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Summer Symposium Breakout Sessions

The following sessions will be presented at the 2017 ACCA Summer Symposium.


Health Behavior Change and Emerging Adult Development: Considerations for University Counseling Practice

Presenters:
Justin Jacques - The George Washington University

Educational Topic: Other 

Abstract:
Increasingly emerging adult clients entering university counseling centers may be facing the need to make significant health behavior changes.  Sometimes these health behavioral changes may be necessary to save the lives of clients.  A salient example is the overweight and obese adult epidemic in the US. Per the CDC the percentage of adults 20 years and over that are overweight is 70.7 percent (2014).   A foundational issue related to these chronic a pervasive health behavioral issues is that change at this stage of development begins to become difficult. However, specific strategies and interventions have been identified in the literature that may be especially helpful (Baum et al., 2012). An example strategy would be the utilization of social media, which has been found to  have considerable potential as a tool for health promotion and education (Korda & Itani, 2013).  When an intervention that promotes positive health behavior change include a solid understanding of the individuals, the social milieu, and environmental contexts, and their influences on their health behaviors, the chances are good that they will be effective (Glanz & Rimer, 2008). The presenter will foster a collaborative conversation with attendees to further the knowledge of health behaviors and health behavioral change.
 
Learning Objectives:

  • Utilize an overview of current conceptual and empirical literature that addresses health behavior and health behavior change as it relates to emerging adult development.
  • Formulate a conceptual framework for clinicians that fosters critical thinking in regard to working with university students who present with the need for health behavioral change, while infusing an emerging adult development perspective.
  • Foster collaborative new ideas, tools, and creative practices as it relates to health behaviors and health behavior change in clinical counseling practice.
  • Critique current unhelpful myths and practices as it relates to health behaviors and health behavior change.

Changing Campus Culture One Stache & Heart at a Time

Presenters:
Ginny Williams - The University of Findlay 
Rachel Walter - The University of Findlay

Educational Topic: Outreach and Prevention

Abstract:
Oilers Changing Campus Culture (OC3) is a resource at The University of Findlay that strives to shine a light on sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking (SADVDVS). OC3 is a partnership between various campus and community allies focused on SADVDVS prevention. This session will highlight this successful model of a campus and community partnership that has been established to improve overall campus culture, planning and implementation of  prevention and outreach programming.     We will discuss how mustaches and hearts became the focal points of two separate month long prevention campaigns at The University of Findlay. Fall programming that capitalized on the National Movember Campaign addressing men's physical and behavioral health issues will be shared. The presentation will focus on how programming sought to provide male students the opportunity to examine their masculinity in the context of the campus community and develop counter narratives to dominant masculinity. Spring programming centered on the theme of, "Love Yourself Enough" addressed the topics of help seeking behaviors, suicide prevention, stigma reduction and personal empowerment.   Participants will learn how to design similar campaigns and how these comprehensive, large scale initiatives can be implemented with limited resources and make significant impact within any learning community.
 
Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to create effective coalitions through collaborative campus and community partnerships like OC3 (Oilers Changing Campus Culture) to foster and advance work around creating a campus of caring individuals.
  • Participants will be able to plan and implement programs informed on college men and masculinity through the illustration of The University of Findlay's Movember initiatives and programs.
  • Participants will be able to plan and implement programs informed on suicide prevention, help seeking behaviors and self worth through the illustration of The University of Findlay's "Love Yourself Enough" initiatives and programs.

We Are Going to Th Dogs: Animal Assisted Therapy in the College Counseling Center

Presenters:
Pamela Flint - University of North Texas

Educational Topic: Outreach and Prevention

Abstract:
The use of animals to augment therapy has been increasingly popular over the past decade.  Dogs have been the most common animal utilized in this type of therapy.  Diverse populations including the elderly, veterans, and college students benefit from AAT.  These benefits include both physical and psychological components.  This program illustrates the benefits as well as the challenges of AAT in the college counseling center.  Drawing from the general practice of AAT and the program development and implementation of AAT at one college counseling center, this program overviews the current research findings and practical knowledge that informs the application of AAT in a college counseling setting.
 
