Founded in 1991 | A division of the American Counseling Association


2023 ACCA Conference Breakout Sessions

All times listed are EST

Friday, March 3, 2023
10:30AM - 12:00PM

Counselors Caring for Counselors: Pivoting From a Focus on Professional Development to Wellness and Resilience During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Presenter(s):

Jennifer Chiaramonti
Community College of Philadelphia

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: This session will cover the history, purpose, and programs offered by the Professional Development Committee of a counseling department at a large, multi-campus, urban community college.  Emphasis will be given to how the Committee pivoted to address counselor self-care, morale, team-building, and resiliency during the pandemic campus shut-down and the shift to remote work.  The programs offered by the Committee helped to keep counselors connected from behind computer screens and boost employee wellness.  Once back on campus and working in person again, the Committee resumed its former focus on Professional Development, but members also voted to continue with a thread of wellness programming for the counselors of the department.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will become familiar with one dozen wellness programming ideas that can be easily implemented upon return to their own campus counseling departments
  • Attendees will understand the importance of, and rationale for, having an intradepartmental or institutional committee focused on counselor professional development and wellbeing
  • Attendees will appreciate why counselor well-being is about more than just individual self-care, but also requires organizational or institutional support

Ecological Factors of Depression and Anxiety Among International College Students in the U.S.A.

Presenter(s):

Yuhsun Peng
Syracuse University

Topic(s):   

  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: This presentation aims to explore the factors contribute to depression and anxiety among international students studying in the U.S., as well as highlight several discussions on the unique challenges international students studying in the U.S. encounter in their transition to a different setting such as culture, school, and living environment. Furthermore, the presentation shed light on the competency of the counseling profession in recognizing the psychological needs of international students. The factors discussed in this literature review are highlighted and exposed to assist educators and counselors in higher education in increasing awareness of mental health issues and help-seeking behaviors of this population. It is also intended to reach the counselors who work with this population to improve the competency of multicultural perspectives and have a holistic picture of ecological issues around the population of international students. At last, the presenter suggested some outreach programs and interventions that could potentially assist this population to meet this population's needs in culturally responsive ways.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to list at least three factors that influence college international students' mental wellness.
  • Participants will be able to design at least one intervention to promote college international students' mental wellness.
  • Participants will be able to assess college international students' psychological needs in a culturally responsive manner.

The Toxic Demands of Positivity and Resilience

Presenter(s):

Holly Vanderhoff
SUNY Upstate Medical University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice  

Abstract: The seemingly ever-increasing cultural imperative to live one's "#bestlife" and reappraise difficult or even traumatic experiences in a positive, "resilience-building" manner can have unintended harmful consequences. These may include paradoxical reductions in positive affect and social connectedness, as well as increases in anxiety or feelings of shame. This breakout session will examine the ways in which trendy demands to think positively and "lean in" to adversity may influence students' expectations for themselves and negatively impact their wellbeing. We will also examine the ways in which clinical approaches rooted in positive psychology and cognitive-behavioral therapy may become distorted by, or mistaken for, these potentially dangerous tropes. We will also explore the particularly corrosive impact of insistence on building a "resilience mindset" for students who experience deleterious impacts from identity-based systemic oppression or other ongoing aversive circumstances.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the potential negative outcomes associated with over-emphasis on positive thinking and resilience as the keys to building positive emotions or overcoming mental health challenges
  • Describe the ways in which cultural "toxic positivity" may influence the counseling/therapy process with students and how to remain vigilant to this possibility as a counselor or therapist

Silent, but Deadly Depression in Black males, on a College Campus

Presenter(s):

Elnora Vicks
Nicholls State University

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: This will be an interactive presentation that will explore the factors and effects of depression in black males on a college campus. Can you recognize the symptoms of depression in  your black male students? How are you helping to eliminate the stigma on the mental health issues affecting black males on your campus, specifically a PWI campus? What practices are you implementing in your campus, in your community or within your personal lives? This presentation will have participants re-examine how they implement therapeutic practices for black male college students on a college campus and within the counseling setting. Finally, They will learn to recognize the contributing factors that lead to depression in black male college students.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identifying the factors which contribute to depression in black males college students from childhood to adulthood.
  • Examining how we can Implement therapeutic practices in the counseling setting  on a college campus.
  • Explore how we can be more proactive in eliminating the stigma and creating safe spaces  on our college campus, within the community and, in our own personal lives.

Examining Rape Myth Acceptance Among LGBTQIA+ College Students

Presenter(s):

Adrienne Graham
The University of Georgia

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention
  • Community College Focus

Abstract: Many publications have been dedicated to studying sexual assault prevention specifically on college campuses. The proposed qualitative study is to investigate rape myth acceptance (RMA) within LGBTQIA+ communities. Participants would include those that identify as members of the LBGTQIA+ community. A qualitative study is proposed to answer the question, "what rape myths exist among LGBTQIA+ college students" utilizing an Interpretative Phenomenological Approach to improve sexual assault prevention, programming, and services for LGBTQIA+ survivors on college campuses. Rape myths among the college student population and specifically within LGBTQIA+ individuals has not been examined. Therefore, this proposed study aims to address this gap.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will discuss dynamics around sexual violence on college campuses that specifically affect LGBTQIA+ survivors and how to improve counseling LGBTQIA+ identifying survivors.
  • Participants will gain an in depth understanding of the limited data, resources, and inclusive services for LGBTQIA+ survivors and steps towards improving clinical aftercare and counselor response in university settings.
  • Participants will gain insight into the gaps highlighted with LGBTQIA+ invisibility within sexual assault prevention research and the need for the proposed study.

UAB Athletic Mental Health Team: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Providing Effective Mental Health Programs and Services for Student-Athletes

Presenter(s):

Kelli lasseter
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: The landscape of college athletics has changed sharply over the past decade. Student-athlete mental health has seen a marked increase in severity in recent years due in part to pressures associated with NIL and increasing demands to perform both athletically and academically. Suicide rates among student-athletes are at an all-time high and while progress has been made to address athlete-specific mental health issues, there are still pervasive barriers to care. The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) decided to take a proactive stance in addressing these issues by creating the Athletic Mental Health Team (AMHT).   UAB's AMHT is a multidisciplinary group comprised of Athletic Administrators, Clinical Counselors, Physicians, and Athletic Trainers assigned with developing policies and procedures that improve access to care. Communication between departments is conducted via the Student Counseling Services Liaison to Athletics. The Liaison is tasked with developing working relationships within athletics; delivering programs and services for staff and students; and serves as the Co-chair of the AMHT. The role of Liaison to athletics has proven to be a critical piece in creating and maintaining efficacious partnerships between departments.    This session will offer resources for developing an AMHT using NCAA best practices and resources.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will acquire statistical data supporting the need for improved access to student-athlete mental health care.
  • Attendees will utilize NCAA resources for identifying the need for an AMHT at their member institution
  • Attendees will assess their campus readiness for an AMHT.
  • Attendees will assess need for a Liaison role to serve as an interdepartmental contact for mental health programs and services.

Training and Supervision Considerations in Rural College and University Settings

Presenter(s):

Mark Taracuk
Georgia Southern University

Topic(s):

  • Clinical Supervision and Training

Abstract: Mental health services in rural areas can experience barriers to accessibility, availability, and acceptability. As such, clinical training in college and university counseling settings in rural areas can face unique challenges such as such as lack of adequate mental health resources, difficulty in supporting the mental health needs of a variety of presenting concerns, and experiencing potential differences in client and clinician socio-cultural backgrounds. This presentation seeks to conceptualize the rural practice issues that clinical trainees across all levels of training, including practicum, externship, and internship, might face by discussing particular cultural aspects of rural contexts as well as discuss potential solutions. Particular focus will be on steps that training programs and supervisors can utilize and implement to increase trainee and supervisee competency with regards to clinical skills and cultural diversity.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe at least 2 ethical issues related to training and supervision in rural college counseling settings.
  • Participants will be able to describe at least 3 training- and supervision-related issues related to rural college counseling settings.
  • Participants will be able to identify 3 benefits to clinical training in rural college counseling settings.
  • Participants will be able to describe 3 strategies to support clinical trainees in rural college counseling settings.

Can I make it through this? The heart of taking care of ourselves in a workplace

Presenter(s):

David Walden

Topic(s):

  • Administrative

Abstract: Working in mental health in higher education has never had a higher profile or a more difficult set of challenges. If the people leaving our work are any indication, and the surveys of our colleagues are correct, we are experiencing higher levels of burnout and turnover than ever before. In this space, it makes a lot of sense to have questions like “Can I keep doing this? How do I take care of myself and stay grounded? How can I make this work sustainable?”

This workshop will focus on several factors and processes that can make a workplace more sustainable. We will explore and learn about the values that ground us and provide meaning, the boundaries that help us stay healthy, and reimagining “self-care” as self love. We will work with didactic material, self reflection, dyads, and group discussion. Mostly we will work together to create a restorative and rejuvenating space that can inform how to integrate and align what’s inside of us with the work that we do.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify at least 2 of the primary values that make their work life meaningful
  • Discern and apply at least 2 boundaries that make work more sustainable
  • Describe the difference between traditional definitions of self-care and care as loving the self

Friday, March 3, 2023
1:30PM - 3:00PM

Decisions, Decisions: Assisting Students to Navigate Disclosure in Higher Education

Presenter(s):

Brittany Stone
Rutgers, School of Health Professions

Amy Banko
Rutgers, School of Health Professions

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice       

Abstract: Students with mental health conditions (MHCs) are the fastest-growing disability group on campus. As more students seek campus-based mental health services and accommodations for MHCs, we must provide them with the information and skills necessary to navigate conversations around disability successfully.  The decision to disclose a non-apparent disability is personal. Disclosure can be complex when it comes to a MHC, as many factors are considered including confidentiality, fear of stigma/discrimination, and perceived open-mindedness of instructors or fellow students. For some, this is the first time they have had to navigate disability-related services independently, while other students are new to this process.   Disclosure decisions are not a one-off event but one that is repeated in every new academic situation. Furthermore, unanticipated inquiries by professors or classmates about disability status, nature of disability, or abilities can leave a student disclosing more information than they intended. Such over-disclosure can result in feelings of regret, shame, and embarrassment, hindering attendance, engagement, or academic performance.   This session will provide skills & strategies to assist students in navigating these disclosure experiences. We will discuss ways to engage students in the disclosure decision-making process & will include a structured approach to identifying disclosure preferences in higher education.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learners will identify special considerations & complexities for students related to disclosing a mental health condition in the academic environment.
  • Learners will develop the ability to assist students with mental health conditions in creating an intentional disclosure plan for classmates, staff, and faculty (by using the Disclosure Decisions: Disclosing Your Mental Health Condition in Higher Educatio

