Founded in 1991 | A division of the American Counseling Association


Sunday Breakout Sessions

March 1st, 2020

8:30am - 10:00am Sessions

Session Title: Bloom Where You Are Planted: A Community College Counseling Center

Presenter(s):

Kathryn Robb
College of Lake County

Topic(s):

  • ·         Community College Focus

Abstract: Colleges nation-wide continue to increase access to mental health services on campus for students, and community colleges in particular face a unique set of barriers (Eisenberg et al., 2019). This interactive workshop will demonstrate how the College of Lake County (CLC) is responding to extensive, unique mental health needs, from initiating mental health services, to building a Center.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Develop a richer understanding of the unique Community College mental health needs.
  • ·         Recognize barriers and strategies regarding mental health needs in a Community College.
  • ·         Identify future needs, and areas for Community College counseling center expansion.

Session Title: Necessity is the Mother of Invention:  How creative programming helped us meet our students' increased need for wellness and prevention services.

Presenter(s):

Erin Ryan
St. John's University

Ruth DeRosa
St. John's University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: As college counseling centers continue to face an increased demand for their services in a climate of budget cuts, creative measures are needed to meet the needs of our students.  Mindfulness meditation has demonstrated benefits to mental and physical health, but engaging students in traditional meditation practices can be challenging.   We have had success in engaging our students in brief stress-relieving activities that largely rely on mindfulness through the senses (e.g., Mandala coloring, kinetic sand play, and interaction with therapy dogs).  We also train Wellness Peer Educators in mindfulness exercises so they can be ambassadors to our overall message. These programs have been established with relatively low cost and have helped us to stretch the reach of our Wellness Department to more students.  Students are able to engage in the stress-relieving activity, learn about resources available to them on campuses, and learn techniques that they can easily continue on their own.  This workshop will be experiential, interactive, and didactic.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will be able to list the potential benefits of a creative stress-relief program for college students.
  • ·         Participants will be able to plan cost-effective and creative stress-relief programming for college students.

Session Title: The Integration of Intersectional Identity within Clinical Supervision

Presenter(s):

Heather Bense
Rowan College of South Jersey

Topic(s):

  • ·         Clinical Supervision and Training

Abstract: This workshop will discuss of the importance clinical supervision has on the integration of a clinical social worker's intersectional identity into their work, examine the theoretical foundations to support this integration, and offer strategies that can be infused into current clinical supervision practice to foster this growth.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Develop an understanding of what intersectional identity is and how it informs and impacts the work of clinical supervision;
  • ·         Develop an understanding of the key theoretical foundations that support helpful clinical supervision;
  • ·         Gain strategies to increase the integration of intersectional identity for clinical supervisees within their existing clinical supervision practice.

Session Title: Threat assessment and management on college campuses

Presenter(s):

Jamie Hagenbaugh
Thomas Jefferson University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: This presentation will focus on helping clinicians to understand threat assessment and how it is used on college campuses. It will review the types of individuals that make threats and differences between affective and predatory violence. Additionally, the presentation will help clinicians develop an awareness of the pathway to violence and potential warning behaviors along the pathway. Finally, the presentation will highlight interview and management strategies that are used in threat assessment.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will be able to discuss differences between affective and predatory violence.
  • ·         Participants will be able to describe the pathway to violence and its application in threat assessment
  • ·         Participants will be able to list warning behaviors of individuals who may engage in targeted violence

Session Title: Worried to Death: The Anxiety Epidemic and What to Do About It

Presenter(s):

Emily Holmes
Greensboro College

Topic(s):

  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: It is a well-known fact that college students are experiencing anxiety at higher levels than ever before, and research has linked increased anxiety to numerous negative outcomes. Furthermore, chronic stress and anxiety can have disastrous consequences on the brain and the body, especially when accompanied by insufficient sleep and inadequate self-care. Many have speculated about the causes of the anxiety epidemic, and too often the focus has been placed on the failure of individuals rather than on the larger cultural contexts, both on and off campus, that have contributed to this complex issue. While it is true that students appear to be more prone to anxiety, it is also true that students are facing greater challenges academically, socially, financially, and professionally than those of previous decades. Additionally, one cannot overlook the significant interplay between stress, anxiety, and the brain when considering the anxiety epidemic and what to do about it. In this session, we will explore the complex issue of anxiety, including prevalence, consequences, physiology, and cultural contributors. We will also discuss strategies for effecting change on campus beyond individual counseling by focusing on campus culture and how we educate, communicate with, and support students.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will be able to discuss the prevalence of anxiety and associated negative outcomes.
  • ·         Participants will be able to explain the neurobiological processes related to anxiety.
  • ·         Participants will be able to describe cultural contributors to anxiety, both on and off campus.
  • ·         Participants will be able to start creating a plan for change on their campuses based on the recommendations provided.

