Founded in 1991 | A division of the American Counseling Association


2024 ACCA Conference Breakout Sessions

Friday, February 23, 2024

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Addressing Racial Trauma in College Students through Self-Compassion

Presenter(s):

Lindsey Donald
Mississippi State University
  

Abstract: Trauma occurs as a result of an event where a person is exposed to or experiences threatened harm or sexual violence (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Racial trauma defined as a response to adverse, cumulative, race-related life experiences (Williams et al., 2018). When people experience racial trauma, they may feel embarrassed, ashamed, and overwhelmed (Ponds, 2013) which promotes tension and trauma reactions (Chioneso et al., 2020). Researchers postulate that experiences with racial discrimination as to why people of color have higher rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (Williams et al., 2018). Self-compassion has been demonstrated in research to assist in alleviate PTSD symptomology through its three components, mindfulness, self-kindness, and common humanity (Wilders et al., 2020). In this presentation, attendees will be equipped with tools on applying self-compassion exercises with college students who have experienced racial trauma.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify at least three ways racial trauma impacts college students
  • Describe self-compassion through its three components
  •  Analyze how self-compassion can be implemented with those who have experienced racial trauma with at least three interventions

Struggling in Silence on Campus: How to Provide Advocacy and Support to Students Struggling with Eating Disorders

Presenter(s):

Tiffany Spisak
Indiana University of Pennsylvania

William Johnson
Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Abstract: Eating disorder behaviors can lead to severe mental, physical, social, and emotional impairment as well as overall negative impacts on wellness and self-esteem levels. There are varying types of eating disorder presentations, and these maladaptive eating patterns look differently in various, diverse individuals (Goel et al., 2021). When working with students in a college setting, it is necessary to show validation, understanding, and empathy while screening for wellness factors such as distressing eating habits. It is also important to consider the diversity amongst students on college campuses and to understand that eating disorders can affect all types of young adults from varying cultures, races, ethnicities, and backgrounds. Eating disorders in university students have been found to be associated with perfectionism, anxiety, and distress symptoms that impact ability to succeed in college (Öztürk et al., 2021). There is a distinct need for collaboration with college counseling centers, staff, and students to raise awareness for eating disorders and provide unconditional support to the students impacted by maladaptive eating habits (Monsour et al., 2022). At this presentation, attendees will gain an understanding of how eating disorders impact a variety of culturally diverse students while discussing methods of incorporating advocacy on college campuses.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will identify the ways in which a variety of maladaptive eating behaviors impact college students.
  • Participants will examine and compare the various diverse populations who struggle with a variety of eating disorder behaviors.
  • Participants will collaborate to discuss how college counseling centers can best address these issues on campus.

Adaptable Development and Integration of the Embedded Counseling Model

Presenter(s):

Luke Strawn
North Carolina State University

Emily Burdo
North Carolina State University

Abstract: In the wake of increased demand for counseling services and mental health support, higher education institutions have shifted to creative and accessible services and models to meet the needs of our students. One such model permanently embeds counselors in high-traffic areas on campus to provide accessible services for our students. Dozens of post-secondary institutions have implemented the Embedded Clinical Model to literally meet the students where they are at, providing and normalizing counseling services. In this presentation we will discuss the concept and implementation of an Embedded Counseling Clinical Model. Presenters will explore:  - The philosophy and context supporting the model's implementation at NC State - Key aspects of the ECCM that may be adapted to any secondary institution. - Optimizing program implementation with limited funds and resources  - Seeking data collection opportunities for reporting student needs for services, ongoing assessment, and evaluation of programming - Interdisciplinary collaboration between counseling staff, faculty, and administration to better understand and address student needs. - Honoring the expectations of various stakeholders while maintaining the structure of the Embedded Counselor Clinical Model

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the key principles and theoretical foundations of the Embedded Counseling Model and its relevance in the context of college campus mental health services.
  • Discuss the specific steps and strategies required to plan and implement an Embedded Counseling Model on a college campus, considering the unique needs and challenges of the institution.
  • Analyze the benefits and potential drawbacks of implementing an Embedded Counseling Model, comparing it to traditional counseling services in terms of accessibility, effectiveness, and student satisfaction.
  • Prepare a comprehensive action plan for integrating an Embedded Counseling Model into a college campus, including the identification of key stakeholders, resource allocation, and a timeline for implementation.
  • Assess and rate the success of an existing Embedded Counseling Model on a college campus through the examination of relevant data and student feedback, and propose strategies for continuous improvement and revision.

Back To In-Person: Clients' and Clinicians' Perspectives on the Transition Back to In-person Group Therapy

Presenter(s):

Erin Morpeth-Provost
Florida State Univeristy

 Abstract: The global COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a massive shift to virtual health services, or telehealth, inclusive of psychological services. As universities moved online, university counseling centers were also forced to shift not only individual therapy services to virtual options, but also group therapy services. While research continues to emerge about the initial transition to online services, university counseling centers have now shifted back to offering primarily in-person services. In the present study, clinicians and student-clients who led or participated in both virtual group therapy between the spring 2020 and spring 2022 semesters and in-person group therapy during the fall 2022 semester completed surveys which included both multiple choice and open-ended questions. This study offers preliminary, descriptive insights into how both university counseling center clinicians and student-clients experienced the transition from virtual group therapy back to in-person therapy, including preferences for modalities and concerns and benefits associated with each modality.

Learning Objectives:

  • List the overall preferences of clinicians and student-clients for virtual or in-person group therapy in UCCs.
  • Describe the most prevalent benefits and concerns identified by UCC clinicians and student-clients with regard to virtual and in-person group therapy.
  • Discuss implications and considerations for future use of virtual or hybrid models of group therapy in UCCs.

Reclaiming Resilience: Affirming Counseling for Transgender Survivors of Sexual Assault

Presenter(s):

Adrienne Graham
University of Georgia

    Abstract: When conceptualizing a client who is a transgender survivor of campus sexual assault, it is important to consider the multiple marginalized identities through an integrated approach to address unique needs as they arise (ACA, 2014; Lewis et al., 2022; Ratts et al., 2015). Counselors must work from an integrative approach for a treatment plan that empowers and collaborates with survivors while addressing sexual assault trauma and other symptoms, marginalization, and navigating college concerns as a student. This presentation will briefly discuss what transgender survivors have expressed about experiences of affirming counseling services after sexual assault victimization. Within this presentation, I will propose strategies to integrate and consider when working with transgender survivors of sexual assault in a college counseling setting.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Attendees will increase awareness and understanding of the unique challenges faced by transgender college student sexual assault survivors
    • Attendees will explore transgender affirming counseling approaches and interventions.
    • Attendees will explore and enhance their cultural competence and self-awareness when working with transgender survivors

    How Therapeutic Assessment Meets Students' Needs within the bounds of a Brief Therapy Model

    Presenter(s):

    Madison Estrada
    Florida State University

    Abstract: University counseling centers (UCCs) continue to serve vast numbers of students amidst significant staff shortages (Gorman & Scofield, 2023). As UCCs are inundated with students, they may see more students seeking specialized psychological assessment. However, traditional psychological testing can be time-consuming, resource-laden, and clinician-demanding. Consequently, within the scope of a brief therapy model, students are likely referred elsewhere for such services. Unfortunately, students then face long waitlists and the financial expense of pursuing testing inconveniently located off-campus. This can result in students not being evaluated in a timely manner to pursue accommodations which could promote academic success. UCCs' ability to offer psychological testing would be of benefit to many students. Yet, traditional testing appears to go against the brief-therapy model and scoff in the face of limited resources. Therapeutic Assessment (TA), however, is an approach that is intended to be a brief intervention, which coincides nicely within a short-term treatment model, can be less time-demanding, and can still meet students' assessment needs (Finn & Martin, 2013; Thomas & Finn, 2022). This presentation will outline how TA can be implemented within UCCs, delving into the TA appointments, and sharing practical tips clinicians can implement (Fantini, Aschieri, & Finn, 2021).

    Learning Objectives:

    • Explain the differences between traditional psychological testing and Therapeutic Assessment.
    • Describe how Therapeutic Assessment can be implemented as a brief-intervention within a short-term therapy model.
    • Outline the typical four to six session progression employed in Therapeutic Assessment.
    • Identify the benefits of Therapeutic Assessment and the types of presenting concerns that Therapeutic Assessment can address.