The Crisis Continues: Reevaluating Strategies to Promote Wellness Among Students in Higher Education Counseling Centers

Presenter(s):

Ashley Osborne
Truckee Meadows Community College

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: Rising from the ashes of the COVID-19 pandemic, college counselors must abandon the expectation of returning to "the way things were". Increasingly, students are dropping into college and university counseling centers in crisis. Counselors must balance academic and career concerns with housing and food insecurity, intimate partner violence, addictions, social isolation and more. Partnered with residual student reliance on and preference for telehealth services, the landscape of counseling in higher education is ever changing.  Traditional processes and modalities may no longer be sufficient for already over-burdened counselors working in higher education. How we choose to respond to this crisis will have a long-lasting impact on our students and institutions as a whole. This presentation will address strategies for integration and implementation of mixed-modality counseling, identify prominent concerns impacting student wellness, and engage attendees in discussions around what works, and where to go moving forward.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify strategies for implementing mixed-modality counseling approaches
  • Distinguish themes in post-pandemic student needs
  • Propose innovative approaches for serving students in higher education settings

Embarking on a New Voyage: Revising and Renewing the Mental Health Narrative toward Sustainable Counseling Center Services

Presenter(s):

Gary Glass

Topic(s):

  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: Trends and conventional practices of the past few decades in college counseling are proving to be unsustainable.  With a review of national data trends, this program will briefly summarize the dominant mental-health narrative in Higher Education and the general media, informed by the context of the past few "pandemic years."  From this, the program will focus on re-narrating our challenges and renewing our confidence and creativity to address those challenges in a more sustainable manner.  The bulk of the program will articulate a nuanced alternative narrative, along with strategies and tools to shift direction toward a systemic approach to revise how we frame and address the demands facing college counseling centers.  In particular, materials and summaries of initiatives that incorporate academic affairs and faculty, student leadership development efforts, new student orientation programs, enrollment services, and other communities of influence will be explored.  Participants will be encouraged to envision embarking on a new voyage, with implications on counseling staff morale, managing expectations of campus administrators, and shifting mentalities of students away from assumptions and practices conducive to mental distress and impairment.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will articulate specific elements of the current narrative of college mental health that warrant revision and re-narrating and why a re-vision is necessary at this point in the evolution of Higher Education.
  • Participants will identify at least 2 activities they can represent efforts on their campuses toward a more systemic and sustainable college mental health narrative
  • Participants can identify at least 2 partners to collaborate or support the counseling center in contributing to a systemic approach to campus mental health.

Caring for the collegiate crisis counselor: Best-practices for college crisis counseling self-care and prevention of burnout and secondary traumatic stress

Presenter(s):

Lindsay Lundeen
University of Georgia

Topic(s):

  • Clinical Supervision and Training
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Counselor training programs inundate counselors-in-training in crisis counseling skills, advanced terminology, and many acronyms to aid suicide prevention and crisis management with clients. However, little training prepares students and counselors for the after-effects of suicide prevention sessions and moments of crisis. This presentation will discuss topics of secondary traumatic stress and burnout as they apply to college counselor mental health.   Emphasis will be placed on counselor self-care, with provided empirically supported techniques to minimize the potential for secondary traumatic stress and burnout, as well as decrease anxiety or worries about the client in crisis after completing the session or a necessary hospitalization.   Additionally, this presentation will provide empirically supported counseling supervision models for introspective assessment of crisis counseling strengths and growing edges, geared toward counselors-in-training, seasoned counselors, and supervisors, as well as counselor educators teaching courses on crisis intervention.   The presentation will conclude with opportunities to practice newly learned techniques, an exercise creating a pre and post-session crisis self-care plan, and an opportunity to discuss how college counselors in the session maintain personal self-care practices after a crisis session.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will be able to describe current statistics on burnout and secondary traumatic stress among crisis counselors.
  • Attendees will be able to list empirically supported techniques to minimize secondary traumatic stress and burnout among crisis counselors.
  • Attendees will be able to describe empirically supported supervision models while also applying the models to assess their personal crisis counseling skills to determine areas of strength and areas needing growth.
  • Attendees will create a pre-session and post-session self-care checklist, which they will be equipped to implement before and after crisis counseling sessions or client hospitalizations.
  • Attendees will be able to effectively apply newly learned self-care techniques, create a pre and post-session crisis self-care plan, and will be able to describe the self-care strategies of other counselors and counselor educators when disseminating the s

Promoting Success Among College Students on the Autism Spectrum

Presenter(s):

Allison McDonald
West Chester University

Kathryn Alessandria
West Chester University

Topic(s):

  • Diversity/Inclusion/Equity

Abstract: The number of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)  is growing exponentially in colleges and universities. Many colleges and universities do not have specific programs to support students with ASD. College counselors need training in how to support the growing number of college students with ASD who experience challenges such as social, emotional, academics, communication, self-advocacy and struggles with academic adjusting to independent living. Research indicates individuals who have been diagnosed with ASD in the United States have increased at such a rapid rate and is now about 1 in every 59 children. Case studies support that students with ASD are college able, but they do struggle in various areas and do need assistance to be more successful. The purpose of this session is to share knowledge gained from successful ASD support programs on campuses across the United States and use research to support the need for college counselors to help college students with ASD have more successful outcomes. Audience members will be invited to exchange ideas to best support students with ASD along with ways to appropriately incorporate more all-inclusive events on campuses.

Learning Objectives:

  • Present research on the effectiveness of ASD support programs on college campuses.
  • Identify practical strategies to implement ASD support programs on college campuses.
  • Discuss case studies of West Chester University students with ASD in the D-CAP program along with case studies from two other colleges.

What is Stereotype Threat? Understanding how negative images hurt academic performance of Racially Marginalized Students

Presenter(s):

Onoriode Evwaraye
Counseling & Psychological Services, Emory University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: Society is saturated with stereotypes about people of color. This is especially true when it comes to stereotypes regarding academic and intellectual ability. In fact, these stereotypes have very serious real world implications for Black and Latino students. Awareness of these negative images can lead to a psychological phenomenon that can influence these student's overall performance. Research has shown that this phenomenon often lead to harmful outcomes on standardized test like the GRE, grades on classroom exams, IQ scores, and other academic related measures. Long term, the negative impact often leads to lower admission to graduate school, avoidance of challenging majors and career paths, decreased studying, and decreased chances of completion of college. In this workshop, we will examine the phenomena known as Stereotype Threat – What is it, how does it work, and what can we do about it?

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to demonstrate the ability to identify "triggers" and impact of Stereotype Threat
  • Participants will be able to develop and implement interventions design to ameliorate the impact of stereotype threat on marginalized students.

The Harm in Healing

Presenter(s):

Aimee Bellmore
Savannah College of Art and Design

Kalima Harris
Savannah College of Art and Design

Abstract: This program will focus on the evolution of mental health practices and how the lack of diversity has often caused harm in spite of our primary goal to heal. It will also review the process in which our counseling center addressed this issue by utilizing our knowledge of intersectionality to repair relationships within our marginalized student population. As clinicians, our primary focus is to help facilitate the healing process through the vehicle of counseling. Our code of ethics and moral compass is based on the commitment that we will “do no harm”. However, with just a brief historical review of our professions practice quite the contrary will be confirmed. As a result of the lack of diversity, some foundational psychological practices were derivative of racial, sexist, and homophobic concepts. Barring good intentions and motivation to heal, the mental health field has been largely responsible for the malignant societal perceptions that we encounter today. This, in essence, becomes the basis for the barriers experienced within college counseling centers. Our counseling center would like to share how we have worked to utilize common barriers as bridges to help repair relationships and build a stronger union with our students.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to discuss the benefits and challenges of common mental health practices.
  • Participants will be able to critically analyze their own inclusive practices, personal beliefs and attitudes about historically marginalized people and cultures.
  • Participants will be able to define and describe various issues related to diversity, equity and inclusion through the lens of intersectionality.
  • Participants will be able to analyze their institution’s structure to set measurable and achievable diversity goals.
  • Participants will learn strategy for creating diverse and inclusive approaches for building strong and authentic relationships with students.

Working with international students: Deepening cross-cultural competence for effective counseling - knowledge, attitudes, and skills (Part1)

Presenter(s):

Yuka Kato
North Carolina State University Counseling Center

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Diversity/Inclusion/Equity

Abstract: International students provide cultural, academic, and economic benefits to colleges and the American society.  They commonly experience unique challenges, and those challenges may contribute to depression, anxiety, and/or poor academic performance.  Their underutilization of counseling services is well documented, but we want to provide effective services when they seek counseling.  Keum et al. (2022) examined large data from college counseling centers (CCMH) and suggested that therapists' work with international students was less effective than their work with domestic students on average, and that effectiveness in working with international students varied among therapists and among centers.   To help international students be successful in their journey, two consecutive sessions aim to deepen therapists' cross-cultural competence in the context of counseling international students.  Part 1 focuses on intercultural knowledge and Part 2 focuses on intercultural attitudes and skills.  Part 1  This focuses on intercultural knowledge in the context of counseling international students.  Although we cannot know all about many cultures international students bring in, therapists need to know and understand their common experience from students' viewpoints. This session includes cross-cultural transition, students' financial aspects, influence of immigration status, academic integrity differences, stress factors, symptoms and presentation, and barriers to seek support.

Learning Objectives:

  • To list at least three international students' challenges and stressors.
  • To describe international students' common symptoms and presentation in counseling.
  • To list at least two barriers for international students to seek support.