Learning Objectives:

  • Summarize the research findings regarding the efficacy of animal assisted therapy.
  • List desired qualities of a canine enlisted to do animal assisted therapy at a college counseling center
  • Recognize the benefits that AAT can bring to a college counseling center
  • Identify some of the challenges associated with AAT in a college counseling center
  • Consider possible administrative hurdles associated with bringing AAT to your college counseling center.

Mentally Ill or Just Out of Sync? The Asynchronous Development Model for Assessment and Treatment

Presenters:
Tom Bissonette - The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

 Educational Topic: Counseling Techniques

 Abstract:
Ample research has established that older adolescents and young adults generally have the cognitive ability to engage in hypothetical thinking, critical thinking, and rational decision making. Recent research also debunks the myth that wisdom is the domain of those of us that have put in the most time. These studies assert that the window for the acquisition of wisdom for many people may close by the end of early adulthood. By helping youth understand their developmental issues we can offer a new approach to prevention and student decision-making that honors the abilities of youth to solve problems once they understand them.  This session will teach the college professional to help students not only understand their own developmental issues, but also the pressures they experience from asynchronous development. The DSRM (Developmental Stress Reduction Method) will be introduced, a technique that increases self-awareness and encourages decision-making that capitalizes on the intelligence of youth and demystifies their sometimes inconsistent and self-defeating behavior.
 
Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to administer and interpret the Asynchronous Development Assessment Survey.
  • Participants will be able to apply the three treatment components of the D.R.S.M model.
  • Using the DSRM technique, participants will practice an intervention that is designed to create a transformative experience for the client.
  • Participants will be able to identify opportunities to apply the model to specific types of student problems or mental health issues.
  • Participants will learn how to use the Asynchronous Development Model as a prevention tool.

From chaos to harmony: The process of cross-cultural communication

Presenters:
Rachita Sharma - University of North Texas 

Educational Topic: Diversity/Inclusivity
 
Abstract:
In this interactive presentation, attendees will be engaged in the dynamic game of Barnga. Designed to be a game about inter-cultural awareness, Barnga provides participants with an opportunity to make discoveries about the subtle nuances of inter-cultural differences in perception, metacognition, and communication.
 
Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will analyze the Silent Language of culture and other key terms pertinent to this concept.
  • Participants will develop skills that allow them to engage in effective reconciliation of intergroup differences in order to facilitate maximum functionality in a cross-cultural group
  • Participants will engage in a discussion about the different levels of cultural awareness and ways in which counselors can utilize this information to provide culturally sensitive services to clients.

Campus Globalization: Supporting International & Study Abroad Student Transitions

Presenters:
Ian Lertora - Texas Tech University
Alexis Croffie - Texas Tech University 

Educational Topic: Diversity/Inclusivity
 
Abstract:
The international student populations on our university campuses in the US have steadily been on the rise for the last decade (IIE, 2016). The current research indicates that international student populations have not been receiving support that enables them to maintain the optimistic mentality necessary to successfully transition into our universities and surrounding communities during their time as a student, which may impact their chances for successful transition into their careers after they complete their studies. As counselors on college and university campuses we are in a unique position to assist with promoting diversity, multicultural awareness, and fostering a truly global atmosphere on our campuses that is beneficial to support the mental health needs of our international students and domestic students alike. This presentation will provide an amalgam of past, current, and new research, as well as some shared experiences of student service professionals' who have significantly interacted with international student populations will be presented. Implications and suggestions for how college counselors can be of support for our international student populations without significantly increasing their workloads will be discussed in an open forum.
 