    Stepping Up: Utilizing the Step Care Model to Expand College Counseling Services

    Presenter(s):

    Samantha Roth
    MICA

    Abstract: In the last five years, demand for counseling services on college campuses has skyrocketed, while counselors who can meet this need have felt increasingly stretched thin and struggling to supply the mental health care many students require. The rise in acuity of mental health needs necessitating more 1:1 services have also contributed to longer and longer waitlists. In order to address these rising pressures and taking inspiration from multiple campuses across the country, small private art school Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA)'s Student Counseling Center (SCC) recently implemented a step care model called PATHs (Positive Actions Towards Health) specifically designed for a population of art students. In this presentation, SCC Director Avetta White, Ph.D, LCPC, and  Associate Director Samantha Roth, LCSW-C,  will walk attendees through how SCC built, advertised, and executed this model successfully on campus in the hopes of assisting others in doing so themselves. By utilizing seven different customized PATHs, SCC has been able to eliminate the need for a waitlist, allow for more preventive care (thus decreasing hospitalizations, students needing a leave of absence, and increasing student retention), and accommodate a variety of student needs beyond traditional 1:1 counseling.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Demonstrate understanding of how step care model can be utilized for college campus use
    • Evaluate best practices in step care model to select practices for college campus use
    • Apply knowledge of step care model to begin to create customized model for college campus use

    Holistic Student Wellness in a Community College Setting – It Can Be Accomplished!

    Presenter(s):

    Arlen Garcia
    Mi

    Lourdes M. Perez
    Higher Education

    Abstract: Student mental health has come to the forefront at many colleges and universities which have found themselves having to prepare their faculty and staff to support students with supplemental needs that they have not had to do in the past. College students today are juggling many challenges that are added to their already-tasked student life (Allin, 2023). Relationships, economic strains, social injustices, mass violence, COVID-19, and adjusting to starting college. In a Health Minds Study, it was noted that in 2020-2021, they found that 60% of college students had indicated that they met one or more mental health problems, which increased by 50% from 2013 (Lipson, 2022). Miami Dade College (MDC) used evidenced-based practices and created a framework to work with a college-wide task force to tackle the prevalent issues facing college students today in regard to their mental and overall well-being ( (JED Foundation & Steve Fund, 2018) ).  Participants will be provided with an overview of the experiences, the process, the hurdles, and how each member of the Task Force contributed overall. Participants will be shown the workflow and the intricate pieces that it took to get to where they are today so that they, too may replicate.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Participants will be able to identify institutional stakeholders and build a flowchart leading to the development of a wellness proposal.
    • Participants will be able to develop and execute an assessment tool designed to assess student needs regarding mental health and wellness initiatives.
    • Utilizing the outcome of the assessment, participants will be able to develop training programs for students, faculty and student facing staff designed to identify students in need as well as referral processes
    • Utilizing the outcome of the assessment, participants will be able to develop institutional supports targeting the mental health and wellness of enrolled students

    1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

    A "Layers of Care" Framework to Promote Mental Health Across the University of North Carolina System

    Presenter(s):

    Kristen Moran
    UNC System Office

    Suzie Baker
    UNC System Office

    Abstract: Contemporary college students find themselves amidst a mental health crisis exacerbated by academic pressures, digital seclusion, financial strains, and prevailing uncertainty. The repercussions of this crisis ripple beyond students, affecting faculty and staff and subsequently influencing classroom dynamics and support roles. These roles, albeit crucial, can precipitate burnout and stress. A multifaceted (comprehensive) approach is necessary to achieve impact on both a diverse set of mental health challenges among a diverse set of individuals. A holistic approach within universities is vital, integrating resources and interventions at various levels. The UNC system will share their comprehensive "Layers of Care" framework based on a social ecological model. This presentation will explore real-world implementation, stakeholder engagement, and scalable strategies for promoting mental well-being across diverse campuses.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Participants will be able to describe the Social Ecological Model (SEM) and its application to promote mental well-being across all students, faculty, and staff in the UNC System.
    • Participants will be able to list how various stakeholders, including administrators, faculty, staff, mental health professionals, and students actively contributed to the plan's design, implementation, and evaluation.
    • Participants will understand and discuss the multi-level mental health interventions sponsored by the UNC System within the "Layers of Care" framework.
    • Participants will discuss and apply information from the session to their own campus through small group discussion, including how to adapt elements of the UNC system's mental well-being plan to their own institutional contexts.

    Breaking the Binary: A Phenomenological Study of Transgender and Gender Diverse Collegiate Athletes

    Presenter(s):

    Myranda Warfield
    University of Florida/Western Carolina University

    Corrine Buchanan
    University of Florida/Tall Grass Therapy LLC

      Abstract: Advocacy and education for greater inclusion of student athletes who identify as transgender and gender diverse has been noted by scholars and athletes. This is especially relevant given the increasing number of anti-trans legislation about the participation and inclusion of transgender and gender diverse athletes at the college level within the United States. In conjunction with ongoing negative and transphobic beliefs about transgender athletes' participation within sports, these students may be facing ongoing challenges and systemic barriers that impact their mental health. Due to the current dearth of literature of transgender and gender diverse collegiate athletes, this qualitative study seeks to address the lived experiences of this population. Four gender diverse college athletes were interviewed and three major themes emerged from the data: being in a binary, exploring the binary, and breaking the binary. Implications for college counselors in education and advocacy and future research are discussed.

      Learning Objectives:

      • Participants will be able to describe the current and historical legislation, beliefs, and systems that impact transgender and gender diverse athletes.
      • Participants will be able to create at least one practical application of knowledge towards their own practices as college counselors and/or advocates based on implications of the research.

      Neurodivergence and Executive Functioning Within the College Population

      Presenter(s):

      Sheri Waddill
      UCF Counseling and Psychological Se
       

      Abstract: Today, more colleges and universities offer some form of neurodiverse support; it is rare to find a college or university that does not. The availability of technology, diagnostics and support programs shows that universities are growing more attuned to the wide-ranging needs of their entire student population. It is of benefit to the neurodiverse student for Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) centers to also offer informed support. Statistics show 80% of the neurodivergent population do not finish their undergraduate degree. Neurodiversity is frequently under or unrecognized, undertreated and/or given treatments for other diagnoses. This presentation will help therapists develop a better comprehensive assessment of the characteristics and symptoms of the neurodivergent student, including the different presentations among genders, and learn about co-occurring disorders to be able to discern between diagnoses.

      Learning Objectives:

      • This presentation will help therapists develop a better comprehensive assessment of the characteristics and symptoms of the neurodivergent student.
      • Understand how the differing neurodiverse presentations differs between genders and how this effects diagnosis.
      • Understand neurodiverse co-occurring disorders to be able to discern between diagnoses.

      Mindfulness Programming on Campus: Simple Implementation for Big Results!

      Presenter(s):

      Katherine Stefanelli
      University of Scranton

      Mary Troy
      University of Scranton

        Abstract: Description: College counseling centers are providing more clinical services than ever before, as students flock in record numbers for mental health support.  With more students entering college than ever, the breadth and depth of clinical presentations and concerns are ever present.  Often taxed and overwhelmed by the sheer volume of individual sessions necessitated, clinicians may benefit from implementing proactive wellness programming in their centers to help alleviate contributing factors such as stress before symptoms reach critical mass.  The session will help attendees understand the evidence-based strategies which can assist in preventative wellness efforts. Attendees will participate in a hands-on demonstration of mindfulness techniques.  Content: Presenters will discuss research on the role of stress and intersecting factors which currently contribute to the rise in mental health presentations on college campuses in recent years. Attendees will learn about current statistics involving presenting concerns and ideas for mitigating stress, a major contributor in the onset and exacerbation of many mental health symptoms. The presenters will use demonstration, experiential learning, and lecture to teach mindfulness techniques such as guided imagery and mini meditations to mediate the stress response.  Such techniques can be implemented with minimal cost, where implications for retention and graduation are profound

        Learning Objectives:

        • Attendees will learn how the stress response acts as a contributing factor in college students' mental health concerns and the role this response plays in the rising demand for services at college counseling centers.
        • Attendees will learn the benefits of proactive stress management programming for the reduction of perceived chronic stress, with implications for comprehensive mental health treatment.
        • Attendees will learn practical ways to implement mind-body techniques as part of preventative programming for college campuses.

        Not about me without me: Advocating on campus with/for students with a disability

        Presenter(s):

        Gregory Bohner
        Lindsey Wilson College

        Patricia Stewart-Hopkins
        Lindsey Wilson College

        Olivia Carter
        Lindsey Wilson College
           

        Abstract: Because of the various intersections of identity for college students, there are many marginalized groups that can benefit from advocacy efforts from the counseling center. One such group is students with disabilities. During the Civil Rights Movement, the phrase "Not about us without us" was a rally cry for those from disability groups. In this presentation, the ACA Advocacy Competency Domains will be applied to the higher education setting with discussions of how to use these domains to create an action plan for advocating alongside students with disabilities.