Friday, March 3, 2023
3:30PM - 5:00PM

Privacy vs. Confidentiality vs. Privilege: Information Sharing for College Counselors

Presenter(s):

Linda Abbott
TNG

Scott Strader
University of South Florida

Scott Lewis
TNG

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: Confidentiality is the foundation for ethical and compassionate mental health treatment. For mental health professionals working in a higher education setting, however, information sharing can be more complex than "I can't confirm or deny." Clinicians on college and university campuses must navigate information sharing with various stakeholders and help them understand the limitations clinicians face.    Additionally, counselors often serve on a behavioral intervention team (BIT) as up to 75% of cases referred to BITs involve a psychological component and behavioral issue. Given the challenges presented by nuanced cases such as behavioral health hospitalizations, concerning or disruptive behavior impacted by a mental health concern or other disability, or students requiring significant levels of care, counselors are often left struggling to provide adequate coordination of care while also assisting the college in responding appropriate to students' behavior and protecting client confidentiality.    This presentation will discuss privacy, confidentiality, and privilege, their purposes, and how clinicians can meet the needs of various stakeholders across campus while protecting the safety of clients and the community. The presenters will explain the role of the counselor on the BIT and the varying levels of information sharing to consider as a core member of a BIT.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will explain how privacy, confidentiality and privilege operate to protect the needs of clients.
  • Participants will discuss how college counselors who serve on BIT teams can effectively fulfill their ethical and professional responsibilities to clients while also meeting institutional needs to protect students and the college/university community.
  • Participants will prepare to navigate information sharing with various stakeholders and help them understand the limitations clinicians face.

Addressing the concerns of neurodivergent students

Presenter(s):

Gregory Bohner
Lindsey Wilson College

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: With the increase in prevalence of an autism spectrum disorder, more neurodivergent students are heading to college every year. However, the social environment of the college campus can be quite a transition from secondary education and present challenges not only with peers but also with faculty and staff. While more and more campuses are creating specialized programs to offer services for students, students may still seek services from various departments on campus including counseling services. This presentation will address common concerns and presenting problems for neurodivergent students and provide tools for assisting with a smooth transition to college by focusing on social, academic, and wellness growth strategies.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will identify typical challenges for neurodiverse students.
  • Participants will analyze strategies for inclusion in counseling practice.

Counselor Burnout: An Evidence-based Intervention Approach

Presenter(s):

Sue Haddad
Montgomery College

Tiffany Bartell
University of the Cumberlands

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: There is a risk for burnout in every occupation, but healthcare, mental health, and education professionals are particularly susceptible to burnout. In the absence of intervention, burnout can result in fatigue, withdrawal or detachment, increased absenteeism, and turnover, among other detrimental effects. With the increased work demands and stressors from the COVID-19 pandemic, many counseling professionals had to make quick adjustments in their work while managing their own personal stressors. Organizational leaders, supervisors, and professionals must understand the signs and progression of burnout in light of the increased turnover and resignation rates in higher education. Research demonstrates individual and organizational interventions can promote employee engagement and resiliency and show promise in combating burnout.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the signs and progression of burnout
  • Identify the causes of burnout
  • Explain the consequences of burnout
  • Distinguish personal versus organizational interventions
  • Apply specific strategies to increase employee engagement to reduce burnout

Creating a Collaborative Step Model Approach to Support Mental Health Needs on Your Campus

Presenter(s):

Rebecca Roberts
DePauw University

Malorie McGee
DePauw University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice  
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Session will focus on utilizing a step model to support student mental health. College Counseling Centers are inundated with individual therapy requests from the start of each school year. In order to meet mental health needs on our college campuses we often times need to develop a multifaceted approach to meeting those needs on campus both in Counseling Services and throughout the offices of your campus partners. This session highlights the benefits of having a step model in your counseling services office and a step model outside of your center by helping non-clinical staff learn when to refer to Counseling Services and when to connect students to other options that can meet their needs. This session will also host a discussion on ways to promote mental health programming on your campus through a collaborative effort by presenters and attendees.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how to develop a step model approach to addressing mental health needs on your campus
  • Identify ways to assess and create an individualized plan in session to begin tailoring a step model approach on your campus
  • Understand how to identify key points of entry for students who could benefit from mental health support and teach campus faculty and staff how to refer to the appropriate level of support
  • Learn ways to promote and grow attendance at groups, events, and other mental health programming in and out of the counseling services office

Empowered in Uncertainty: The Therapeutic Benefits of Psychoeducation on Emerging Adulthood

Presenter(s):

Brynne Schroeder
Empowered Pathways LLC

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice  

Abstract: Knowledge is power, but only when we know how to meaningfully apply the knowledge. This presentation showcases practical applications of psychoeducation on emerging adulthood for college students' psychosocial well-being. During this phase of life, students face significant tension while navigating the complexities of personal identity and the changing sociopolitical landscape. Research on emerging adulthood offers a meaningful framework for navigating big questions like "who do I want to be?" and "how can I plan for an ambiguous future?" during this period of uncertainty. Counselors can facilitate an understanding of developmental psychology that promotes healthy coping, nurtures holistic identity development, and builds self-efficacy. In the spirit of active learning, this presentation will feature several case examples and opportunities for discussion.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the core developmental tasks of emerging adulthood and evaluate their implications for mental health among college students
  • Apply knowledge of developmental psychology to aid clients in intentional exploration of their personal and community identities
  • Design evidence-based psychoeducation curriculum with practical applications for college students
  • Utilize psychoeducation interventions with a therapeutic balance of guidance and self-direction

New Horizons: Setting Sail for Increased Community Interventions

Presenter(s):

Justin St. Charles
Michigan State University - Office of the Provost: Undergraduate Education

Jessica Oyoque-Barron
Michigan State University Counseling and Psychiatric Services

Topic(s):

  • Administrative
  • Integrative Wellbeing: Community and Campus-wide mental health initiatives. Bringing students together in groups/community, Counselor Self-Care, and Counselor Resiliency.

Abstract: The demand for clinical services on college campuses globally are on the rise which requires college counseling centers to redefine the ways in which they promote safety, increase access, and reduce demand through large-scale outreach. The way that we can redefine and reimagine college counseling is by embracing macro-interventions (Glass, 2016) which includes participating in and utilizing undergraduate seminars (Conley et al., 2013), multicultural spaces (Glass, 2020), proximity-based care (Golightly et al., 2017), and intentional engagement with student organizations/pathway programs or student-participative summits/conferences (Glass, 2020). During this session, participants will engage in a conversation around community-based interventions, spend time evaluating the ways that their campus is currently utilizing intentional outreach and preventative programming (including effectiveness), and will leave the session with a 30-60-90 day preliminary strategic plan for increasing their community presence at their institution.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will identify ways higher education counseling professionals can incorporate innovative macro interventions to increase access and scope in their practice.
  • Participants will critically assess the current macro interventions that are currently being offered within their institution.
  • Participants will design a 30-60-90-post plan for introducing and operationalizing macro-interventions on their campus.

What's Next? Athletic Identity and Transition out of Sport

Presenter(s):

Bethany Garr
Converse University

R. Shea Fontana
Prisma Health

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice      

Abstract: Athletic identity has been defined as the degree to which an athlete identifies with their athletic role (Brewer, Van Raalte, & Linder, 1993). This identity may influence not only an athlete's experiences with sports, but also their interpersonal, emotional, physical, academic, and occupational functioning. When an athlete transitions out of sport--whether this transition was anticipated or unexpected--they may experience difficulties adjusting to these changes in their identity. As a result, many professionals working in college counseling centers may encounter student-athletes seeking help with transitioning from sports.   This session will focus on helping participants to gain a better understanding of the concept of athletic identity and its impact on various parts of the student-athlete's life, as well as offering interventions to help student-athletes to plan for, grieve, and adjust to retirement from sports.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define the concept of athletic identity.
  • Describe the impact of athletic identity on a student- athlete's interpersonal, emotional, physical, academic, and occupational functioning.
  • Discuss the impact of athletic identity on both planned and unplanned retirement from sports.
  • Identify counseling interventions aimed at helping student-athletes to plan for, grieve, and adjust to retirement from sports.

Working with international students: Deepening cross-cultural competence for effective counseling - knowledge, attitudes, and skills (Part 2)

Presenter(s):

Yuka Kato
North Carolina State University Counseling Center

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Diversity/Inclusion/Equity

Abstract: International students provide cultural, academic, and economic benefits to colleges and the American society.  They commonly experience unique challenges, and those challenges may contribute to depression, anxiety, and/or poor academic performance.  Their underutilization of counseling services is well documented, but we want to provide effective services when they seek counseling.  Keum et al. (2022) examined large data from college counseling centers (CCMH) and suggested that therapists' work with international students was less effective than their work with domestic students on average, and that effectiveness in working with international students varied among therapists and among centers.   To help international students be successful in their journey, two consecutive sessions aim to deepen therapists' cross-cultural competence in the context of counseling international students.  Part 1 focuses on intercultural knowledge and Part 2 focuses on intercultural attitudes and skills.    Part 2 This focuses on intercultural attitudes and skills in the context of counseling international students.  Attitudes component precede knowledge and skills (Deardorff, 2006) and significantly affect therapeutic alliance.  Skills component in this session includes intercultural communication skills, incorporating students' values and worldviews, and consideration for students with high risks.  All attendees are invited to join an open conversation to bring successes, questions, and challenges.

Learning Objectives:

  • To describe intercultural attitudes in the context of counseling international students.
  • To identify at least three skills in intercultural communication.
  • To identify at least one way to incorporate international students' values and worldviews in interventions.

Saturday, March 4, 2023
10:30AM - 12:00PM

Proactive vs. Reactive: Meeting the Unique Needs of a College Student Demographic

Presenter(s):

Brittany Hoover
Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice     
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Though identified as a critical component to college counseling, outreach performed by college counseling centers presents with its unique challenges (Glass, 2020). The 2020 Association for University College Counseling Center Directors' survey (AUCCCD) indicated that 90% of directors reported an increase in demand for services. Additionally, the 2020 AUCCCD survey indicated a 6,811% increase in demand for tele-mental health services between March 16,2020 - June 30, 2020 (AUCCCD, 2020). Given the immediate spike in demand for more "non-traditional" forms of mental health services, this continues to add to the confusion and ongoing frustration of outreach approaches that could provide students the tools and skills to decrease mental health symptoms and distress. This didactic educational session will focus on tools such as pre-recording lectures and interactive activities for faculty to apply in classroom settings, the web-based Togetherall mental health platform, collaboration between departments and use of social media to enhance outreach, as well as other integrative and creative approaches to providing a proactive response to student needs.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will gain insight into current best practices for outreach on college campuses.
  • Attendees will gain specific tools and programs that can contribute to their outreach efforts.
  • Attendees will be able to utilize learned material and use in their own college counseling centers.