Learning Objectives:

  • The attendees will learn about the pivotal role that college counselors can play in fostering a global environment on college campuses
  • The attendees will learn ways to support the transitional experiences of international and study abroad students that will not significantly increase their workload
  • The attendees have opportunities to participate in discussions of how we can all support one another in providing the support our students need to successfully navigate the numerous transitions they experience.
  • The attendees will take away strategies and techniques to assist them in providing support for international and study abroad students

Destigmatizing Mental Health in Athletes

Presenters:
Jay E. Darr - University of North Texas
Kristina J. Clevinger - UNT Center for Sport Psychology and Performance Excellence
Jenna L. Tomalski - UNT Center for Sport Psychology and Performance Excellence
Trent A. Petrie - UNT Center for Sport Psychology and Performance Excellence

Educational Topic: Other (please explain in "comments" box below)

Abstract:
Recent data indicates that 20-50% of male and female collegiate student-athletes have experienced depression and/or anxiety during the last 12 months (Brown, Hainline, Kroshus, & Wilfert, 2014). Thus, early identification is key and pre-participation mental health screening can be a vital part of this process. Further, student-athletes experience reservations about seeking mental health services, such as fearing their teammates will find out they are in treatment and perceive them as weak (Leimer, Leon, & Shelley, 2014) or fearing coaches will restrict playing time in competitions. Thus, active efforts by athletic departments to help reduce the stigma should be made, such as by systematically and directly providing student-athletes with education about mental health disorders and ways to seek support (Lopez & Levy, 2013).  This workshop will introduce an approach to destigmatizing mental health, facilitating early identification, normalizing care seeking among student-athletes, and liaising with a university athletic department.
 
Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the role of pre-participation mental health screening in evaluating student athletes' overall health and well-being.
  • Understand how to evaluate pre-participation mental health screening results and conduct follow-up interviews
  • Become familiar with introducing (and destigmatizing) mental health issues with student athletes.
  • Identify key mental health services that are needed within a university athletic department.
  • Learn how to coordinate mental health services between a university's counseling center and athletic department.

Building Resilience & Self-Worth Through Group

Presenters:
Bethany Smith - Texas A&M University Student Counseling Service
Megan Culpepper - Texas A&M University Student Counseling Service
Kristie De La Garza - Texas A&M University Student Counseling Service

Educational Topic: Counseling Techniques

Abstract:
 
Why self-worth? How does shame and vulnerability hinder the process of creating resiliency and obtaining a sense of worthiness? "Who am I?" College students often struggle to cultivate a strong sense of identity, and this process can impact their connection in relationships and their sense of self-worth. This session will provide a rationale for using group as an effective treatment modality to help students increase their resiliency and embrace their self-worth. The intent of the self-worth group is to provide an atmosphere that allows students to expose and explore their fears and vulnerabilities and how these affect their sense of self. We will describe high impact interventions to help explore vulnerability, shame, self-esteem, self-compassion, and other relevant topics as well as outline an 8-week semi-structured group format.
 
Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will assess how to facilitate the group modality in an effective way to assist clients in embracing difficult themes such as shame and vulnerability in order to increase resilience and self-worth.
  • Attendees will engage in experiential activities and interventions that they can utilize in their therapeutic work to challenge clients to examine their own barriers of feeling worthy.
  • Attendees will explore how to implement the "Embracing Your Self-Worth" group in a university counseling center.

  Eating Disorder Treatment Teams: A Multidisciplinary Approach on a College Campus

Presenters:
Steffanie Grossman - University of North Texas
Herschel Voorhees - University of North Texas
Danielle Gemoets - University of North Texas

Educational Topic: Other (please explain in "comments" box below) 

Abstract:
College students are a population particularly at risk for eating disorders and eating disorder symptoms.  As eating disorders can have lethal consequences, with anorexia nervosa having the highest mortality rate of all mental health disorders, it is pivotal that universities are equipped to identify and effectively treat or refer students with eating disorders.  As students may not wish to comply with professional recommendations, it is also necessary to have administration involved who can assist in the process of ensuring this student's safety as well as the well-being of their peers who may be impacted.  This presentation will describe the development and current organization of University of North Texas' Body Image and Eating Awareness Team, which consists of a therapist, psychiatrist, medical provider, registered dietician, fitness professional, student advocate from Dean of Students, and team coordinator.  Additional outreach and prevention efforts will also be discussed.  Benefits and challenges of the intervention and prevention activities, as well as student, parent, administrative, and community feedback, will be presented, in an effort to positively impact your own university's current treatment of students with eating disorders.
 
Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe to their departments and campuses a multidisciplinary approach for eating disorder treatment and prevention.
  • Participants will be able to use information presented to inform eating disorder treatment on their campuses.
  • Participants will be able to describe challenges related to campus multidisciplinary eating disorder treatment teams.

TAO: An Approach to Increase Access and Service Capacity?

Presenters:
Jay E. Darr - University of North Texas
Pamela Flint, Ph.D. - University of North Texas

Educational Topic: Counseling Techniques
 
Abstract:
Counseling Center staff and financial resources have yet to achieve parity with increased utilization that many institutions are experiencing. National data indicates a 50% increase in service utilization while clinician to student ratios fall short of meeting the International Association of Counseling Services (IACS) recommendation of one F.T.E. (excluding trainees) to every 1,000-1,500 students (ACHA, 2016; IACS, 2017). Consequently, barriers to services for mental health and substance use related problems have resulted in lower grades, incompletes, withdrawal or significant disruption (ACHA, 2016). This interactive workshop will introduce an approach to increase access, service capacity, and discuss lessons learned from implementation and ongoing management of the Therapist Assisted On-Line (TAO) platform at the University of North Texas.
 
Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the intersection among telemental health, students, and counseling centers.
  • Describe TAO benefits, features, and fit.
  • Identify key considerations for implementing and managing TAO within the institution and counseling center framework.

The Mindful, Multicultural Clinician: A Courageous Conversation

Presenters:
Arlene Rivero Carr - University of North Texas
Enedelia Sauceda - University of North Texas 

Educational Topic: Diversity/Inclusivity
 
Abstract:
In this session, we will invite participants to have a "courageous conversation" about current sociopolitical events, personal reactions and the impact on clinical work. National events as flooded our screens with images of trauma, conflict, violence and violation of human rights.  This impacts the populations we see and the clinicians who serve them (Chen & Gorski, 2015).  The damage that is caused by marginalization, oppression and microaggression is real for our clients and because we are multicultural beings, it's real for clinicians, too.  Even the most skilled and advanced multiculturally competent clinician is having to  re-evaluate and reflect because of the flooding events in the last 2 years. This conversation will serve as a place for participants to re-evaluate and reflect.  The conversation will highlight the impact of the sociopolitical climate on the personal and professional identity, the populations we serve, and mental health. Leaning on the core pillars of Multicultural Competencies, (awareness, knowledge and skills), We hope to: 1) increase self-awareness/mindfulness 2) share knowledge about how to label and talk about our experiences and 3) utilize mindfulness skills so that clinicians can practice empathy with clients and personal self care.
 
Learning Objectives:

  • Describe your own thoughts and feelings about current, national social justice issues.
  • Identify ways you can use mindfulness to empathize with clients and engage in self care.
  • Articulate and plan ways to use what you have learned with your own staff and trainees.

Sexual Assault and Advocacy in College Counseling Centers

Presenters:
J. Carol Mercer - University of North Texas
Joseph Allberg - University of North Texas
Renee McNamara - University of North Texas

Educational Topic: Outreach and Prevention

Abstract:
 
College and University campuses have received national attention regarding providing helpful resources for Survivors of sexual assault (Conley & Griffith, 2016; Eisenberg, Lust, Hannan, & Porta, 2016; White Kress, Trippany, & Nolan, 2003). As higher education institutions seek to provide effective services for Survivors some initiatives have include team approaches including medical staff, campus or city law enforcement, student affairs personnel and mental health clinicians (Ma, A. 2017). Some college and university counseling centers have joined this supportive mission by offering interventions including individual, group, workshops and outreach programming (Artime, T. M., & Buchholz, K. R., 2016). This interactive session highlights one university counseling center's efforts to meet survivors in their healing journey. Presenters will include the university's Survivor Advocate and College Counselors who facilitate Survivors of Sexual Assault (SOSA) groups on campus. Counselors and Survivor Advocate will share their roles and collaboration efforts. Counselors will also share their current SOSA group components based on models  from CPT, CBT, and Trauma Focused Therapies, provide information regarding collaboration with campus' Advocate, and facilitate audience counselor's sharing of ideas and experiences in an effort to promote more effective support for Survivors on our campuses.
 
Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will gain knowledge regarding sexual assault response on university and college campuses
  • Attendees will gain knowledge of college and university counseling center responses to campus sexual assault.
  • Attendees will learn about the role of a Survivor Advocate (SA) on campus and ways the SA collaborates with college counseling centers to support survivors.
  • Attendees will also learn components of a Survivors of Sexual Assault Support group based on concepts from CPT, CBT, and trauma focused therapy.
  • Attendees will be provided with an article outlining a five phase model (Bagley & Diambra, 2016) for working with sexual assault survivors.

Surviving & Thriving in the "Sandwich Generation": Understanding the dynamics of aging, and its impact on family relationships & work-life balance.

Presenters:
Shannon Ingram - Northern Virginia Community College
Jayna Cobbs - Northern Virginia Community College

Educational Topic: Other (please explain in "comments" box below)

Abstract:
The Sandwich generation is defined as those (usually in their 30's or 40's) who care for their aging parents while supporting their own children. Adult children of the elderly, who are "sandwiched" between their aging parents and their own maturing children, are subjected to a great deal of stress (Roots, 2014). What is your "sandwich"? Recent research also suggest that many experience the "family squeeze", with family applying pressure from several different directions (Do, Cohen & Brown,2014). What are the things that cause you to feel the squeeze? In this session, participants will define the "sandwich generation", the dynamics of aging and the impact is has on family relationships and work-life balance. Participants will also identify strategies counselors and their clients can achieve a better work-life balance and tips on how to go from stress to success while care-giving. Through the use of video, case scenarios, and small group exercises participants will leave the session not only with an enhanced understanding of the  "sandwich" generation and the dynamics of aging, but with strategies to improve their work life balance and family relationships.
 
Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will define the "sandwich generation", the dynamics of aging and the impact is has on family relationships and work-life balance.
  • Participants will describe challenges to maintaining healthy work-life balance and list strategies for improvement.
  • Participants will explain the dynamics of aging and identify strategies that can applied to their counseling profession and daily lives.

 

Reaching Students in the Digital Age: Innovative and Collaborative Efforts Across Campus

Presenters:

Meladee Garst - Wichita State University
Erin Lohman - Wichita State University

Educational Topic: Outreach and Prevention

Abstract:
Engaging college students on the topic of mental health can be difficult. However, use of social media platforms has been found to promote health awareness and offers an opportunity to encourage mental wellness on your campus (Korda & Itani, 2013). Nearly 90% of young adults use social media (Perrin, 2015), most on a daily basis (Greenwood, Perrin, & Duggan, 2016). Incorporating the use of social media and other digital platforms within your center can foster opportunities to better connect with your students. During this panel, the presenters will discuss various strategies for engaging students through social media and online platforms. Challenges and successes with social media and digital outreach will be reviewed. The presenters will highlight the importance of co-programming with other departments across campus in order to reach a larger target audience, create meaningful messaging, and diversify content.
 
Learning Objectives:

  • By the end of this presentation, the participants will be able to:  
    • Describe four ways to engage students on social media 
    • Conversation and cross promoting through other groups 
    • Messaging/ hashtags 
    • Giveaways 
    • Videos
  • By the end of this presentation, the participants will be able to:  
    • Design three ways to connect students to social media/digital platforms 
    • Use of orientation 
    • Use of low-tech tables 
    • Use of videos 
    • Use of multiple social media and online platforms



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