        Learning Objectives:

        • Participants will apply the ACA Advocacy Competency Domains to the work at their institution.
        • Participants will be able to collaborate with students to enact meaningful change.
        • Participants will be able to identify key collaborators on campus.
        • Participants will be able to create an advocacy plan across different domains for students with disabilities.

        Florida University Counseling Center Clinicians' Perceptions on Meeting Demands: Moderating variables in the relationship between increased demands and burnout

        Presenter(s):

        Madison Estrada
        Florida State University
           

        Abstract: University counseling centers (UCCs) nationwide have faced increased demands for well over a decade (Field, 2022). As UCC clinicians strive to meet the volume of students, they are discovering that increased demands also encompass increased complexity of psychopathology, suicidality, and mental health treatment before entering college (Abrams, 2020; Xiao et al., 2017). In addition to increased demands, UCCs have experienced increased turnover rates in recent years (Field, 2022). As clinicians choose to leave their UCCs, turnover inevitably takes a negative toll on the students and university as a whole. Florida UCCs are not exempt from these nationwide challenges: increased demand for services, and in many cases, decreased resources, including staff shortages. In fact, given the current sociopolitical climate within Florida, there is possibly even greater tension present on Florida university campuses (South Florida Sun Sentinel, 2022). Therefore, this study specifically investigated Florida UCC clinicians in order to shed light on their perceptions and work experiences pertaining to burnout, job satisfaction, and stress amidst the increased demands and the sociopolitical climate. The following variables were analyzed as potential moderators between demands and burnout, job satisfaction, and stress: distress tolerance, perceived fit, organizational support, co-worker support, and autonomy within one's work role.

        Learning Objectives:

        • Summarize the current climate of FL UCCs, specifically listing how FL UCC clinicians are being impacted by the increased demands for services.
        • Recognize variables which can moderate the relationships between increase demands and burnout, job satisfaction, and stress.
        • Discuss steps that can be taken or changes that can be enacted at UCCs to reduce the risk for clinician burnout.

        Creating a Trainee Wellbeing Program: A Peer Mentorship Model

        Presenter(s):

        Foujan Kafri
        University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Counseling and Mental Health

        Jessica Beale
        University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Counseling and Mental Health (CMH)

        Ferdinand Aliga
        University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Counseling and Mental Health (CMH)

        Abstract: Training is an integral part of college counseling centers. Demands of clinical training along with additional stressors can lead to psychological distress among mental health trainees. When mental health trainees are able to feel seen and heard, they can then provide effective treatment to the populations they meet with. This presentation will describe our Peer Mentorship Model, a three transitional phase program led by Postdoctoral and Postgraduate Fellows for all trainees including Psychology Interns, Practicum Trainees, and Social Work Interns. The program breaks the training year into three key transitional phases, including integration into the college counseling center setting, application for future training opportunities, and professional development. The Peer Mentorship Model allows for personal and professional growth among all mental health clinicians. Presenters will review implementation of this program at their college counseling center within the last three years, successive outcomes and program limitations.

        Learning Objectives:

        • Describe the three transitional phases of the Peer Mentorship Model.
        • Identify three ways in which the peer mentorship program enhances trainees learning experience.
        • Outline the benefits of a peer mentor- mentee relationship.

        Shifting from the Crisis Narrative

        Presenter(s):

        David Walden
        Hamilton College

        Gary Glass
        Oxford College of Emory University

        Abstract: Over the last two decades, the "crisis narrative" of college student mental health has gradually taken hold as the dominant conceptual framework. It defines the problem, shapes our student/faculty experiences, motivates institutional reactions and choices, and has led to constantly shifting sands of challenge and mirage. This program will critically examine the "crisis narrative" of mental health and panelists will discuss how it has impacted their mental health efforts. Next steps and takeaways will be discussed.

        Learning Objectives:

        • Participants will articulate the core ingredients of the crisis narrative of mental health and explain the why the crisis narrative has evolved over 20 years.
        • Participants will be able to discuss examples of how the crisis narrative impedes successful mental health efforts.
        • Participants will be able to list and explain alternatives to the crisis narrative including local actions that can be taken.

        3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

        Immigrant Student's Wellbeing: Advocacy Strategies for Counselors and Counselor Educators

        Presenter(s):

        Rumbidzai Mushunje
        The Ohio State University

        Abstract: There has been an increase in the number of international students on campuses, with an estimated 710, 210 international students who were pursing higher education in the 2020-2021 academic school year (Stewart-Rozema & Pratts, 2023). Diem and Welton (2020) note the importance of educational leaders to understand the influence of systems such as racism in daily practice. In education, theoretical frameworks that advance equitable systems such as the translational racial equity research practice (TRERP) are needed (Johnson et al, 2022). Counselors and Counselor Educators are strategically positioned to be social change agents tasked to advocate on behalf of students who are disenfranchised by institutional barriers. The lack of competency for counselors to broach racial/cultural issues can decrease student satisfaction and induce premature termination of counseling services (Day‐Vines et al., 2007). Thus, this session discusses how counselor educators can better support immigrant students who have experienced or is experiencing racism in university settings. Educators will recognize help-seeking behaviors of immigrant students and impact of larger systems on student's behaviors. The presenter will highlight challenges faced by immigrant students and discuss evidenced based interventions and strategies to support immigrant students including anti-racist frameworks.

        Learning Objectives:

        • Attendees will understand prior research highlighting the challenges faced by immigrant students and impact of racism on student's wellness and wellbeing.
        • Attendees will detail evidenced based interventions to meet the needs of immigrant students through an antiracist framework.
        • Attendees will assess their own multicultural and advocacy practice to better support immigrant students in university settings.

        The ABCs of S.E.X. on a College Campus: Addressing Basic (mis)Conceptions of Sexuality to Effectively Treat Young Adults

        Presenter(s):

        Norma Ngo
        University of Houston

        Abstract: The ABCs of S.E.X. on a College Campus: Addressing Basic (mis)Conceptions of Sexuality to effectively treat young adults. This session will clarify common sexual myths, provide an overview of sexually-related concerns on the college campus, and introduce a sex-positive framework for assessing and managing a patient's sexual concerns. This session will hopefully stimulate your desire for knowledge, satisfy your needs for education in this area, and hook you up with resources for further learning.

        Learning Objectives:

        • Participants will be able to describe common sexual myths and apply sex-positive information in their work with clients.
        • Participants will examine the range of sexual concerns of college students and be able to assess these in their home campus.
        • Participants will be able to adopt an introductory application of the P-LI-SS-IT model to treat sexual concerns within a short-term model and assess what might require more extensive treatment.

        Social Determinants of Mental health: Outcomes From Assessing and Addressing The First Layer of Diversity

        Presenter(s):

        Kaprea Johnson
        The Ohio State University

        Lauren Robins
        Old Dominion University

        Krystal Clemons
        Denver Seminary
         

        Abstract: The social determinants of mental health (SDOMH) are non-medical factors, such as discrimination, social support, economic instability, and food insecurity, that are responsible for physical and mental health inequities amongst the population nationally and globally.  The SDOMH are directly impacted by the unequal distribution of resources, power, money, and laws, making this a social justice issue that counselors and higher education institutions are likely to face and that they can address. College students are a vulnerable population in terms of SDOMH because of college student stressors (i.e., finances, support system, wellness, safety, etc..) that are exacerbated if SDOMH needs are not addressed. This presentation will discuss the following: 1)  Best practices in assessment of SDOMH needs with college students, highlighting results from our published journal article that describes our development and outcomes of the first SDOMH college student assessment tool; 2) SDOMH outcome research with college students, specifically discussing two of our research papers that found a strong relationship between unmet SDOMH needs and anxiety and depression; and 3) How college counselors and universities can use interprofessional collaboration, advocacy, and community engagement to address college student unmet SDOMH needs; utilizing results from a research study, systematic review, and practical experience.