Athletic Mindset: ways to engage athletes with Collegiate Recovery Programs

Presenter(s):

Kathleen (Katie) Sauls
West Virginia University Institute of Technology (WVU Tech)

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: With student-athletes recent deaths, many professionals and colleges have wondered how they could help athletes make better life choices.  The struggles of being an athlete at a college level are magnified if there is a potential to play the sport professionally.  This session focuses on the mental health concerns of athletes, including the attitude of perfection.  It discusses how Collegiate Recovery Programs can help athletes make better choices prior to substance misuse or abuse, including how to make better pro-social choices.  It also focuses on how an athletic perspective and mindset can be mutually beneficial to those in recovery.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe what Collegiate Recovery programs are and discuss why they are gaining momentum.
  • Explain the mental health concerns of student-athletes and compare/contrast those to the problems of students in recovery.
  • Discuss how Collegiate Recovery Programs and athletes have a mutually beneficial relationship.

A Trauma Informed Approach to Clinical Supervision

Presenter(s):

Zoya McCants
Long Island University

Shantà Bassett
LaGuardia Community College

Topic(s):

  • Clinical Supervision and Training
  • Administrative

Abstract: Clinical supervision has been the crux of the mental health counseling profession. Graduate students search diligently for clinical supervisors who are not only qualified but also efficient in their practice and willing to serve as supervisors. Post-graduation counselors continue their pursuit of identifying organizations that offer clinical experience and a clinical supervisor who will support their professional development and navigate them through the licensure process. Clinical supervisors are encouraged to use the pre-described supervision models when providing supervision. The models include developmental models, discrimination models, orientation-specific models, supervisory alliance models, and interactional supervision. Each provides goals for supervision and the roles of both the supervisor and supervisee. However, these models of supervision do not consider the current experiences and impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and the heightened awareness of social injustices and discrimination in the United States that has drastically impacted mental health. With a Trauma Informed approach to clinical supervision, supervisors are encouraged to consider their worldview in addition to their supervisees and clients. This method includes a pedagogy that leans into understanding race-based trauma and its impact on clinicians and clients, the value of trustworthiness and transparency, empowerment, and cultural and historical issues.

Learning Objectives:

  • List and describe at least 3 trauma-informed practices for supervisors to meet the specific needs of mental health providers and the community they serve.
  • Discuss the principles of trauma approaches and their application to clinical supervision.
  • Discuss strategies and tactics supervisors and supervisees can employ to build a strong relationship, address administrative tasks, and professional/licensure goals, and make ethical considerations
  • Assess and analyze how pandemic stress and social injustices have impacted mental health and how to devise a plan of action to assist mental health providers.
  • Identify the differences between administrative and clinical supervision.

Changing course without losing direction: One center's flexible, efficient, and sustainable response to meeting rising student mental health needs.

Presenter(s):

Bonnie VanderWal
Hope College

Aaron Schantz
Hope College

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: Responding to increased demand for mental health services with limited resources has been the crisis of college counseling centers over the past several years. Various policies and practices have been proposed to manage escalating student needs, especially for immediate access to services. Emerging models emphasize shifting to flexible and strategic methods to provide appropriate care (Shefet, 2018; Meek, 2021). In January 2020, counseling center staff in a small, private, religiously-affiliated liberal arts college in the Midwest transformed their service delivery model to feature same-day scheduling, variable session lengths, and treatment plans that maximize student agency. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight how the center's evolution over 5 semesters resulted in stable, effective, and viable care.  From their viewpoint as staff counselors, presenters share their journey from initial consideration and original implementation, through remote operations, and to current practice. The presentation includes sample schedules, usage statistics, and case examples that illustrate key considerations for other centers in looking at similar approaches for mental health care on campus. Special attention is given to concerns, growing pains, challenges, and rewards that redefined meeting the needs of students while preserving therapeutic integrity and the quality of work in college student mental health.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will compare their concerns about implementing a flexible service delivery model with the lived experience of staff counselors at an institution currently practicing a similar model.
  • Participants will apply components of flexible care to treatment of sample high- and low-acuity students using anonymized examples provided from the presenters' institution.
  • Participants will describe how their first and subsequent session activities would look within a more flexible service delivery model using their own theoretical orientations.

The Peace of Wild Things: Ecotherapy on College Campuses

Presenter(s):

Jill Casebolt
OSU- Cascades

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Ecotherapy is a growing field within the clinical world of mental health counseling. The premise of these "green" interventions is to reconnect individuals with Nature to address a plethora of concerns including stress, anxiety, depression, insomnia, PTSD and more. For the past several years, mental health counselors and those in the medical field have been recommending and even prescribing intentional time outdoors. Research indicates that these practices lead to improvements in mental and physical health symptom acuity and management.   Interventions include mindfulness-based practices, contextualizing human experience through a nature-based lens, developing personal belonging and relationship building in groups and nature-based art therapy.   Ecotherapy on and near college campuses is a free, underutilized and highly accessible form of individual and group treatment. Most campuses have grounds on which therapists can easily lead Ecotherapy interventions. Students can revisit these sites for personal practice in a variety of seasons. Even urban located campuses can access the benefits of Ecotherapy using plants, animals, weather and everyday life events such as a sunrises or sunsets.   As the Climate Crisis grows in our collective consciousness and students express more anxiety, disconnection, and fear, Ecotherapy is a natural choice for college counseling centers to embrace.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify 3 mental health benefits of Ecotherapy, as they relate to college students
  • Participants will develop 3 Ecotherapy-based interventions to use on-campus with students and 1 intervention available to use over telehealth platforms.

Implementation and Evaluation of Trauma-focused Group Therapy Treatments in a University Counseling Center

Presenter(s):

Chelsea Greer
University of South Alabama

Angelia Davis
University of South Alabama

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: Rates of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in general college student populations are around 12% (Boyraz et al., 2016) and almost all clinicians in University Counseling Center (UCC) settings report treating students for PTSD (Wilkinson et al., 2017). However, empirically supported treatments for PTSD are not commonly used in UCC settings. Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) is an empirically supported treatment for PTSD at individual and group levels (Resick et al., 2017) with a time-limited format that fits well within UCC treatment models.This presentation reviews the experience of implementing a CPT group within a UCC for the first time, challenges incurred, and creative solutions applied. Presenters will review findings related to efficacy of group treatment for PTSD, dropout within such groups, and guidelines for implementing this treatment within a UCC. Discussion will include comparison of structured CPT group treatment with a semi-structured trauma process group in consecutive semesters and tips for determining fit of type of trauma group within diverse UCCs.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe common challenges of conducting a Cognitive Processing Therapy based group within a college counseling center
  • Explain guidelines for effectively facilitating a trauma focused group in a college counseling center
  • Identify ways to determine fit between characteristics of counseling center setting and type of trauma group

How Are Community Colleges Meeting the Mental Health Needs of Students?

Presenter(s):

Amy Hayes Siler
Community College of Allegheny County

Amanda Allen
Wake Technical Community College

Topic(s):

  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues
  • Community College Focus

Abstract: There are rising mental health needs of college students (Gamache et al., 2019; Katz & Davison, 2012), which affect their academic performance and completion of studies (Dykes-Anderson, 2013; Wolfger, 2020). Students in community colleges tend to have additional barriers to success, including low socioeconomic and ethnic minority backgrounds (Shanker & Ip, 2018). They also face barriers to accessing mental health services in the community (Eisenberg et al., 2016; Shankar & Ip, 2018). Community colleges respond to students' mental health needs differently across the nation. Services may be similar to high school's such as personal counseling, referrals, and psychoeducation (Shankar & Ip, 2018); or they may resemble four-year colleges and universities that require counselors to have clinical licensure and offer mental health counseling (Mason, 2021). Students reportedly have experienced benefits from counseling services in community colleges, yet these counselors may only provide minimal counseling due to time constraints, multiple roles, and skill deficits (Shankar & Ip, 2018). This session will review student mental health needs and services of community college counseling centers. Participants will share practices that are working well at their institutions, current challenges, and what is needed to do our jobs better. Discussions will inform various advocacy efforts.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will recognize the trends of mental health needs of community college students
  • Participants will apply best practices of meeting mental health needs of community college students to their own work
  • Participants will evaluate ways to overcome challenges of working with students at their institutions
  • Participants will identify ways to advocate for meeting the mental health needs of their students

Welcome to Port:  Redefine & Rejuvenate

Presenter(s):

Christopher Corbett

Kathryn Alessandria
West Chester University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: The interdisciplinary, collegial, and collaborative process of the Higher Education Mental Health Alliance (HEMHA), which includes representatives from 9 organizations that focus on higher education policy and university/college mental health has resulted in several free white papers useful to practitioners and administrators alike. We will present our latest guide: Animals on Campus: Current Issues and Trends. We will: 1) discuss the purpose, scope and limitations of the guide; 2) explain the differences between service, therapy, and emotional support animals and the legal rights of access for each one; and, 3) using the guide’s case vignettes as a launching point we will review risks and legal and ethical issues associated with animals on campus, including accommodating and approving requests for Emotional Support Animals (ESAs). Key content on this topic will be highlighted. The presentations will be delivered by visual slides, didactics, and interactive discussion. The audience will be invited to share current issues and trends with HEMHA representatives to inform future resources.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss what the Higher Education Mental Health Alliance is and how to access their free resources;
  • Analyze practical and ethical dilemmas related to animals on campus;
  • Explain the differences between service animals, therapy animals, and emotional support animals and the current regulations related to each.

