process of planning a CAS self-study including tailoring it to meet the diverse needs of the profession.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         To increase the knowledge and use of CAS standards and guidelines, particularly as related to Counseling Services.
  • ·         To develop awareness of CAS and of the functional area standards
  • ·         To learn and list the standards and guidelines for Counseling Services and of their uses for self-study and assessment of counseling services
  • ·         To develop comfort with using learning and development outcomes in counseling practice

Session Title: Riding the Wellness Wave: Clarifying and Affirming the Role of the Counseling Center on Today's Campuses

Presenter(s):

Teresa Michaelson-Chmelir
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Gary Glass
Oxford College of Emory University

Rebecca Rampe
University of North Carolina - Willmington

Batsirai Bvunzawabaya
University of Pennsylvania

Megan Marks
University of Kentucky

Deidre Weathersby
Univeristy of Illinois

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: The release of the well-being commitment statements by NASPA and NIRSA in 2018 builds on increased interest in well-being programming across departments within universities, adding to efforts of wellness centers, health promotion departments, and counseling centers. This trend involves all of these units addressing issues of mental health, emphasizing collaboration and integration of efforts. For some university counseling center professionals, this trend adds useful campus partnerships to help in meeting the many campus needs related to well-being. For others, this trend prompts questions about the role, function, and value of the counseling center including our role as clinical providers and outreach providers and health consultants.  This program examines the role and function of outreach as an integral component of counseling center that integrates with clinical services, consultation to the campus community, and education on issues impacting student development and wellbeing.  In addition, this session will offer participants a way to clarify their role and articulate the unique counseling center contributions toward these collaborative efforts ensuring that student needs are being addressed in a comprehensive and holistic manner.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Describe the traditional  and current roles of college counseling centers.
  • ·         Describe current clinical services and outreach and consultation efforts in a historical context of prevention work within college counseling centers
  • ·         Identify specific language and strategies that illustrate the unique roles and expertise of counseling center professionals in the promotion of overall student well-being, resilience and thriving.

Session Title: Serving Veteran and Military-Connected Students: Social, Cultural, and Practice Implications

Presenter(s):

Sarah Clapp
The Ohio State University

Emily Baker
The Ohio State University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Our presentation will highlight unique social and cultural contexts for working with veteran and military-connected students, and discuss both cultural competency and evidence-based practice for working clinically with this population.

Abstract: Service in the United States military is characterized by unique social and cultural experiences, including particular language, hierarchies, social norms, and value systems. These cultural characteristics are distinct from American civilian culture, and indicate a need for cultural competency to serve veterans and military-connected persons effectively in clinical settings. The vast majority of post-secondary institutions in the United States enroll veteran and military-connected students, however research suggest both a lack of military-specific resources on campus and limited military cultural competence among counselors. This presentation will provide a foundational of knowledge of military culture, discuss evidence-based approaches to serving these students, and elaborate on further opportunities and resources for training.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Describe the social and cultural considerations and contexts that must be taken into account when working with veterans and military-connected persons in higher education.
  • ·         Analyze additional intersectional and diversity factors relevant to serving veteran and military-connected persons in higher education.
  • ·         Discuss evidence-based and culturally-sensitive clinical approaches for working with veteran and military-connected persons in higher education.

Session Title: Utilizing CAMS for the Assessment and Treatment of Suicidal Students in a University Counseling Center

Presenter(s):

Ashlyn Jones
Cairn University

Rachel Previte
Cairn University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Clinical Supervision and Training

Abstract: Accurately and effectively identifying and treating suicidal risk is a primary concern for university counseling center directors, staff and administration. The Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS) offers a framework in which to assess and treat suicidal ideation and behavior. The CAMS model first offers a philosophy of care as well as an empirically supported intervention and suicide specific approach. The goal of the session is to introduce the model, the basics of utilizing CAMS and how it is used in assessment and treatment of suicidal clients in a university counseling center.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will evaluate the CAMS model and its effectiveness within a university counseling center.
  • ·         Participants will articulate an understanding of the philosophy of care that CAMS outlines and how it serves suicidal clients.
  • ·         Participants will conceptualize two opportunities to integrate the model or the philosophy of care into their counseling centers.

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