        Learning Objectives:

        • As a result of the presentation colleagues will be able to: List the key SDOMH factors that contribute to increases in anxiety and depression in college students.
        • As a result of the presentation colleagues will be able to: Utilize college student specific and general SDOMH/SDOH assessment tools in universal assessment and individual assessment strategies.
        • As a result of the presentation colleagues will be able to: Prepare a comprehensive plan for tackling unmet SDOMH needs among their college student population, incorporating elements of best practices when engaging in interprofessional collaboration, advo
        • As a result of the presentation colleagues will be able to: Use data from their own universities to assess and address unmet SDOMH needs of their college student population.
        • As a result of the presentation colleagues will be able to: Demonstrate with data and Discuss with examples how  SDOMH is the first layer of diversity, and must be addressed to ensure equity and inclusivity to support college student academic and mental w

        Incorporating topics of identity development, social determinants of health, and vulnerability into collegiate crisis counseling safety planning

        Presenter(s):

        Lindsay Lundeen
        University of Arkansas

        Abstract: As suicide is the second largest cause of death among individuals between the ages of 10 and 24 (CDC, 2023), suicide risk assessment and safety planning are vital skills of collegiate counseling. However, suicide impacts individuals of varying backgrounds differently. The CDC (2023) noted individuals identifying as Lesbian, Gay, or Bisexual, non-Hispanic American Indian and Alaska Natives and non-Hispanic Black individuals, individuals with disabilities, working in industry, or living in a rural area are at an increased risk for suicide due to various social determinants of health.   All counselors receive suicide prevention training, yet one study noted that 70% of their sample yearned for additional training (Moscardini et al., 2020). Furthermore, literature on crisis counseling does not provide recommendations for collegiate crisis counselors, who often counsel individuals in varying crises. This presentation will cover basics of suicide risk assessment and safety planning and provide inclusivity practices and strategies for use with individuals of special populations. Additionally, the presenter will provide practical application pieces specific to collegiate crisis counseling and how social determinants of health might impact individuals at various age ranges enduring assorted crises. Lastly, the presenter will provide empirically supported suicide assessments discussed within counseling research, offering practice opportunities.

        Learning Objectives:

        • Attendees will be able to describe types of suicidal ideation in keeping with multiple theoretical frameworks for suicide. Attendees also will understand the differing types of crises faced by collegiate students.
        • Attendees will become familiar with the impact of social determinants of health and how suicide can impact individuals of special and vulnerable collegiate populations at different rates.
        • Attendees will practice identifying risk factors for suicide, utilizing brief suicide risk assessments, and incorporating population-specific aspects into safety plans.
        • Attendees will be able to communicate topics to supervisees and others in their counseling practice to spread knowledge on the impacts of identity development and social determinants of health on college students in crisis.

        Meeting on Their Turf: The Ethical Use of Social Media in Campus Outreach

        Presenter(s):

        Aaron Geringer
        Gustavus Adolphus College

        Abstract: In the ever-changing landscape of higher education, college counseling centers are striving to meet students 'where they are at' in innovative ways. While discussions often revolve around physical spaces on campus, the importance of digital spaces cannot be ignored. For better or worse, many of our Gen Z students are deeply integrated into the world of social media. They often look to 'influencers' on these platforms for information and to shape their opinions on real-world issues (Hynes & Kingzette, 2022). As of March 2022, the hashtag #mentalhealth had been viewed more than 29 billion times on TikTok (Phillips, 2022). Given that a significant portion of our students are already active on social media, college counselors can harness this opportunity to connect with their campus community by (1) sharing insights on college student mental health, (2) providing wellbeing tips, and (3) offering information about their services. During this session, participants will gain insights into the ethical considerations of using social media for outreach, learn how to create a social media policy for their department, and receive tips for optimizing their social media presence to enhance outreach efforts.

        Learning Objectives:

        • Attendees will be able to describe three ethical considerations when using social media for department outreach.
        • Attendees will describe three essential components for a department social media policy.
        • Attendees will be able to recite three tips to optimize their social media outreach.

        Student-Athlete Mental Health: Reducing the Mental Health Stigma Among Black Male College Student-Athletes Through Innovative Collaborations and Initiatives to Promote Help-Seeking Behavior.

        Presenter(s):

        Letitia Minor
        Coastal Carolina University

          Abstract: The NCAA has recently renewed its focus on supporting student-athlete mental health through the creation of the Mental Health Advisory Group and the Division I Transformation Committee. Institutions will be required to offer accessible resources for student-athletes to access full-time clinical services of licensed mental health professionals. These updates shared at the 2023 NCAA Convention could have a remarkable impact on help-seeking behavior among Black male student-athletes as the most recent NCAA Student-Athlete Well-Being Study results reported that fewer than half (42%) of Black male student-athletes felt they would be comfortable seeking personal support from a mental health provider on campus (NCAA Research, 2022). The presenter will provide an overview of the recommended updates for best practices and programming from the Mental Health Advisory Group and Division I Transformation Committee. The presenter will seek to identify barriers that continue to contribute to the mental health stigma among Black male student-athletes. Lastly, the presenter will share mental health and wellness initiatives, collaborations, and resources on campus to promote help-seeking behavior and reduce the mental health stigma among Black male student-athletes.

          Learning Objectives:

          • Participants will be able to define and articulate the best practices and programming recommendations from the Mental Health Advisory Group and Division I Transformative Committee.
          • Participants will be able to identify at least three barriers that contribute to the mental health stigma among Black male student-athletes and examine ways they can advocate for Black male student-athletes on their respective campuses.
          • Participants will be able to identify and articulate at least three mental health and wellness initiatives, collaborations, and resources to promote help-seeking behavior among Black male student-athletes on their respective campuses.
          HEMHA Presentation

          Presenter(s):

          Chris Corbett
          University of Kansas

          Abstract:

          Learning Objectives:

          Using Evidence-Based Approaches and Innovative Outreach Practices to Support the Mental Health Care Needs of Student-Athletes and Improve Access to Care

          Presenter(s):

          Kelli lasseter
          University of Alabama at Birmingham

            Abstract: The changing landscape of college athletics puts student-athletes at greater risk of mental health-related issues. Rigorous schedules, limited time for self-care, and pressures related to performance are just a few of the factors that increase the likelihood of mental health-relates issues. This session will provide attendees information on evidence-based interventions and appointment models that are most effective when providing services for student-athletes and improving access to care.    This session will also present evidence-based outreach strategies and programming designed specifically for student-athletes. It will also explore how student-athletes can be involved at various levels of implementation of these services. At UAB, we have experienced an increase in utilization due in part to the participation of student athletes at all levels of outreach and program planning.    Finally, this session will explore the importance of having a designated Liaison from the counseling center to the athletic department. The presenter will share her experience as Liaison and "lessons learned" over the course of the past 8 years in this role. She will also share tips to engage administrative staff, coaches, athletic trainers, and athletes to increase awareness and access to services.

            Learning Objectives:

            • This session's primary objective will provide attendees with interventions (including crisis response) and appointment models that are most effective when supporting the mental health needs of student-athletes.
            • This session will provide attendees information on how to engage student-athletes through outreach and programming that are sports-specific.
            • This session will present evidence to support the need for a Liaison role dedicated to the athletics department.
            • Attendees will be actively engaged in this session through small and large group discussions.

            Saturday, February 24, 2024

            10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

            LPCC Girl in a STEM World: Tales of Practicing HSI Servingness

            Presenter(s):

            Molly Becker
            Colorado State University Pueblo

            Abstract: What happens when an LPCC/higher ed case manager is dropped in the center of CSU Pueblo's largest Title III Grant, Part F Department of Education HSI STEM program? Explore the awesome possibilities when creative across-campus collaboration meets grant funding, and the willingness to challenge the status quo! The pursuit of higher education tasks students by engaging them in rigorous academic exploration and courageous personal development. Navigating this environment is uniquely impactful on students belonging to STEM disciplines. By physically meeting STEM students where they're at, our impassioned task is to support low-income, first generation, Latinx, and historically underrepresented minority student populations in high-impact programming to increase their academic success. This work includes supporting undergraduate students through paid research opportunities, internship programs, professional development, tutoring support, and other programs and resources. This work also includes holistic student support. As such, The MAPS Center for STEM Support was proudly created to directly address the mental health/wellness concerns of STEM students and advance justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion (JEDI) efforts in the STEM College. Join this session to learn more about the MAPS Center's tales to de-stigmatize the STEM College, and efforts to enact authentic HSI Servingness.

            Learning Objectives:

            • Describe Servingness within Hispanic Serving Institutes (HSIs).
            • Explain how the MAPS Center for STEM Support enacts Servingness through de-stigmatization and intrusive inclusiveness within the CSU Pueblo STEM College.
            • Consider innovative and collaborative approaches to incorporating HSI Title II  & IV funding into student support needs on your campus.