Saturday, March 4, 2023
1:30PM - 3:00PM

"Creativity is Magic:" Experiential Supervision Approaches to Foster & Support Supervisees' Social Justice Competencies, Professional Counselor Identity Development, and Clinical Restoration

Presenter(s):

Lorraine Joseph
Barry University

Katharine Heaton
Counseling Associates, LLC

Topic(s):    

  • Clinical Supervision and Training
  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: As counseling professionals, our code of ethics calls us to do no harm, promote well-being, advocate for the marginalized, and gain knowledge & understanding of how best to execute that call. One way to demonstrate our commitment to the counseling profession is to pledge to honor diversity and promote social justice as core values set forth by our profession. Further, creativity in counseling and supervision can encourage growth and new insights for clients, supervisees, and supervisors. Thus, this interactive presentation will include a brief overview on the importance of social justice competencies and professional counselor identity development, as well as current research on the therapeutic/supervisory use and benefits of creativity. Participants will engage in guided reflection exercises to provide them opportunities to examine their own personal experiences regarding social justice. Additionally, participants will learn and explore a variety of creative, experiential methods & techniques that enhance the supervisory relationship while increasing social justice competencies and counseling frameworks, skills, and techniques that can lead to clinical restoration. Finally, participants will leave the session with practical tools and information to incorporate into supervision that can bolster the social justice competencies, professional counselor identity development, and wellness of their supervisees.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore the role of professional identity development and social justice competencies in supervision
  • Describe how creativity in supervision can both strengthen the supervisory relationship and encourage new skills for the supervisee
  • List the therapeutic use and benefits of creativity
  • Discuss the value of examining social justice issues in supervision and how to broach these topics through creative approaches
  • Engage in creative activities that lead to clinical restoration

Grow Your Own Counselors

Presenter(s):

Makini Austin
Agnes Scott College

Malavika Patel
Agnes Scott College

Marshaya Rountree
Agnes Scott College

Melissa Velliquette
Agnes Scott

Courtney Ricketts
Agnes Scott College

Veronica Mahathre
Agnes Scott College

Topic(s):

  • Clinical Supervision and Training

Abstract: Working in a college counseling center does not seem to have the same appeal for clinicians as it once did and in recent years, hiring and retaining quality staff has become increasingly more difficult.  In this session learn how one college addressed these challenges by implementing a training model that offers a pathway to employment from graduate internship to fully licensed professional.  Hear from a group of clinicians at various stages of professional development as they discuss experiences of what worked well and what pitfalls were encountered on this journey develop and grow an effective college counseling center team.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will discuss primary challenges related to staff retention and overall job satisfaction.
  • Participants will identify opportunities to positively impact staff retention and job satisfaction.

A Nation Within a Nation: The Quiet Presence of the Gullah Geechee Community and How Historical Roots are Currently Impacting College Counseling

Presenter(s):

Kathryn Jones
Georgia Southern University

Maxine Bryant
Georgia Southern University

Topic(s):

  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: Enslaved Africans brought to the Low Country (coastal North and South Carolina, Georgia, and northern Florida) were held on the Sea Islands and formed their own communities and culture because of being separated from the mainland plantations.  This group of people became known as Gullah Geechee.  After chattel slavery ended, many Gullah Geechee people moved from the southern states with many of their descendants dispersed throughout our country.. Reportedly there are over 1 million people who identify as Gullah Geechee which means there are undoubtedly students at your institution who have Gullah Geechee heritage. Gullah Geechee people are survivors of years of generational trauma who contributed much to the fabric of our country.  This presentation will address myriad contributions of Gullah Geechee people, the historical oppression of the Gullah Geechee community, and the ways in which the historical oppression manifests in generational trauma that may present nationwide in the college student community. Through an interactive presentation we hope to guide attendees to address ways in which they can recognize signs of generational trauma and how to address this intrapersonally and through the therapeutic process, as well as how to begin the process of healing.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe and discuss the contributions of the Gullah Geechee community
  • Participants will be able to discuss the historical oppression of the Gullah Geechee community
  • Participants will be able to identify ways in which generational trauma presents in current college students and apply skills to promote healing

Queering the Ivory Towers: Utilizing Restorative Approaches to Support Identity Development and Community Building Among QTSOC

Presenter(s):

Jasmine Peters
Davidson College/University of North Carolina Charlotte

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Many universities and colleges are identifying new ways to adapt their systems to better support marginalized groups on campus. Most recently, institutions are looking at how restorative approaches, a practice rooted in Indigenous culture, can be implemented to reduce harm specifically as it relates to the student conduct processes. The following pilot study expands the use of restorative approaches beyond conduct and explores how counseling centers can use outreach initiatives to reinforce queer and trans students of color(QTSOC) health and well-being. Students, faculty, and staff who identified as BIPOC and LGBTQIA+ were invited to engaged in a one-day retreat where restorative and feminist approaches were utilized to promote identity exploration, community building, and wellness practices. Participants engaged in activities ranging from talking circles, outdoor experiences, and a dance party as a way of navigating these topics. The presenter will share her experience in the planning and implementation of the outreach initiative and discuss how students input from the day's activities has informed the clinical practices and services of the counseling center.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss the experiences of queer and trans students of color (QTSOC) and how these experiences impact their sense of identity, ability to build community, and wellness.
  • Demonstrate how restorative approaches can improve queer and trans students of color (QTSOC) well-being on college campuses.
  • Analyze how college counseling centers can use restorative approaches/initiatives to inform clinical practices and services when working with queer and trans students of color (QTSOC).

"Performative Social Justice": Black Students' Perspectives of University Counseling Centers at Predominantly White Institutions

Presenter(s):

Reyna Smith
University of the Cumberlands

Abstract: As mental health concerns amongst the college population continues to rise, UCCs must prioritize different methods and resources for supporting students (Lee et al., 2021). Black students continue to carry stigma related to seeking professional help, resulting in behaviors of self-concealment, and college counseling centers will see the underutilization of services by this specific population (Masuda, 2012). Previous research examined disparities in mental health service use in the United States, indicating that White college students utilized mental health treatment at twice the rate as Black students (Busby et al., 2019). Though efforts to create a campus climate free from racism, racially minoritized students continue to face issues of racial microaggressions, presumptive and negative stereotyping, underrepresentation, tokenization, and scrutiny (Linley, 2018). Directors and staff clinicians must understand the unique experiences of Black students and effective strategies to better support their psychological needs. Based on dissertation research focusing on Black college student mental health and social justice efforts of UCC's, this presentation will raise awareness of the perceived barriers to mental health services Black students face rooted in historical oppression, and explore best practices through direct care, strategic hiring, collaboration with campus leaders, and outreach efforts, all through a social justice lens.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify specific barriers to treatment faced by Black students.
  • Participants will discuss and explore best practices for support the mental health needs of Black students.
  • Participants will understand the importance of advocating for marginalized populations who hold stigmatized beliefs related to mental health and professional help.

Culturally responsive international student suicide prevention: Practical applications for college counselors

Presenter(s):

Lindsay Lundeen
University of Georgia

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: In advanced skills courses, counselors receive training on the basics of suicide prevention and crisis counseling. However, crisis counseling training can often be a "one size fits most" approach that does not work with individuals of minoritized identities, let alone individuals who are not from this country. This presentation will provide attendees with background knowledge about international student identity change and acculturation stressors, information on how to broach and incorporate topics of intersectionality into a crisis counseling session, a refresher on empirically supported suicide risk assessments used in general counseling practice, as well as practical applications, topics, and techniques to utilize during a suicide risk assessment with international student clients. The presentation will end with an opportunity to practice newly learned skills and engage in dialogue about how to prevent harm and promote international student mental health help-seeking on college campuses.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will be able to describe acculturation and identity change stressors and how each can impact international student mental health and suicidality.
  • Attendees will be able to describe how topics of broaching and intersectionality can be utilized in a crisis counseling session with an international student.
  • Attendees will be able to describe current empirically supported crisis counseling intervention strategies and will be able to determine whether such strategies are effective to utilize with their international student clients.
  • Attendees will be able to effectively utilize the topics of broaching, intersectionality, and acculturation stress in a culturally responsive way with international students in crisis.
  • Attendees will be able to describe ways to facilitate better mental health outcomes when counseling international students in crisis and/or supervising a counseling intern working with international students.

Sex Positivity and Sexual Health as a Competency within the Profession

Presenter(s):

Mark Taracuk
Georgia Southern University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice 

Abstract: Human sexuality is an essential component of human development but can be difficult to talk about in clinical work as our views and opinions come heavily into play. When engaging in clinical work, how do we discuss sex and sexual health with clients? Do clients know they can talk about sex in session? Are we creating a space where this integral aspect of human development is welcomed? Through the lens of sex positivity and the need for sexual health to be a competency in our field, this session will talk about how we can best serve clients across their lifespan as we increase our familiarity and comfort with this topic to integrate this vital aspect of human development into our work.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe the concept of sex positivity
  • Participants will be able to describe at least three tenets of sex positivity
  • Participants will be able to identify at least one strategy towards increasing their own competency with regards to sexual health
  • Participants will be able to describe the benefits of positive integration of sex positivity into counseling work

Saturday, March 4, 2023
3:30PM - 5:00PM

Lessons Learned from Conducting Group and Individual Counseling with College Age Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities within a Comprehensive Transition Program

Presenter(s):

Julie Hill
Auburn University

Betty Patten
Auburn University

Claire Carriere Hebert
Auburn University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • This is also appropriate for disability as well as innovative counseling theory/practice, which was not an option to select.

Abstract: As of 2017, approximately 7.3 million people in the United States have an intellectual and/or developmental disability(IDD) (University of Minnesota, 2020).  Individuals with IDD experience anxiety and depression and other mental health issues at higher rates than typically developing peers, but often face issues with accessing care and finding knowledgeable providers.  There are at least 265 comprehensive transition programs for students with intellectual disabilities on college campuses across the country, but many counselors are not adequately trained in how to work with individuals with intellectual disabilities and many college counseling centers are not prepared to facilitate counseling for these types of students. This presentation will provide information about a model used at one university that coordinated a partnership between a comprehensive transition program (CTP) and a clinical rehabilitation counseling program housed within a counselor education program. The director of the CTP and the faculty member/counselor will share lessons learned from getting the counseling program off the ground and how they structure group and individual counseling, as well as how those services were adapted to meet the needs of individuals with intellectual disabilities.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe the mental health challenges facing young adults with intellectual disabilities.
  • Participants will be able to apply the lessons learned from the presenters about counseling young adults with intellectual disabilities to their own programs or counseling centers.
  • Participants will be able to explain how to modify traditional counseling techniques and strategies to meet the needs of individuals with intellectual disabilities.