Session Title: You, me, and school make three: Addressing the needs of graduate student couples using the Sound Relationship House model

Presenter(s):

Anthony Suarez
Valparaiso University

Jessica Del Re

Allison Bodine
Valparaiso University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations

Abstract: The pursuit of a graduate degree is a major life event that can take its toll on the individual student. For those students who are in committed relationships, their spouses or partners may also feel the effects of graduate study. This creates a unique set of challenges that graduate students and their partners must learn to navigate. If not addressed, these challenges may threaten marital stability and affect students' academic progress. Counselors and counselor educators should be aware of these challenges and look for ways to provide support for married or partnered students. Gottman (1999) introduced the Sound Marital House (now known as the Sound Relationship House, SRH) model to help couples identify potential issues with their marriages and strategies to improve marital satisfaction. Rockinson-Szpakiw, Spaulding, and Knight (2015) applied techniques from the SRH model with graduate students and their spouses. Through a discussion of research findings, this program looks to expand on this by fully addressing the phenomenon of graduate student couples through the SRH framework and will include recommendations for students, counselors, and counselor educators to enhance relationship stability and promote academic success. A student presenter will also share her experience of being married while in graduate school.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Describe specific issues facing married or partnered graduate students
  • ·         Prepare students to navigate challenges of graduate school while in committed relationships
  • ·         Apply Sound Relationship House concepts when working with married or partnered graduate students


10:30am - 12:00pm Sessions

Session Title: Developing a Psychology of Wellness Class to Increase College Student Wellbeing

Presenter(s):

Carrie Caudill
Newberry College

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Wellness in college life is foundational for promoting mental health and resilience. Wellness models provide individuals with an understanding of how a multidimensional, strength-based approach to self-examination can contribute to greater functioning overall in life.   First this workshop will discuss the PERMA model (Positive emotion, engagement, positive relationships, meaning, accomplishment) for wellness.   Best practices for how to integrate this model into a college population will be reviewed.  Special attention will be given to inclusion of diverse and first-generation college student populations.  Lastly, the presenter will share research findings related to pre and post holistic wellness scores after a wellness education and coursework.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Evaluate the PERMA wellness model and apply concepts to college students and self.
  • ·         Describe method for developing a course to increase college student wellness.
  • ·         Analyze and describe how wellness education interventions can consider diverse backgrounds.
  • ·         Utilize the research from the pre/post test interventions to evaluate wellness course effectiveness.

Session Title: Exploring How Generational and Career Developmental Influences Intersect in College Counseling Centers

Presenter(s):

Jennifer Barch
Clarion University of PA

Briana Steele
Clarion University of PA

Topic(s):

  • ·         Clinical Supervision and Training
  • ·         Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: Who makes the best college counselor – older, younger, more or less experience in the field?  As each generation changes and moves through career and personal development stages, college counseling centers may take on a new feel.  Some may feel the pressure to "do things like we always have" and some may feel the pressure to "meet students where they're at."  We will explore how college counseling centers can efficiently meet the needs of students they serve while tapping into the strengths of its counselors.  By examining the intersection of career development stages with generational characteristics, we can find innovative approaches to our counseling practices that targets both service delivery and promotes harmony in the workplace. In this presentation, we will discuss the basics of career development theory, aspects of multiple generations of workers, and how the two influence one another in a college counseling setting.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         1. Participants will be able to identify the basic stages of Super's Life-Span, Life-Space Theory of Career Development
  • ·         2. Participants will be able to name basic generational characteristics of Baby Boomers, Gen X, Xennials, and Millenials
  • ·         3. Participants will be able to discuss how generations and career stages intersect in the workplace (college counseling center)
  • ·         4. Participants will be able to apply the information learned to improve service delivery and harmony in the workplace

Session Title: From the Margins: Resiliency of Women of Color in STEM Programs and Implications for College Counseling

Presenter(s):

Kirstin Sylvester
Mercer University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations

Abstract: Institutions of higher education offer opportunities for professional and personal development. However, higher education can also be accompanied by multiple stressors. The presented study aims to provide a quantitative analysis of the relationship between resilience and experienced microaggressions, and how that relationship influences retention, progression, and degree completion in underrepresented Women of Color in STEM programs. Understanding resilience characteristics allows for the identification of traits and behaviors that can be encouraged. This session is intended to provide implications for career counseling training and practice.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Recognize beneficial traits and behaviors tied to increased resilience among Women of Color in STEM programs.
  • ·         Discuss implications to career counseling training and practice.
  • ·         Develop culturally inclusive practices that support and encourage Women of Color in STEM programs