            Fewer Than Six Degrees of Separation: Ethical Practice in Small College Settings

            Presenter(s):

            Bethany Garr
            Converse University

            Abstract: Counselors providing mental health services at small colleges and universities face unique ethical challenges that may be less common on larger campuses, including dual relationships, client confidentiality, competency issues, and clinician privacy. These ethical dilemmas can be amplified when clinicians or directors are asked to take on additional roles, such as teaching courses, advising student organizations, or managing student workers. This presentation will focus on helping clinicians to recognize potential ethical issues before they arise, identify ways to prevent potential ethical dilemmas, and effectively address ethical challenges when they arise.

            Learning Objectives:

            • Participants will be able to recognize and describe ethical challenges they may encounter when providing counseling in a small college setting.
            • Participants will identify and apply relevant ethical standards to better understand and navigate ethical challenges.
            • Participants will be able to utilize a decision-making model when facing ethical dilemmas in their clinical work on small college campuses.

            The Relationship Between Differentiation of Self and College Counselor Burnout

            Presenter(s):

            Ken Messina
            Slippery Rock University

            John Mathe
            Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania

            Molly Mistretta
            Slippery Rock University

            Megan Gallo
            Slippery Rock University

            Emily Grimes
            Slippery Rock University

            Abstract: The post-pandemic era in higher education has led to an increased demand for services from college counseling centers to address increasing mental health concerns of students at a time when resources are becoming scarcer. As college student mental health demands have increased, so have the pressures, demands, and caseloads of college counselors. This has resulted in many college counselors leaving the field at a time when their services are needed most. This presentation reviews the mixed method study conducted by the presenters examining the relationship between burnout and differentiation of self among college counselors and college counselors experience with burnout during a time when the demand for campus counseling services is at an all-time high. This presentation provides insight into the experience of college counselors to better identify ways to prevent and recover from burnout in this population. Potential methods for college counselors, counseling center directors, and institutions of higher education for prevention and recovery from burnout derived from the conclusions of this study will be discussed.

            Learning Objectives:

            • Participants will be able to describe the relationship between level of differentiation of self and burnout among college counselors.
            • Participants will be able to discuss common themes to college counselor experiences of burnout.
            • Participants will be able to apply the information gained from this session to develop methods for preventing and reducing burnout among college counselors.

            #MoreThanACounselor: Re-Examining the Traditional Role of College Counselors

            Presenter(s):

            Melissa McKenna
            Washington University in St. Louis

            Lilliesha Grandberry
            University of North Texas

            Abstract: To stay relevant, we as college counselors need to adapt to the ever-changing student populations that we serve. This community-based counseling model focuses on meeting students where they are, to increase access while reducing barriers to treatment and support. Often, students will disclose to a peer, online community, or family member that they are struggling with their mental health before seeking out traditional treatment options or support. This model aims to increase access in inclusive spaces on campus where these conversations are organically occurring; emphasizing collaboration with campus partners to create a relationship network of support for students. Recognizing that students consistently report barriers to treatment including stigma and access, with diverse students being disproportionately impacted; this model directly addresses those challenges and provides participants with strategies for implementation on their campuses.

            Learning Objectives:

            • Participants will be able to identify two barriers and benefits to a community-based counseling model on their home campus.
            • Participants will be able to develop a minimum of two ideas for targeted programming and outreach activities to bring to their respective campus.

            Mindfulness: A Potential Key to Responding Common College Student Concerns with Motivation, Procrastination & Self-Efficacy

            Presenter(s):

            Jessica Maga
            Seton Hill University

            Abstract: Emerging adulthood is a time of significant transition and the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated this time of instability for many individuals. College students are increasingly seeking counseling services for heightened anxiety, depleted motivation, and increased academic distress and procrastination. It is essential for universities to identify effective prevention and intervention programs to support students with these concerns. This presentation will review a recent study exploring relationships between mindfulness, motivation, self-efficacy, procrastination, and academic outcomes. It will also review previous studies supporting the research findings. Implications address the potential benefits of group-based mindfulness interventions for college students to not further overwhelm Counseling Centers.

            Learning Objectives:

            • Learners will describe the trends in student needs as they come to College Counseling Centers.
            • Learners will recite Self-Determination Theory's three psychological needs and impact on autonomous motivation.
            • Learners will explain the connection between mindfulness and common college student concerns such as motivation, procrastination, and self-efficacy.
            • Learners will discuss potential interventions that can be provided on college campuses.

            Community College Data Driven Advocacy and Support

            Presenter(s):

            Amanda Allen
            Wake Technical Community College

            Amy Hayes Siler
            Community College of Allegheny County

            Abstract: Data-driven decision making (DDDM) focuses on systematic collection and statistical analysis of data to inform practice and policies (Mandinach, 2012). DDDM is becoming a field of interest with the expectation that community college leaders make evidenced-based decisions aimed at improving student success (DeJear et al. 2018). Leveraging knowledge and data are tools one can use to self-advocate leading to increased job satisfaction and self-efficacy (Cornelius et al., 2021).   Historically, community colleges have operated differently than their four-year counterparts. Counselors address mental health needs through personal counseling alongside many other duties (Edwards, 2015). Fewer counselors are tasked with meeting the rising needs of increasing numbers of students (Eisenberg et al., 2016). To further explore the unique needs of community college counselors and provide a lens from which they can advocate, the American College Counseling Association (ACCA) re-instituted its sixth national survey in 2023.   This session will review the 2023 ACCA Community College Survey results. Participants will share feedback for any revisions to the 2024 survey. Using data from the survey, participants will identify ways they can advocate for themselves and the needs of their students at their institutions. Participants will share best practices, current challenges, and what is needed moving further.

            Learning Objectives:

            • Participants will recognize the trends of community college counseling centers and services in reviewing the 2023 ACCA Community College Survey.
            • Participants will recognize data-driven decision making (DDDM) and how it can inform practice.
            • Participants will identify ways to advocate for meeting mental health needs of their students using data.
            • Participants will apply best practices of meeting mental health needs of community college students to their own work.
            • Participants will evaluate ways to overcome challenges of working with students at their institutions.

            Integrating Wellness and Well-Being for Non-Traditional Doctoral Students: A discussion about the challenges that age, familial responsibilities and prolonged absence from formal education presented and the impact on self-care for three mature doctoral st

            Presenter(s):

            Vivian Burrell
            Wayne State University, Detroit, MI

            Denise Hawkins
            Argosy University

            Deborah Smith
            Wheaton College

            Abstract: The American Counselor Association Code of Ethics states, "Counselors must engage in self-care activities to maintain and promote their emotional, physical, mental, and spiritual well-being to best meet their professional responsibilities (ACA, 2014). Personal wellness is integral and significant to counselors' functionality. Programs that train counselors are responsible for understanding the emotional health of ALL students (Pierce & Herlihy, 2013).   As three doctoral students over 50 who share intersecting identities (e.g., wife, mother), our postgraduate experiences brought unique challenges to our overall well-being, such as factors that created difficulties assimilating into the student community and feeling a sense of belonging. While fostering resilience, reliance on external support networks highlights the unique balancing act that mature students undertake between academic pursuits and personal commitments (Gregersen & Nielsen, 2023).    Our goal is to offer practical ways to integrate the wellness of mature students in the community and campus-wide mental health initiatives by delving into the complexities associated with navigating multiple identities in an educational environment that often privileges a more traditional student prototype (Gregersen & Nielsen, 2023).   This presentation will illuminate prevalent issues inhibiting mature students' overall wellness and academic performance (e.g., imposter syndrome, cultural assimilation struggles, and the fear of judgment).

            Learning Objectives:

            • Attendees will be able to describe effective strategies to access support from higher education institutions and leverage community resources that enhance their academic pursuits.
            • Attendees will be able to explain the psychological and social barriers mature students encounter in their efforts to assimilate into the culture of college and universities, including the manifestation of imposter syndrome, the fear of judgment from peer
            • Attendees will be able to discuss the significant impact of institutional norms and expectations in shaping mature students' academic engagement and overall experiences.

            "Don't just SIT there, Say something!": Navigating our roles on SIT/BIT teams

            Presenter(s):

            James Hagenbaugh
            James Hagenbaugh, Psy.D.
             

            Abstract: This presentation will review the various factors that increase violence and stabilizing factors that decrease the likelihood that a student may be violent. Additionally, this presentation will help clinicians determine a student's level of risk and highlight management strategies they can implement. Finally, the presentation will give an overview of the various types of violence that can occur on a college campus.