Understanding ADHD: A Framework for Helping Students Manage Symptoms

Presenter(s):

Julia Sanford
The University of Alabama at Birmingham

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: ADHD is a commonly misunderstood diagnosis, especially in high achieving college students. In this session, the presenter will describe her own experience being diagnosed with ADHD as an undergraduate student, explore signs and symptoms of ADHD, and provide practical resources for practitioners treating students with ADHD. This session will also include discussion related to barriers and limitations to diagnosis and treatment, and offer resources for supporting students who struggle with focus and motivation but do not meet DSM criteria for an ADHD diagnosis.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss symptoms of ADHD
  • Identify strengths of students with ADHD and related concerns
  • Explain barriers of obtaining a diagnosis
  • Utilize practical resources for the treatment of ADHD
  • Create collaborative treatment plans with students

A comprehensive approach to supporting the mental health of BIPOC students

Presenter(s):

Sharon Mitchell
University at Buffalo

Amani Johnson
University at Buffalo

Frankie Kraft
University at Buffalo

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Although BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of color)  students now represent almost 50% of students enrolled in U.S. colleges and universities, on average, white and Asian students earn a college-level credential at a rate about 20 percentage points higher than Hispanic and black students do (National Center for Educational Attainment, 2017). Native American students saw a 3% decline in persistence in the fall 2021 after the start of the COVID pandemic (National Center for Educational Attainment, 2022). The Healthy Minds Study found that nationally from 2013 to 2021 the prevalence of symptoms of depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation increased most significantly among BIPOC students. (Lipson et al, 2022).  The unique mental health challenges and needs for historically marginalized racial and ethnic students include structural racism, racial microaggressions, model-minority stereotypes, and the role that cultural beliefs play in seeking help for mental health issues (Breen & Gonzales, 2022; Hingwe, 2021).  This presentation aims to describe a comprehensive approach to supporting the emotional health of BIPOC students that includes staffing models, developing diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice values, clinical considerations, non-clinical strategies for promoting mental health of BIPOC students, and institutional challenges and opportunities for implementing this very important work.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe 3 sociocultural factors impacting the mental health of BIPOC students.
  • Apply 3 social justice concepts to the delivery of mental health programs and services.
  • Discuss 3 strategies for making institutional changes to better meet the needs of BIPOC students
  • Assess your counseling center's current readiness to support the mental health of BIPOC students.

Awe-Titude:Seizing Joy and Creating Connections in a Hurting World

Presenter(s):

Tamara Grosz-Knapp-
University of North Texas

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Drawing from research and practice in Positive Psychology, this interactive presentation will demonstrate how the emotion of Awe can be utilized to increase both counselor and student well-being. An ancient emotion, Awe has particular relevance in today's challenging and often disconnected and hurting world. This session will describe and demonstrate practical strategies and interventions that counselors can utilize both personally and professionally. Cross-cultural research in the area of awe will also be addressed.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to define the emotion of Awe.
  • Participants will be able to identify a minimum of 5 benefits of Awe.
  • Participants will be able to describe and practice a minimum of 5 strategies for eliciting awe in their own lives and in the lives of the students they support.

College Counseling 2023: Counselor Educators' Leading by Example

Presenter(s):

Brittany Hoover
Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Topic(s):

  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: The 2021 Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors' survey (AUCCCD) indicated current directors' of college counseling centers having an average of 1-5 years of experience as a director and holding the professional identity of Psychology (50%), Counseling (35%), or Social Work (10%) (AUCCCD, 2021). Given the ongoing demand and fluctuation for mental health services, specific to College Counseling Centers, there appears to be an ongoing increase in demand for services, while also a spike in professional burnout and turnover rates of college counseling center faculty (AUCCCD, 2020). Ongoing issues such as extensive waitlists, workloads, isolation, decreased pay, continue to rise as the demand for mental health services of the college student demographic increase. This educational session will address the ongoing rise in demand by providing current statistics and published research. This educational session will also provide attendees with ample insight and collaboration related to building staff morale, programming, as well as meeting the demands of the student population via resources such as the 2024 CACREP standards, 2020 IACS standards, and best practices for College Counseling Centers. Attendees will be encouraged to model "group think" as well as reframing mentality of "me versus you" to "us against the problem."

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will gain insight into current best practices regarding accreditation, programming, improving staff morale and decreasing waitlists.
  • Attendees will be able to identify ways in which they can improve their college counseling centers.
  • Attendees will be able to apply learned material in their own college counseling centers.

Supervision and Stewardship: Effective Gatekeeping Approaches to Managing Counselor and Trainee Impairment

Presenter(s):

Bethany Garr
Converse University

Topic(s):

  • Clinical Supervision and Training

Abstract: Working with supervisees who are struggling with impairment can be one of the more challenging responsibilities that clinical supervisors may face. Counselor and trainee impairment can take on many forms, including inability or unwillingness to meet professional or ethical standards for behavior, inadequate grasp of those skills necessary for professional competence, and an inability to control emotional or behavioral responses that results in interference with the counselor's professional functioning (Lamb, 1987). It is vital for supervisors to manage these challenges effectively, as failure to fulfill gatekeeping obligations can lead to a variety of issues, including departmental conflict and morale issues, impact on public loss of trust in the profession, legal implications, inadequate care for clients, and harm to clients. This session will focus on helping participants to gain a better understanding of gatekeeping and impairment, as well as identifying approaches that that may be effective in the prevention, early intervention, and resolution of cases of counselor/trainee impairment.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the concepts of gatekeeping and gateslipping.
  • Discuss supervisors' ethical obligation to engage in timely, effective gatekeeping.
  • Define impairment and describe behaviors that are associated with counselor and intern/trainee impairment.
  • Identify strategies aimed at prevention and early intervention around impairment in counselors and interns/trainees, including policy development, formal and informal feedback, modeling, supervision contracts, and the use of a developmental approach to su
  • Identify strategies to appropriately and effectively address and resolve impairment in counselors and interns/trainees, including formal and informal evaluations and professional development plans.

Addressing Trauma & Depression in Students of Color at Community Colleges

Presenter(s):

Zoya McCants
Long Island University

Shantà Bassett
LaGuardia Community College

Topic(s):

  • Community College Focus

Abstract: This presentation will allow participants to discuss depression and trauma experienced by students of color attending community colleges. It will review statistics on suicide rates in this unique group; and elaborate on social and racial injustices; environmental and social determinants of health that impact mental health and outcomes. For example, a New York Times article (Feb 2019) reported the following: "More than 60 percent of college students said they had experienced overwhelming anxiety in the past year." According to the American College Health Association, "over 40 percent said they felt so depressed they had difficulty functioning..." More recently, during the Covid-19 pandemic and the heightened awareness of social and racial injustices, students have encountered more mental health problems and sought help in record numbers from college counseling centers. This group of students has also reported higher housing and food insecurity rates. With this knowledge, our role as mental health professionals is to assist students dealing with past traumas while helping them navigate their basic needs. This presentation will provide participants with the tools to build rapport, explore trauma causes, and identify depression and anxiety when it looks like physical ailments, changes in behavior, or withdrawal from support systems.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will be able to recognize at least 1 of their own personal biases and identify 2 clinical strategies to employ when engaging students of color.
  • Attendees will identify at least 2 methods to show how they would establish trust in therapeutic sessions and utilize community resources when working with college students.
  • Attendees will identify at least 2 methods to develop a deeper understanding of the impact of the students of color cultural group experiences (such as racism, microaggressions, policing in urban neighborhoods, barriers to learning, etc.) to enhance empat
  • Attendees will have the ability to apply at least 3 skills to recognize and address cultural barriers to improve session outcomes.

Redefining Counseling: Developing and Implementing a Holistic Community College Mental Health Program

Presenter(s):

Jessica Contreras
Joliet Junior College

Michael Liacone
Joliet Junior College
 

Abstract: Established in Fall 2019, Joliet Junior College (JJC) implemented a new mental health model that separated mental health counseling from academic counseling. This separation occurred at great timing before the implementation of the Mental Health Early Action on Campus Act (MHEAC) in Illinois and the unforeseen pandemic of Covid-19. Through innovative approaches along with data tracking and advocacy, JJC has worked to create the Student Mental Health & Wellness Program (SMHWP). SMHWP has set the foundation for a holistic and wrap-around approach when it comes to meeting student mental health needs. 

In this 90-minute presentation, Jessica Contreras, LCPC, and Michael Liacone, LCPC, will discuss strengths and challenges when it comes to separating from the advising/counseling model, share approaches to getting staff and faculty involved when identifying student needs, and creating a wrap around approach to student mental health that incorporates case management techniques and alternative approaches to direct mental health services.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will receive an overview of the strengths and challenges of separating from an advising/counseling model when it comes to mental health support for students.
  • Attendees will identify alternative strategies to support and expand capacity to meet student mental health needs on a community college campus.
  • Attendees will analyze how collaborations both on and off campus can assist in creating a wrap-around approach to care when it comes to serving students holistically to meet their mental health needs.

Sunday, March 5, 2023
8:30AM - 10:00AM

REFLECTION OF THREE YEARS IN SUPERVISION AS AN INTERNATIONAL PRACTICUM AND INTERNSHIP STUDENT AND PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR

Presenter(s):

Ibrahim  
Ohio University

Topic(s):

  • Clinical Supervision and Training
  • Multicultural Supervision with International Counseling Students

Abstract: The number of international students in counseling programs has increased over time in the USA due to the emphasis on diversity. To complete practicum and internship requirements, future international counselors may tend to choose college counseling settings because of the advantages such as location, visa status, etc. The needs of international counseling students to develop a multiculturally competent professional identity with support in the supervision process are unique and differ from their domestic peers. In this outbreak session, the presenter will share his supervision experiences as an international practicum and internship student and a current licensed professional counselor in a public university. In addition, this reflection session will also include information about the multicultural supervision competencies model and will provide new strategies for supervisors working with international counseling students.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describing the needs of international supervisees needs in supervision
  • Applying multicultural sensitive supervision models while working with international supervises.