Session Title: Play is still relevant: Integrating play therapy into a college counseling session

Presenter(s):

Joshua Mangin
Husson University

Rebecca Edelman
University of Wyoming

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: In our society, the act of play can be described as childish. Yet, numerous elements of play exist in a college students life such as video games, party games, and sports. Just spending time with a traditional age college student will expose you to glimmers of playfulness. As counselors, what would happen if we allowed those glimmers to flourish?     In essence, play is a form of communication and meaning making and allows an individual to express and process their current realities in a symbolic manner. Play therapy provides the opportunity to convey and integrate narratives and emotions without necessarily using verbal expression. Various research studies have shown numerous therapeutic benefits including stress reduction, improved social relationships, and increased creativity. Therefore, play therapy can be an additional tool for college counselors, especially with populations who would benefit from a non-verbal form of expression.   For this breakout session, the presenters will review the key concepts of popular play therapy approaches such as Child-Centered, Jungian, Adlerian, and Gestalt. This will be followed by ways to integrate these approaches in a college setting. Finally, participants will have the opportunity to practice this integration in an experiential manner during the breakout session.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will learn the basic theoretical components of various play therapy theories (e.g. Child Centered, Jungian, Adlerian, and Gestalt) and how to integrate the counseling theory within a college counseling framework.
  • ·         Participants will practice and develop skills in implementing play therapy in a college setting through experiential participation and group work during the breakout session.

Session Title: Self-Care is Not Enough: Utilizing ACT to Develop a Philosophy of Self-Care

Presenter(s):

Ashlyn Jones
Cairn University

Ashley VanBemmelen

Topic(s):

  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: This session addresses the need for self-care practices within the framework of values clarification and the development of a philosophy of self-care. Rather than an emphasis on the "how" of self-care this session aims to clearly develop a personal and creative "why" of self-care that would sustain clinicians throughout difficult seasons and to help create enduring self-care practices.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will identify personal values that support and sustain their career in mental health
  • ·         Participants will develop a philosophy of self-care to support their identified values
  • ·         Participants will assess their current understanding of self-care, burnout and vicarious trauma and develop one sustainable self-care practice based on their identified values

Session Title: Self-love and Happiness: Implementing a self-compassion workshop on your campus

Presenter(s):

Toi Geil
University of Wyoming

Eirin Grimes
University of Northern Colorado

Topic(s):

  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Self-compassion offers a holistic way to navigate the inevitable ups and downs of life in higher education.  A self-compassion practice can help both students and staff alike traverse the many challenges present in an ever-changing collegiate environment.  The purpose of this session is to offer counseling center staff ideas for implementing a self-compassion program on their campuses. This session is both didactic and experiential.  Participants will first learn the key aspects of mindful self-compassion as developed by Kristin Neff, Ph.D.  Participants will also be exposed to the current research related to self-compassion and college students.  The presenters will discuss their experience with implementing mindfulness-based self-compassion workshops on their campus and lead the group through some of the activities offered in their workshop.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will be able to describe the tenets of self-compassion as a psychological construct and practice.
  • ·         Participants will be able to describe the current research related to self-compassion, especially its use in collegiate settings.
  • ·         Participants will be able to apply the tools and techniques of self-compassion informed practice, including how to implement these groups on campus.

Session Title: Treating Eating Disorders and Underlying Perfectionism in High Achievers

Presenter(s):

Andrea Barbian
Liberty University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations

Abstract: Often in the treatment of eating disorders, an underlying aspect of perfectionism is seen. For individuals suffering with an eating disorder, this element of perfectionism is also often seen in academic settings.  While there are benefits of being a high achiever, perfectionism in eating disorders can be detrimental. As clinicians we are challenged with not only assessing and treating the eating disorder and its comorbities, but also with assessing whether the underlying perfectionism is a maladaptive or adaptive component. Specifically in academic settings, the goal becomes harnessing the individual's desire for high achievement, while quieting their critical and perfectionistic inner voice. The primary goals of this session will be to build upon this understanding and develop more specific tools and treatment strategies focused on the multidimensional constructs that come to play when addressing perfectionism and disordered eating.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         1.Establish a basic knowledge of eating disorders (symptoms, diagnostic criteria, and etiology) and their comorbidities
  • ·         2. Establish a basic understanding of perfectionism and its ability to be maladaptive or adaptive
  • ·         3. Explore treatment modalities and specific interventions aimed at addressing perfectionism and disordered eating
  • ·         4. Apply presented principles of evidence based treatment and interventions to case vingettes



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