            Learning Objectives:

            • Participants will be able to describe factors that increase the risk of violence and stabilizing factors that decrease the likelihood of violence.
            • Participants will be able to list management strategies they can implement based on a student's level of risk.
            • Participants will be able to discuss the various steps in a threat assessment


              1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

              Mental Health Risk or Protective Factor? Navigating Impacts of Online Gaming with Collegiate Clients

              Presenter(s):

              Lindsay Lundeen
              University of Arkansas

              Abstract: As technology advances, the way we, as counselors, evaluate mental health concerns should evolve. But what should counselors do when they hear clients engage in online gaming? With new information about internet gaming disorder and internet technology addiction increasing throughout counseling research, a level of concern regarding gaming engagement emerges. Research aside, individuals engaging in gaming report positive aspects of engagement in online gaming. This presentation will address the positive and negative aspects of online gaming research to ensure collegiate counselors can approach topics holistically and with an individualistic approach specific to each client.  This presentation will provide resources for collegiate counselors to provide to clients, such as 12-step meetings, information on the neurobiology of behavioral/process addictions,  Emphasis will be placed on risk and protective factors for Internet Gaming Disorder, Online Gaming Addiction, and Internet Technology Addiction, with empirically supported assessments to determine whether a client's use of online gaming could be considered "problematic" while examining the client's reasons for gaming. This presentation also will provide sample discussion topics and risk factors associated with internet gaming disorder. Lastly, the presenter will provide space to discuss how online gaming and internet use can impact individuals of varying special and vulnerable populations.

              Learning Objectives:

              • Attendees will be able to describe risk factors for Internet gaming disorder and internet technology addiction regarding diagnostic criteria and World Health Organization categorization.
              • Attendees will be able to determine which assessments might apply to their clients' gaming or internet usage and effectively apply assessments to initiate a conversation about risk and protective factors for mental health.
              • Attendees will be able to discuss social determinants of health regarding individuals of special and vulnerable populations and utilize said knowledge to integrate and provide inclusive therapeutic intervention.


              Are you caring for your bigger bodied clients effectively?

              Presenter(s):

              Stacy Blankenship
              NCSU

              Zacchaeus Martin
              North Carolina State University

              Juanita Bobo
              North Carolina State University

              Abstract: As clinicians we have been working hard to combat hidden biases and stigma that impact clients, but how often do we consider body size to be a factor in how we interact with clientele? Yet, studies show that fat phobia has a huge impact on how we interact, diagnose and treat clients in the therapy room. In this training we will look at the history of anti-fat stigma in western culture as a whole before diving in to the ways that it shows up in clinical treatment. We will then address how to work on unlearning harmful assumptions to better serve people in larger bodies and advocacy work we can start doing now. We will end the training with some information about how to better interact when weight is a part of treatment for people of all sizes.

              Learning Objectives:

              • Define and understand fatphobia
              • Learn how fatphobia shows up and impacts our clients
              • Learn how to become an ally and advocate for all body types in the therapeutic setting

              LGBTGEQIAP+: We've come a long way but still have a distance to go!

              Presenter(s):

              Regina Beach
              Tennessee Tech University

              Lara Strate
              Tennessee Tech University

              Abstract: The LGBTGEQIAP+ community has come a long way in the world and in society since the 1900s, but where does that leave our students who find themselves in a world where they have the possibility of showing a side that no one has ever seen? How do we help these students feel comfortable with themselves so they might explore who they are as independent young adults who might be a part of such a small minority community? What do all the letters included in the acronym mean? In this presentation, we will explore the past oppression in their community, what it looks like today, and the support that is still needed for its members. This presentation will include the latest research on the LGBTGEQIAP+ community as well as suggestions for how to best support the community on a college campus. Due to the oppression young adults face, there is an increase in the risk of loneliness, isolation, dropping out of college, substance abuse, and suicidality.

              Learning Objectives:

              • What do the letters of LGBTGEQIAP+ stand for?
              • What did the oppression of the LGBTGEQIAP+ community look like and what are the risk factors associated with this community.
              • How can you best support our young adults who are of the LGBTGEQIAP+ community.

              Trauma-Informed Supervision Within College Counseling Settings

              Presenter(s):

              Adrienne Graham
              University of Georgia

              Abstract: This proposal aligns with each of the five core principles of Counselor Education and Supervision of (a) counseling, (b) supervision, (c) teaching, (d) research/scholarship, and (e) leadership/advocacy and effective supervision as outlined by the American Counseling Association Code of Ethics (2014). Counselors will work with survivors of trauma, therefore must be informed of trauma informed care via trauma informed supervision practices as many counseling programs do not discuss TIS in depth unless there is an elective course offered. More specifically, counselor educators and supervisors must be informed of TIS to promote counselor growth and client welfare. More specifically, college counseling centers and agencies working with primarily college students will work with students who have experienced trauma. Vicarious trauma and burnout are risks to counselors' grown and wellbeing, therefore must be addressed in counseling supervision. Counselor educators should be knowledgeable and engage in ongoing learning to teach counselors how to effectively counsel and advocate with their clients. Supervisors must be knowledgeable of TIS practices to promote inclusivity, social justice, and multicultural practices.

              Learning Objectives:

              • Attendees will develop an understanding of Trauma-Informed Supervision including what it is and applying it into a college counseling setting.
              • Attendees will discuss the need for Trauma-Informed Supervision in collegiate settings and considerations with supervisees working with students presenting with trauma.
              • Attendees will share strategies and analyze a case example for supervisors to integrate Trauma-Informed Supervision techniques in their own supervision.

              Gun Violence at HBCUs: How Does Counseling Services Respond?

              Presenter(s):

              Mark Bolden
              Bowie State University

              Marja Humphrey
              Bowie State University

              Otis Williams
              Bowie State University

              Janelle Cox
              Bowie State University

              Ky'Shaun Bradford
              Bowie State University

              Carolyn Thorpe
              Bowie State University

              Billie Shabazz
              Bowie State University


              Abstract: Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) account for one quarter of social, educational, political, and leadership training experiences for Black diasporic and African American higher education graduates. Recently, HBCU campuses have experienced violent threats and incidents. In the 2022-2023 academic year, several HBCUs received bomb threats, while in the 2023 Homecoming season, two mid-Atlantic HBCUs experienced gun violence on campus. While bomb threats can be a traumatic reminder of historic attacks on other Black institutions, (e.g., churches), the origins of gun violence on HBCUs first occurred  during the Civil Rights period in the late 1960s through state based terror (national guard and police force). Currently, the gun violence on the HBCU campuses is intra-communal. This presentation explores the impact of gun violence on HBCU campuses examining the counseling services' response along several lines including: impacts on staffing and capacity; preparedness for gun violence and mass shootings; the institutional placement of counseling services, burnout among college counselors, and students' narratives of gun violence. Since campus mass shootings have emerged as a feature of the 21st century, the mental health toll highlights the challenges for counseling centers to restore wellness on campus.

              Learning Objectives:

              • Attendees will differentiate how the different eras of gun violence elicit different responses from HBCU students and institutions
              • Attendees will consider the impact to students' mental health when violence erupts on campuses
              • Attendees will show solidarity by offering support and recommendations based on their own counseling services responses to gun violence

              Kink in the Academy

              Presenter(s):

              Ray White
              Walters State Community College

              Abstract: Depending upon the historical, socio-political, cultural, or religious contexts, human sexuality can be viewed as either perverse or diverse. There is no consensus on a standard of what is normal versus abnormal sexual expression, or what should or should not be included in sexuality education (Ponzetti Jr., 2015).   The question of what is normal versus abnormal sexual expression is one that counselors in higher education will no doubt have to consider as they encounter students/clients who identify as BDSM (Bondage/Discipline, Domination/Submission, Sadism/Masochism) practitioners. And such encounters may be quite frequent, as the research suggests approximately 60% of college age students either have experience or interest in BDSM. Yet most counselors will find themselves at a loss as how to assist this type clientele due to a lack of familiarity and/or training on the subject.  This workshop intends to equip and empower counselors by providing a basic knowledge base of the BDSM community and practice. The workshop will explore BDSM proclivity among college students, issues of counselor competence in working with members of the community, and some of the psychology behind BDSM practice.

              Learning Objectives:

              • Attendees will be able to explain the basic tenets of BDSM participation.
              • Attendees will be able to discuss potential psychological benefits of BDSM participation.