Managing the Various Roles and Responsibilities of Today's College Counselors

Presenter(s):

Adrianna English
University of Montevallo

Josh Miller
University of Montevallo

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: As colleges and universities deal with increasingly complex mental health concerns, safety issues, and demand for services, college counselors have been asked to perform many different roles and take on additional responsibilities. In addition to counselors providing traditional individual and group services, today's college counselors provide crisis intervention, risk assessments, consultation, supervision, and outreach. In addition, college counselors are asked to be on behavioral intervention teams, serve on university committees, and perform administrative duties. How does a college counselor balance these complex and sometimes competing roles? How do college counselors maintain a strong professional identity and avoid burnout in the midst of ever-changing demands or requests?  This session will examine how the varied roles of college counselors intersect with the expectations of the campus community, professional ethics, and current best practices and will look at strategies for ethical decision-making, maintaining professional identity, and managing professional challenges associated with performing varied roles.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify the various roles that college counselors perform and understand how those roles intersect with the expectations of the campus community, professional ethics, and current best practices.
  • Participants will be able to identify various strategies for managing ethical dilemmas and maintaining a well-defined professional identity.

Addressing Eating Disorders on College Campuses

Presenter(s):

Jessica Ofray
Central Connecticut State University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: This presentation will provide attendees with an overview of eating disorders/disordered eating, how they develop, the impact it has emotions/mood/physical health, and the unique experience of supporting college students who struggle with eating disorders/disordered eating. There will be a discussion on how college counseling professionals and other disciplines could work together to provide students support and services using a multidisciplinary approach.  o     The BioPsychoSocial model in relation to the development of an eating disorder o   Signs and Symptoms for eating disorders and disordered eating patterns o           The risk factors on college campuses that can influence eating disorders  o          How to support someone struggling with an eating disorder/disordered eating in individual and group counseling o   Implementing a multidisciplinary approach for the best treatment outcomes on campus

Learning Objectives:

  • Professionals will be able to list and describe the signs and symptoms of eating disorders/ disordered eating, and explain the BioPsychoSocial model as it relates to the development and influence of eating disorders.
  • Professionals will be able to identify the social, emotional, cognitive, and health risks related to eating disorders.
  • Professionals will identify and overcome the barriers to providing eating disorder/disordered eating specific care on college and university campuses.
  • Professionals will apply communication skills in approaching students about receiving treatment services. Professionals will analyze the benefits of working with a multidisciplinary team, utilizing both campus and community resources.

Counselor Self-Care and Burnout: Creating a life you do not want to quietly quit from

Presenter(s):

Brooke Snow
Wittenberg University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: It is no secret that the world has changed significantly since COVID-19.  In the past (nearly) three years, the youth in our country have grown more anxious and depressed as a result of social isolation, decreased opportunity for autonomy, and the overall inability to create and sustain reliable routines.  Add the massive increase in gun violence in school settings, it is no surprise that mental health is at the very forefront of the minds of Generation Z.  Due to rising demand for counseling services paired with a lack of funding for resources, higher ed counseling professionals are struggling to manage burnout and other health concerns as a result of poor work-life balance.  The purpose of this presentation is to provide information on current trends in counseling profession related to burnout as well as provide the opportunity for participants to explore new ways of implementing self-care in their day to day lives. Participants will be encouraged to consider their personal and professional Love Languages as guides to creating self-care strategies and explore ways to encourage team building activities to improve office relationships and support.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore trends related to counselor burnout across the country
  • Identify personal needs and ways to implement self-care strategies
  • Explore ideas of collaborative/team-based self-care tactics to improve moral as a safety measure against burnout

A Phenomenological Study of Transgender and Gender Diverse Collegiate Athletes

Presenter(s):

Myranda Warfield
Western Carolina University & the University of Florida

Topic(s):

  • Advocacy

Abstract: The increasing prevalence of out transgender people, especially youth ages 13-17 who make up the largest percentage of the estimated 1.6 million transgender and gender diverse (TGGD) identified people within the United States, means that the transgender community is growing and likely to be part of the nearly 480,000 athletes that go on to participate in collegiate sports. However, systemic barriers, that are informed and upheld by Eurocentric colonial belief systems, means that many of these student athletes are not able to compete in college sports. As of September 2022, 18 states have banned transgender students from participating in sports consistent with their gender identity.  While research has shown the mental health disparities experienced by TGGD populations, participation in sports has shown to be one activity that can act as a protective factor for mental health issues in the general population. Currently there is a dearth in the literature on transgender collegiate athletes' lived experiences with these, and other, intersecting identities. A qualitative phenomenological study can enhance college counselors' understanding of the phenomena of the experiences of transgender collegiate athletes and better inform us about the mental health and advocacy needs of this population. This is an ongoing study.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to analyze how Western colonialist constructs have informed policies, legislations, and beliefs about sports and apply this knowledge to current systems impacting transgender and gender diverse athletes.
  • Participants will be able to compare the literature findings on the experiences of transgender and gender diverse college students & collegiate athletes.
  • Participants will be able to describe the systems of oppression that transgender and gender diverse athletes face in college.
  • Participants will be able to use and share resources that contribute towards current advocacy efforts and initiatives being done for transgender and gender diverse college athletes within the college counseling profession.

Role Modeling and Experiential Avoidance in Supervision: An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Conceptualization of Leaning into Supervision

Presenter(s):

Melissa Porter
Vanderbilt University

Anabella Wilson
Vanderbilt University

Topic(s):     

  • Clinical Supervision and Training

Abstract: Engaging in supervision is a key piece of the work completed by many providers in college counseling settings.  Supervisors often feel rejuvenated by training the next generation of providers and by remaining abreast of all topics in our field.  This presentation will utilize an Acceptance and Commitment (ACT) based approach to supervision, addressing the "why" behind our desire to be supervisors, the impact of role modeling on trainees for their growth and ours as supervisors, the frequent use of experiential avoidance in supervision seen in the supervisory relationship and in therapy sessions, and the cost to trainees of not addressing these areas of avoidance.  Discussion will focus on key aspects and skills that can be utilized in supervision with trainees and help contribute to being an effective supervisor focused on the growth of the trainee.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the key elements of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as it relates to engaging in supervision.
  • Identification of three places where experiential avoidance is typically experienced or shows up in supervision and the impact on both the supervisor, trainee, and field of practice if not addressed.
  • Identify two ways in which role modeling can be implemented in supervision to benefit the training experience.
  • Utilize two skills to implement into supervision sessions to enhance the growth opportunities for trainees.

Harm Reduction on College Campuses

Presenter(s):

Alex Kerwin
University of Mississippi

Lauren Gallagher
University of Mississippi

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice     
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Harm reduction strategies prevent the most severe consequences of risky behaviors while maintaining the dignity and autonomy for those struggling with drug or alcohol dependencies. The University of Mississippi has taken the initiative to ensure that students are kept as safe as possible when they engage in risky behaviors. We accept, for better or worse, that drug and alcohol use is part of college campuses and we choose to work to minimize its harmful effects rather than simply ignore or condemn them. Our goal is to educate students about the impact of alcohol and drug use and get them to learn more about how their thoughts, feelings, and beliefs affect their drinking and using. This presenters will showcase this student-centered, educational program designed to help college students develop a healthy lifestyle by recognizing and reducing the potential harm associated with alcohol or other substance use.  Harm reduction is an evidence-based theory that attempts to mitigate the effects of these problems. These strategies create safer environments in the event of emergencies, such as overdoses, and equip people to keep themselves safe if they decide to take part in risky behaviors.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will learn about and obtain the University of Mississippi's Harm Reduction curriculum.
  • Participants will learn about the bystander effect, medical amnesty policy, Narcan on campus, and the Good Samaritan Law.
  • Participants will complete a values clarification, SMART goal, and learn how negative cognitions and core beliefs can impact substance abuse.
  • Participants will receive alcohol and drug education including blood alcohol content calculator and the point of diminishing returns, social norming, and signs of an overdose.

Experiences of Students Hospitalized for Psychiatric Crises: Who is at risk and what can we improve?

Presenter(s):

Erin Morpeth-Provost
University of Texas at Austin

Topic(s):

  • Research and Program Evaluation

Abstract: College students with psychiatric disabilities have an increased risk of attrition from higher education, particularly those with severe distress. They may be hospitalized for psychiatric crises if there is potential risk to their safety. Although the degree of pathology severity in incoming college students has increased over the last decade, hospitalized students remain an under-researched group. The present study sought to explore the characteristics and experiences of hospitalization college students at the University of Texas at Austin in three ways: (1) Fisher's test comparisons of demographic and variables in the hospitalization sample (n=880) compared to a 5-year average of the entire student body; (2) cross-tabulations and chi-square tests of independence of demographic, academic, and clinical variables and hospital admission status (voluntary or involuntary); and (3) qualitative interviews (n=10) about students' experiences with psychological services prior to hospitalization, the hospitalization process, the hospitalization itself, and post discharge. Data was analyzed using a content analysis approach. Results showed several groups of students who may be at risk for psychiatric hospitalization. Interview participants had complex and nuanced experiences with hospitalization. Themes included neutral experiences with psychological services pre-hospitalization, trust/distrust, powerlessness, interpersonal connections, uncertainty, negative perceptions of the university, academic supports, and shifted perspectives.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learners will be able to describe demographic and academic characteristics of students who may be at greater risk of psychiatric hospitalization.
  • Learners will be able to describe demographic, academic, and clinical characteristics of students who may be at greater risk of involuntary hospitalization.
  • Learns will be able to explain common themes among how students describe their experiences with hospitalization and how these themes impact their roles as students.
  • Learners will be able to discuss potential areas of improvement, communication, and collaboration in the process of hospitalizing college students for psychiatric distress.

Sunday, March 5, 2023
10:30AM - 12:00PM

It Takes A Village: Reshaping Counseling Center and Faculty Partnerships to Strengthen Student Mental Health

Presenter(s):

Leah Finch
The Jed Foundation

Jeni Willenzik
The Jed Foundation

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: College counselors are familiar with receiving emails and phone calls from faculty that begin with "I have a student who..." Counseling centers have always received these consultation requests from faculty, but as student needs evolve, and as student mental health becomes more of a campus-wide issue, faculty have an increasingly integral role to play. Between referrals, outreach requests, and consultation needs, what are the best ways that today's college counseling centers can support faculty, and where are the gaps? This session will explore qualitative and quantitative data showcasing faculty needs, discuss common barriers faculty face in supporting student mental health, and redefine the ways that college counseling centers can support faculty through consultation, resources, policies, and outreach.

Learning Objectives:

  • Demonstrate interventions to help faculty support student mental health
  • Utilize qualitative and quantitative data showcasing faculty needs in supporting student mental health
  • Cultivate new ideas to engage with faculty on their campuses

From Therapy to Therapeutics: A Holistic Model of Care for Higher Education in the Covid Era

Presenter(s):

Matthew Walsh
Oasis Mental Health Applications/Duquesne University

Ian Edwards
Duquesne University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: The "new normal" a phrase used a lot during the last two years signaled a need for counseling centers to adapt, pivot, and re-imagine service delivery (e.g., in person vs Telehealth), staffing, resources, and models of care. In many settings, the opportunity for a "new normal" was temporary as the cultural winds are shifting back to the shores of old systems and any "new" approaches need to fit into the old systems and traditional therapy models.   In the era of Covid-19 we propose a paradigm shift from a customer service orientation (i.e., traditional therapy) to a therapeutic orientation. We don't view psychological health issues as an individual phenomenon but as a byproduct of societal, familial, cultural, political, and even spiritual forces, and therefore, warrants a response from the entire community, with interdisciplinary practices being central to the promotion of wellbeing.  Our presentation will introduce participants to our whole-person developmental model highlighting a shift from prevention to promotion of wellbeing. Our multifaceted approach leverages technology with a human touch to enhance human connection, wellness practices, and 24/7 support. We will offer data results from a year partnership between Oasis Mental Health Application and Duquesne University's Center for Student Wellbeing.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe a model of care that moves from symptom focus to prevention to wellbeing promotion.
  • Plan for a shift in emphasis toward developing a community of care, a therapeutic culture in college and university campuses.
  • Apply practical strategies at your university or college to improve campus wellbeing and mitigate traditional therapy usage.

Examining Methods of Building Solidarity across Racial and Ethnic Minority (REM) College Students through Intergroup Counseling

Presenter(s):

Hyemi Jang
North Carolina State University

Briana Kemp
North Carolina State University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: In the US higher education, racial and ethnic minority (REM) college students continue to experience racial discrimination and microaggressions ranging from purposeful attack or avoidance to unconscious rudeness and exclusion. These adverse experiences are known to be detrimental to REM students' mental health, resulting in college maladjustment and lowered academic performance. Especially, researchers have found that racial discrimination hinders REM students from feeling socially connected in the college community, whereas social connectedness is known to serve as a moderator for alleviating negative impacts of racism. Therefore, group counseling may be beneficial for REM students to restore a safe environment to navigate their racial identity and build social connection with people who share similar struggles. Specifically, intergroup counseling can provide unique advantages for REM college students. The negative perceptions towards diverse groups are known to be linked to feelings of perceived threat regarding these "out-groups" and researchers suggest intergroup counseling as a possible remedy for reducing negative stereotypes and biases towards marginalized groups. Thus, this presentation aims to provide insight and implications for college counselors to provide intergroup counseling as ways to facilitate healing and build solidarity across different racial groups within the college setting.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will learn the impact of oppression and racial discrimination on racial and ethnic minority (REM) students' mental health and academic success.
  • Attendees will understand the benefits of intergroup counseling for REM college students.
  • Attendees will discuss the different ways to facilitate intergroup counseling to produce healing and build solidarity among different REM student groups.

Providing the best care to students before, during, and after psychiatric hospitalization

Presenter(s):

Linda Abbott
TNG

Scott Strader
University of South Florida

Scott Lewis
TNG

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: Managing students' behavioral health hospitalizations can be a difficult balance for a clinician. There is the immediate anxiety of realizing that a client poses a serious risk to themselves or others, ensuring that appropriate procedures are followed, and determining how to get students the care they need. Are consents necessary so that others can be informed of potential risk? What are the legal and ethical implications for clinicians and institutions in balancing the individual needs of the student, the safety of the broader community, and compliance with existing laws and regulations? Can students be protected from potentially damaging academic consequences? What's the best way to reintegrate students back into the college environment? Managing these cases can be daunting and present clinicians with multiple dilemmas. This presentation will explore these questions and help clinicians be better prepared to navigate a wide array of challenges while compassionately caring for students.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will discuss the clinical, legal, and ethical considerations involved when a student is hospitalized for mental health reasons.
  • Participants will apply the relevant case law and ADA regulations related to psychiatric hospitalizations and leaves of absence.
  • Participants will explore ways to utilize their campus BIT/CARE team to help support students who may need hospitalization or leave of absence due to mental health concerns.

PTSD in College Students: Mitigating the Impact of Trauma on Postsecondary Students

Presenter(s):

Amy Banko
Rutgers, School of Health Professions

Brittany Stone
Rutgers, School of Health Professions

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice  

Abstract: Traumatic stress and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among college students have been linked to poor academic performance and an increased risk of college drop-out. Typical PTSD symptoms include trouble sleeping, headaches, flashbacks, feelings of hopelessness, and trouble concentrating, which may interfere with successful academic performance (Barry et al., 2012). These symptoms have been shown to impact overall educational attainment, specifically accounting for 14.2% of high school drop-out and 4.7% of college drop-out in the United States. College retention is also significantly lower among those diagnosed with PTSD, in contrast with those exposed to trauma but not diagnosed with PTSD. These individuals are at a higher risk for academic difficulties and tend to utilize less effective coping strategies to manage their trauma-related distress. Thus, there is clearly a significant need to build college counselors' competencies to support students in mitigating the functional implications of trauma and PTSD on students' postsecondary academic performance.

Learning Objectives:

  • The learner will be able to describe how traumatic stress and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder impact students in the postsecondary academic setting.
  • The learner will apply college counseling strategies to mitigate the impact of traumatic stress and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder on college students.

CARES Model: A Conceptual Framework for the Supervision of Counselors in Training and New Professionals

Presenter(s):

Halima Dargan
American University

Topic(s):

  • Clinical Supervision and Training
  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: The CARES model for counseling supervision that I am introducing is an inclusive model that contains the three domains of personal, professional, and community. Cultural competency, social justice, and clinical knowledge are at the foundation of this model. As the field changes and evolves, training for new counselors and new counselor educators should as well. This model also ensures a multicultural focus in the training journey. This presentation will explore the need for integrative, inclusive and competent supervision of counselors-in-training and new counseling professionals. It will present a model for supervision in counselor education that addresses three domains and their corresponding components: the personal domain which includes the components of (1) counseling, (2) awareness, (3) radical candor, (4) efficacy, and (5) self-care. The professional domain which includes components of (1) collaboration, (2) advocacy, (3) research, (4) evaluation, and (5) skill development. The community domain which includes the components of (1) commitment, (2) accountability, (3) relationships, (4) engagement, and (5) social justice. Background research regarding the existing models, and foundational domains and components of the proposed model, suggestions for implementation, and preliminary data will be explored as well.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to demonstrate an understanding of supervision and it's significance to the field
  • Participants will gain knowledge of the theoretical foundation of this model and apply knowledge gained to the supervision process
  • Participants will gain knowledge and awareness of social and cultural issues supervision, and demonstrate the ability to implement culturally sensitive interventions

Implementing Intercultural Therapy

Presenter(s):

Lashia Bowers
Coastal Carolina University

Letitia Minor
Coastal Carolina University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice 

Abstract: There is a clear need for effective therapeutic approaches to meet the diverse needs of college students. Yet, there is a paucity of research on implementing intercultural therapy on a college campus.  Coastal Carolina University created a Counselor and Intercultural Specialist position in August, 2020. This position focuses on providing outreach and counseling to marginalized populations on campus. This presentation will share best practices for engaging socially marginalized students, practicing cultural humility, and implementing non-traditional approaches to psychotherapy. An intercultural therapeutic approach requires counselors to be aware of how intersectionality impacts the client worldview.  Power and privilege centered around various isms (racism, sexism, ableism etc.) should be acknowledged in the counseling process.  Engaging students through outreach circles, affinity groups, and healing spaces will be explored as a way to center historically marginalized students. Before embarking on non-traditional approaches to mental health, counselors must have the skills and knowledge to provide cultural humility to each individual client they serve.  Centering cultural humility as a leadership value sets the foundation for counselors to feel comfortable to incorporate nontraditional psychotherapeutic approaches into their practice. Counseling interventions such as incorporating spirituality, honoring ancestors, ubuntu relationship building, and incorporating sound will be explored.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to define intercultural therapy and examine ways they can advocate for marginalized students on their perspective campus.
  • Participants will assess their cultural humility knowledge and skills and discuss ways they can take action to improve their cultural humility.
  • Participants will be able to articulate at least three non-traditional therapeutic practices they can apply to their daily interactions with students.

Burnout in University Counseling Center Clinicians

Presenter(s):

Madison Estrada
Florida State University

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention
  • University Counseling Center Leadership

Abstract: The ability of university counseling centers (UCCs) to meet increased demand for service by students is becoming an increasing concern. While UCCs are seeing more students than ever, this increased demand has not been met with an increase in resources. Consequently, clinicians are at greater risk for developing burnout. According to the Demand – Control – Support Model, this risk could be reduced if staff were afforded higher degrees of control over the resources they do have and received adequate support for their work. This study investigated whether using a Stepped Care model for service delivery is characterized by clinicians with lower degrees of burnout and greater degrees of job satisfaction and organizational commitment through the lens of the Demand – Control – Support model. This study provided support for the Demand – Control – Support Model, as job demands were a significant predictor of burnout and job satisfaction; control was a significant predictor of burnout, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment; and support was a significant predictor of job satisfaction and organizational commitment. This research sheds light on what higher administrators and UCC leadership staff can do to better support the wellbeing of UCC clinicians, decreasing risk of clinician burnout.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe the various demands placed on UCC staff today, and explain how those demands place UCC clinicians at greater risk of burnout.
  • Participants will be able to explain the Demand - Control - Support model and will conceptualize UCC demands through the lens of this model.
  • Participants will be able to list ways in which higher administrators and UCC leadership staff can better support UCC clinicians in order to decrease risk for burnout, and increase job satisfaction and organizational commitment.


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