              Re-Centering the Center: Re-Imagining the Role of Counseling Centers in Guiding Higher Education

              Presenter(s):

              Gary Glass
              Oxford College of Emory University
               

              Abstract: The post-pandemic landscape of college counseling centers dramatically different than just a few years ago, including increase reliance on outside vendors and reorganizations of mental health services.  In many ways, this is a very vulnerable time for counseling centers.  This program will introduce a narrative and strategy for leading with an integration of clinical services and innovative outreach, to help re-establish the importance of counseling centers, not only for campus mental health but also for higher education, in general.   A vision of counseling centers will be offered, and examples of materials and frameworks will be offered to provide outreach directors with guidance on how to lead their centers and their campuses in the coming years by asserting specific roles and functions of counseling center work and help to define the value of centers on college campuses.

              Learning Objectives:

              • Participants will name specific functions and goals of counseling centers that they can articulate to colleagues in their centers and apply on their campus.
              • Participants will be able to identify 2 institutional priorities that can be informed or influenced by counseling center activities, with examples of how these align with those priorities.

              Having the hard conversation: Talking about multiculturalism with and from the majority

              Presenter(s):

              Gregory Bohner
              Lindsey Wilson College

              Miran McClendon
              Lindsey Wilson College

              Senai King
              Lindsey Wilson College

              Junwei Jia
              Northern State University
               

              Abstract: What happens when multicultural topics are addressed with your supervisees who hold multiple majority identities? Do they stay silent? Do you get the sense they speak the "right words" in order to capitulate? Or do they become defensive and stubbornly refuse to engage in conversation? Or are you a privileged supervisor and find it uncomfortable to discuss multicultural and advocacy topics with your supervisees? In this session, privileged and marginalized supervisors and supervisees will discuss how to address several of these stances to facilitate growth with multiculturally resistant supervisees within contexts such as privilege, implicit bias, and mutual suasion.

              Learning Objectives:

              • Participants will be able to explain the background of implicit bias and practical steps to address it.
              • Participants will analyze three models for confronting racism.
              • Participants will be able to select techniques for addressing multicultural concerns with supervisees who hold multiple majority identities.


                3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

                Unlocking Opportunities: Working with Chinese International Students in Higher Education

                Presenter(s):

                Junwei Jia
                Northern State University

                Gregory Bohner
                Lindsey Wilson College
                   

                Abstract: Chinese international students (CISs) were the largest group of international students in the 2021-2022 academic year. CISs need help to acculturate to new customs and also need help to carry out filial practices. These acculturation challenges can impact Chinese individuals' academic success, career development, and personal identity development. With the great opportunities and challenges, it will be necessary to understand how Chinese individuals identify themselves in the current society and how their acculturating experiences impact family relationships and their own mental health. This presentation will explore two specific factors, acculturation stress, and filial piety, and how they relate to career and academic success. College counselors will learn culturally relevant services that can help Chinese international students navigate their educational journey.

                Learning Objectives:

                • Participants will discuss specific issues related to Chinese international students, such as acculturation stress, filial piety, and career development.
                • Participants will be able to prepare at least three effective strategies for working with Chinese international students.
                • Participants will be able to implement culturally relevant services for Chinese international students in college.

                Exploring Lived Experiences of College Counselors of Color in Predominantly White Institutions

                Presenter(s):

                Hyemi Jang
                North Carolina State University

                Zhiqi Liu
                North Carolina State University

                Abstract: Although the racial demographic of college students gradually diversifies, it is uncommon to observe students of color reporting experiences of discrimination and marginalization in predominantly White institutions (PWIs). As a part of an effort to cultivate a diverse and inclusive cultural climate on PWI campuses, college counselors, particularly those who are racial/ethnic minorities can have the significance in supporting students of color and mitigating adversities they may experience in PWIs. However, a hostile cultural climate not only can affect students of color but also counselors of color who work in this environment. Despite the scarcity of research studies focusing on college counseling settings, previous research indicates that counselors of color experience microaggressions in relationships with clients, supervisors, and administrators. In addition to negative experiences, participants in a study targeting school counselors of color report positive events such as being a role model or an advocate for students of color. As the first attempt to explore experiences among college counselors of color in PWIs, this presentation aims to investigate their work experiences and provide insights into creating strategies and institutional support to overcome the challenges they may encounter.

                Learning Objectives:

                • Attendees will gain understanding of work experiences of college counselors of color in PWIs.
                • Attendees will acquire knowledge on personal strategies and institutional support systems to navigate challenges that college counselors of color encounter in PWIs.

                A Whole New World (of Outreach): Changing and Building Counseling Center Programs to Support to Increase Access to Services

                Presenter(s):

                Phil Hughes
                BGSU Counseling Center

                Abstract: Conference attendees will have an opportunity to learn, discuss, and identify how their campus is engaging in outreach to educate and promote mental health awareness, wellness, and suicide prevention to historically underrepresented and marginalized populations. Often when we engage in outreach we do not focus our efforts on the historically marginalized folx who never enter our spaces that need our support. By engaging in an interactive discussion, identifying barriers and solutions to issues we may face in our efforts to reach marginalized folx, participants will leave with new inspiration, ideas, motivation, and empowerment to implement new programming on their campuses.

                Learning Objectives:

                • Discuss how your campus is currently trying to provide outreach to historically marginalized communities and openly share strategies on how we can better reach these communities to provide education around mental health and prevention.
                • Have participants identify and create a list of campus partners they can collaborate with in order to provide support on mental health initiatives; this also includes recognizing barriers to collaboration and potential solutions.
                • Engage participants to create and design their own new outreach to engage historically marginalized and underrepresented students on their campuses that they can ideally implement after the conference.

                Meeting the Psychiatric Needs of Students: A Shared Telepsychiatry Program

                Presenter(s):

                Kristen Moran
                UNC System Office

                Suzie Baker
                UNC System Office

                Kim Gorman
                Western Carolina University

                Abstract: Mental health needs of college students today are more complex. The number of students needing more intensive mental health services has stretched the capacity of university mental health staff to serve all students in need. In addition, it is noted that the impact of COVID is still unfolding and data indicates that mental health significantly impacts attainment rates. This presentation will discuss a shared telepsychiatry program developed to address gaps in psychiatric care in one university system, including neuropsychological testing and medication evaluation and management. Presenters will discuss system data, rationale, and specific details on program development. One university within the system will present its implementation of the shared telepsychiatry program on their campus, including logistical considerations, successes, and barriers. Small group discussion will allow participants to discuss and apply content to their own campuses.

                Learning Objectives:

                • Participants will be able to explain the rationale for a shared telepsychiatry program at the university level.
                • Participants will be able to describe how to systematically implement a shared telepsychiatry program.
                • Participants will discuss how one university campus implemented a shared telepsychiatry program, including key components and potential barriers.
                • Participants will discuss and apply information from the session to their own campus through small group discussion.

                I Am Not Okay: The Importance of Seeking Supportive Networks for Black Female Students in Counselor Education Programs

                Presenter(s):

                Ashley Williams-Whitley
                Arkansas State University

                Abstract: Previous studies (Williams-Whitley, 2023; Thomas et al., 2009) have shown the struggles that women of color, more specifically, Black Females, experience in counselor education programs. Thus, causing issues of students feeling marginalized in academic settings and struggling to maintain motivation, network with diverse peers, and maintain adequate self-care. In recent years, universities have tried to incorporate strategies to address minority students' diversity and intercultural issues. As counselor education programs work to incorporate multiculturalism into their coursework to better prepare counselors-in-training to work with clients with intersectionalities, some effects in doctoral programs can negatively impact matriculation in students and lower statistical data (Williams-Whitley, 2023). This program will help participants understand historical and current microaggressions that contribute to Black Female Students in Counselor Education seeking supportive networks outside of their program, identify effective supportive networks that help Black Female Students matriculate through Counselor Education programs, and examine methods that Counselor Educators and Universities can use to promote supportive networks to BIPOC students, specifically Black Female Students in Counselor Education by promoting inclusive mental health initiatives within counselor education programs.

                Learning Objectives:

                • Understand historical and current microaggressions that contribute to Black Female Students in Counselor Education seeking supportive networks outside of their program
                • Identify effective supportive networks that helps Black Female Students matriculate through Counselor Education programs
                • Examine methods that Counselor Educators and Universities can use to promote supportive networks to BIPOC students, specifically Black Female Students in Counselor Education by promoting inclusive mental health initiatives within counselor education progr

                CAS Standards

                Presenter(s):

                Lisa Adams
                Duke University

                Abstract: To increase the knowledge of CAS standards and guidelines, particularly as related to Counseling Services, and to develop familiarity with their uses.

                Learning Objectives:

                • To develop awareness of CAS and of the functional area standards
                • To develop comfort with using learning and development outcomes in counseling practice

                Playing with Fire: Ethical Considerations of Burnout & Wellness in Pre-licensed Counselors

                Presenter(s):

                Kristin Wills
                McNeese State University

                Kriti Vashisht
                Works at McNeese State University as a professor and counselor

                Abstract: Balancing ethical dilemmas, clinical demands, and personal well-being is a known challenge for pre-licensed counselors. Counselor burnout is increasingly identified as a barrier to maintaining professional competence and adhering to ethical standards. However, current discussions confine burnout on a micro level. Generally, experience paves the way to understand these challenges, which is crucial to adhere to ethical standards, to maintain a healthy well-being, and to work effectively work with clients. We will explore micro level challenges while also initiating dialogue regarding the meso and macro level challenges associated with counselor well-being. This presentation will use polls to engage the audience in discussion to explore current challenges associated with maintaining wellness and brainstorm possible solutions for each.

                Learning Objectives:

                • Explore the ethical responsibility of maintaining professional competence and mitigating burnout
                • Discuss the importance of addressing counselor wellness in both clinical training programs and the supervision process
                • Understand the ethical implications of micro, meso, and macro level challenges for pre-licensed counselors

                  Sunday, February 25, 2024

                  8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

                  The Evolving Landscape of College Counseling: Institutional Advocacy and Systemic Approaches to Strengthen Student Mental Health

                  Presenter(s):

                  Jeni Willenzik
                  Mercer University; The Jed Foundation

                  Abstract: With growing demand for student mental health support, it is increasingly critical for colleges and universities to adopt a comprehensive, whole-campus approach to student wellness (Hughes & Byrom, 2018; Wong et al., 2021). The Multicultural and Social Justice Counseling Competencies emphasize the crucial importance of balancing individual counseling with systemic advocacy to address institutional inequalities (Ratts et al., 2015). How is the role of counselors evolving in college counseling settings, and what strategies can equip them to provide comprehensive mental health support by advocating with and on behalf of students at the institutional level? This session will provide a comprehensive examination of best practices in mental health strategic planning and ensuring equitable implementation within college counseling centers. Upon completion, attendees will be equipped with the necessary knowledge and strategies to effectively advocate for and implement these best practices within their own institutions.

                  Learning Objectives:

                  • Participants will acquire a thorough understanding of institutional advocacy, which enhances protective factors and promotes equity for all students, and its crucial role for college counselors.
                  • Participants will learn about three key strategies for counselors to advocate for within educational institutions, including leveraging data to support marginalized students' needs, developing mental health strategic plans, and collaborating with faculty
                  • Participants will delve into innovative methods for integrating institutional advocacy frameworks into counseling, outreach, leadership, and supervision practices, including through case conceptualization techniques and case studies.

                  Thinking Differently About People Who Think Differently

                  Presenter(s):

                  Victoria Potocki
                  North Carolina State University

                  Elizabeth Lancaster
                  North Carolina State University

                  Abstract: Neurodivergent individuals are still labeled "disordered," and treatments designed for Autistic individuals continue to focus on bringing behaviors into alignment with social norms instead of reducing distress. Autistic individuals are asked to live in a world that is not built for them and that does not accommodate their needs. By learning to identify the common problems their Autistic clients face daily, counselors can recommend interventions that help reduce distress and improve their clients' ability to live meaningful lives. Clinicians will learn common differences of the neurodivergent brain, strategies for helping clients cope with sensory issues, and how to adapt DBT skills for use with Autistic clients.

                  Learning Objectives:

                  • Identify ways in which Autistic individuals are dis-abled by their environments.
                  • Learn to distinguish between sensory processing issues and mental illness.
                  • Learn interventions to help Autistic individuals reduce distress and exist more comfortably in society.

                  Collegiate Athletes and Alcohol and Substance Abuse: Essential Considerations and Interventions for College Counselors

                  Presenter(s):

                  Bethany Garr
                  Converse University

                  Shea Fontana
                  Prisma Health/University of South Carolina Psychiatry Residency Program

                  Abstract: Although there are numerous benefits to participation in athletics, there can also be drawbacks, including increased risk of alcohol and drug abuse. There are a number of factors that may impact alcohol and drug abuse that are unique to student-athletes, including performance enhancement, athletics-related stressors, team culture and dynamics, and evolving legislation and NCAA regulations. This presentation will provide an overview of trends, patterns, and risk and protective factors associated with alcohol and drug abuse in this demographic, as well as several examples of evidence-based interventions for addressing these concerns with student-athletes.

                  Learning Objectives:

                  • Participants will be able to describe how trends and patterns in alcohol and substance use differ between athletes and non-athletes.
                  • Participants will be able to describe the risk and protective factors associated with student-athletes as they pertain to alcohol and substance use.
                  • Participants will be able to describe the impact of alcohol and drug use on athletic performance.
                  • Participants will be able to describe at least three interventions aimed at reducing alcohol and drug use in student-athletes.

                  10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

                  More than a Resource Binder: Making the Most of Clinical Counseling Internships

                  Presenter(s):

                  Samantha Roth
                  MICA

                  Avetta White

                  Abstract: It is one of the privileges of being a clinical supervisor to help lift up those following behind us in the profession. Yet, we often hear of internships that leave interns feeling overwhelmed and overworked, without proper clinical preparation, and supervisors who feel disconnected and distant from their interns. In this breakout seminar, learn how to create a structured clinical counseling internship experience easily customized for individual interns, make the most of clinical supervision, and most importantly, leave your interns feeling prepared for the world after graduation. Samantha Roth, LCSW-C, will discuss how she designed and implemented internship programs for counseling students in two different clinical settings to successfully support students from practicum to internship.

                  Learning Objectives:

                  • Prepare supervisors to create a structured, positive, and developmentally supportive internship experience for counseling graduate students
                  • Assess common pitfalls for counseling internships and how to avoid them

                  Ally vs. Accomplice; INtegrating Cultural Humility

                  Presenter(s):

                  Diomarys Nunez
                  Holy Family University

                  Josue Martinez
                  Holy Family University

                  Abstract: There is no doubt that most people join the human services field to make positive change around them. In today's society, there are so many things happening at once and it is easy for clinicians to feel overwhelmed by all the different cultural knowledge they are expected to know. This presentation will first discuss common misconceptions and common mistakes that clinicians make when starting to work with individuals of color. We will be talking about the importance of clinicians and other professionals learning to have uncomfortable discussions with colleagues, clients, and their communities so that systemic racism can be dismantled. We will be identifying the benefits of engaging in work that is culturally humble and the importance of moving away from simply being culturally competent to be culturally humble.

                  Learning Objectives:

                  • After this presentation, participants will be able to feel confident enough to ask for help or clarification regarding multicultural concepts and issues without feeling ashamed or guilty.
                  •  After this presentation, participants will be able to have a better understanding of how to remain curious while learning about the importance of culture and adhering to ethical guidelines regarding cultural competence

                  Attached to Treatment: Utilizing attachment theory to conceptualize the therapeutic relationship between college student and mental health professional

                  Presenter(s):

                  Margaret Spierto
                  Robert Morris University

                  Erika Williams
                  Fairmont State University

                  Abstract: Research has indicated that attachment insecurities may create barriers for therapeutic change, while secure attachment orientations are associated with effective working alliances (Mikulincer et al., 2013). The program will begin by defining attachment relationships and providing an overview of the types of attachment styles. An exploration of attachment research with both adolescent and adult populations will be provided to allow for a more comprehensive understanding of the unique developmental level of college students. As biosocial factors have been shown to contribute greatly to the presentation of attachment styles (d'Elia, 2001), presenters will explore how these factors impact the therapeutic relationship and the client's openness to counseling. Implications of attachment within the therapeutic process as it relates to (a) success in treatment, such as using the therapist as a secure base (d'Elia, 2001), and (b) the therapeutic relationship as a microcosm of a client's external relationships, will also be discussed. Presenters will then define and explore internal working models, identifying the impact of a positive therapeutic relationship (Skourteli and Lennie, 2010). Finally, the program will discuss strategies to assess attachment styles pre and post therapy.

                  Learning Objectives:

                  • Attendees will review basics of attachment theory, as outlined by Bowlby and Ainsworth, and its application to emerging adult population
                  • Attendees will gain understanding of the bidirectional impact between attachment styles and the therapeutic relationship
                  • Attendees will be able to utilize attachment theory as a tool for progressing the therapeutic relationship


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